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Title: From Mach Cone to Reappeared Jet: What Do We Learn from PHENIX Results on Non-Identified Jet Correlation?

Abstract

Jet properties, extracted from two particle azimuth correlation, are found to be strongly modified in Au + Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 200 GeV. At intermediate pT and in central Au + Au collisions, the modifications appear as a broadening of jet width at the near side and a cone structure at the away side. As one increase the pT for both hadrons, the away side cone structure seems to gradually evolve into a peak structure. The interpretation of these results requires careful separation of various medium effects and surface bias.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20800082
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 828; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 35. internationals symposium on multiparticle dynamics; Workshop on particle correlations and femtoscopy, Kromeriz (Czech Republic), 9-17 Aug 2005; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2197420; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; CONES; CORRELATIONS; GEV RANGE; GOLD 197 REACTIONS; GOLD 197 TARGET; HADRONS; JET MODEL; MULTIPLE PRODUCTION; TRANSVERSE MOMENTUM

Citation Formats

Jia Jiangyong, and Nevis Laboratories, Irvington, NY 10533. From Mach Cone to Reappeared Jet: What Do We Learn from PHENIX Results on Non-Identified Jet Correlation?. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2197420.
Jia Jiangyong, & Nevis Laboratories, Irvington, NY 10533. From Mach Cone to Reappeared Jet: What Do We Learn from PHENIX Results on Non-Identified Jet Correlation?. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2197420.
Jia Jiangyong, and Nevis Laboratories, Irvington, NY 10533. Tue . "From Mach Cone to Reappeared Jet: What Do We Learn from PHENIX Results on Non-Identified Jet Correlation?". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2197420.
@article{osti_20800082,
title = {From Mach Cone to Reappeared Jet: What Do We Learn from PHENIX Results on Non-Identified Jet Correlation?},
author = {Jia Jiangyong and Nevis Laboratories, Irvington, NY 10533},
abstractNote = {Jet properties, extracted from two particle azimuth correlation, are found to be strongly modified in Au + Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 200 GeV. At intermediate pT and in central Au + Au collisions, the modifications appear as a broadening of jet width at the near side and a cone structure at the away side. As one increase the pT for both hadrons, the away side cone structure seems to gradually evolve into a peak structure. The interpretation of these results requires careful separation of various medium effects and surface bias.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2197420},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 828,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Apr 11 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Tue Apr 11 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
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