skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Mitogenic and chondrogenic effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 in adipose-derived mesenchymal cells

Abstract

Adipose-derived mesenchymal cells (AMCs) have demonstrated a great capacity for differentiating into bone, cartilage, and fat. Studies using bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells (BMSCs) have shown that fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2, a potent mitogenic factor, plays an important role in tissue engineering due to its effects in proliferation and differentiation for mesenchymal cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the function of FGF-2 in AMC chondrogenic differentiation and its possible contributions to cell-based therapeutics in skeletal tissue regeneration. Data demonstrated that FGF-2 significantly promoted the proliferation of AMCs and enhanced chondrogenesis in three-dimensional micromass culture. Moreover, priming AMCs with treatment of FGF-2 at 10 ng/ml demonstrated that cells underwent chondrogenic phenotypic differentiation, possibly by inducing N-Cadherin, FGF-receptor 2, and transcription factor Sox9. Our results indicated that FGF-2 potentiates chondrogenesis in AMCs, similar to its functions in BMSCs, suggesting the versatile potential applications of FGF-2 in skeletal regeneration and cartilage repair.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Children's Surgical Research Program, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine (United States)
  2. Children's Surgical Research Program, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine (United States). E-mail: Longaker@stanford.edu
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20798939
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 343; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.02.171; PII: S0006-291X(06)00431-1; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BONE MARROW; CARTILAGE; CELL PROLIFERATION; FIBROBLASTS; GROWTH FACTORS; RECEPTORS; REPAIR; SKELETON; TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS

Citation Formats

Chiou, Michael, Xu Yue, and Longaker, Michael T. Mitogenic and chondrogenic effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 in adipose-derived mesenchymal cells. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.02.171.
Chiou, Michael, Xu Yue, & Longaker, Michael T. Mitogenic and chondrogenic effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 in adipose-derived mesenchymal cells. United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.02.171.
Chiou, Michael, Xu Yue, and Longaker, Michael T. 2006. "Mitogenic and chondrogenic effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 in adipose-derived mesenchymal cells". United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.02.171.
@article{osti_20798939,
title = {Mitogenic and chondrogenic effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 in adipose-derived mesenchymal cells},
author = {Chiou, Michael and Xu Yue and Longaker, Michael T.},
abstractNote = {Adipose-derived mesenchymal cells (AMCs) have demonstrated a great capacity for differentiating into bone, cartilage, and fat. Studies using bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells (BMSCs) have shown that fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2, a potent mitogenic factor, plays an important role in tissue engineering due to its effects in proliferation and differentiation for mesenchymal cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the function of FGF-2 in AMC chondrogenic differentiation and its possible contributions to cell-based therapeutics in skeletal tissue regeneration. Data demonstrated that FGF-2 significantly promoted the proliferation of AMCs and enhanced chondrogenesis in three-dimensional micromass culture. Moreover, priming AMCs with treatment of FGF-2 at 10 ng/ml demonstrated that cells underwent chondrogenic phenotypic differentiation, possibly by inducing N-Cadherin, FGF-receptor 2, and transcription factor Sox9. Our results indicated that FGF-2 potentiates chondrogenesis in AMCs, similar to its functions in BMSCs, suggesting the versatile potential applications of FGF-2 in skeletal regeneration and cartilage repair.},
doi = {10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.02.171},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 2,
volume = 343,
place = {United States},
year = 2006,
month = 5
}
  • Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have demonstrated a capacity for differentiating into a variety of lineages, including bone, cartilage, or fat, depending on the inducing stimuli and specific growth and factors. It is acknowledged that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) promotes chondrogenic and inhibits osteogenic differentiation of ASCs, but thorough investigations of its effects on adipogenic differentiation are lacking. In this study, we demonstrate at the cellular and molecular levels the effect of FGF-2 on adipogenic differentiation of ASCs, as induced by an adipogenic hormonal cocktail consisting of 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), dexamethasone, insulin, and indomethacin. FGF-2 significantly enhances the adipogenic differentiation of humanmore » ASCs. Furthermore, in cultures receiving FGF-2 before adipogenic induction, mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}2 (PPAR{gamma}2), a key transcription factor in adipogenesis, was upregulated. The results of FGF-2 supplementation suggest the potential applications of FGF-2 and ASCs in adipose tissue regeneration.« less
  • Research highlights: {yields} Sprouty2-deficient mice exhibit cleft palate as a result of failure of palatal shelf elevation. {yields} We examined palate cell proliferation in Sprouty2-deficient mice. {yields} Palate mesenchymal cell proliferation was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice. {yields} Sprouty2 plays roles in murine palatogenesis by regulating cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Cleft palate is one of the most common craniofacial deformities. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) plays a central role in reciprocal interactions between adjacent tissues during palatal development, and the FGF signaling pathway has been shown to be inhibited by members of the Sprouty protein family. In this study, wemore » report the incidence of cleft palate, possibly caused by failure of palatal shelf elevation, in Sprouty2-deficient (KO) mice. Sprouty2-deficient palates fused completely in palatal organ culture. However, palate mesenchymal cell proliferation estimated by Ki-67 staining was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice compared with WT mice. Sprouty2-null palates expressed higher levels of FGF target genes, such as Msx1, Etv5, and Ptx1 than WT controls. Furthermore, proliferation and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activation in response to FGF was enhanced in palate mesenchymal cells transfected with Sprouty2 small interfering RNA. These results suggest that Sprouty2 regulates palate mesenchymal cell proliferation via FGF signaling and is involved in palatal shelf elevation.« less
  • Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FGF modulates BMPs pathway in HMSCs by down-regulating BMP/BMPR expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This effect is mediated by ERK and JNK MAPKs pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crosstalk between FGF and BMPs must be taken into account in skeletal bioengineering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It must also be considered in the use of recombinant BMPs in orthopedic and spine surgeries. -- Abstract: Understanding the interactions between growth factors and bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) signaling remains a crucial issue to optimize the use of human mesenchymal stem cells (HMSCs) and BMPs in therapeutic perspectives and bone tissue engineering. BMPs are potent inducers of osteoblastic differentiation. They exertmore » their actions via BMP receptors (BMPR), including BMPR1A, BMPR1B and BMPR2. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is expressed by cells of the osteoblastic lineage, increases their proliferation and is secreted during the healing process of fractures or in surgery bone sites. We hypothesized that FGF2 might influence HMSC osteoblastic differentiation by modulating expressions of BMPs and their receptors. BMP2, BMP4, BMPR1A and mainly BMPR1B expressions were up-regulated during this differentiation. FGF2 inhibited HMSCs osteoblastic differentiation and the up-regulation of BMPs and BMPR. This effect was prevented by inhibiting the ERK or JNK mitogen-activated protein kinases which are known to be activated by FGF2. These data provide a mechanism explaining the inhibitory effect of FGF2 on osteoblastic differentiation of HMSCs. These crosstalks between growth and osteogenic factors should be considered in the use of recombinant BMPs in therapeutic purpose of fracture repair or skeletal bioengineering.« less
  • Cartilage is an avascular tissue with only a limited potential to heal and chondrocytes in vitro have poor proliferative capacity. Recently, adipose-derived stromal cells (ASC) have demonstrated a great potential for application to tissue engineering due to their ability to differentiate into cartilage, bone, and fat. In this study, we have utilized a high density three-dimensional (3D) micromass model system of early chondrogenesis with ASC. The material properties of these micromasses showed a significant increase in dynamic and static elastic modulus during the early chondrogenic differentiation process. These data suggest that the 3D micromass culture system represents an in vitromore » model of early chondrogenesis with dynamic cell signaling interactions associated with the mechanical properties of chondrocyte differentiation.« less
  • Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expansion in low oxygen enhances MSC proliferation and osteogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation in low oxygen enhances chondrogenesis and suppresses hypertrophy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxygen can regulate the MSC phenotype for use in tissue engineering applications. -- Abstract: The local oxygen tension is a key regulator of the fate of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a low oxygen tension during expansion and differentiation on the proliferation kinetics as well as the subsequent osteogenic and chondrogenic potential of MSCs. We first hypothesised that expansion in a low oxygen tension (5% pO{sub 2}) wouldmore » improve both the subsequent osteogenic and chondrogenic potential of MSCs compared to expansion in a normoxic environment (20% pO{sub 2}). Furthermore, we hypothesised that chondrogenic differentiation in a low oxygen environment would suppress hypertrophy of MSCs cultured in both pellets and hydrogels used in tissue engineering strategies. MSCs expanded at 5% pO{sub 2} proliferated faster forming larger colonies, resulting in higher cell yields. Expansion at 5% pO{sub 2} also enhanced subsequent osteogenesis of MSCs, whereas differentiation at 5% pO{sub 2} was found to be a more potent promoter of chondrogenesis than expansion at 5% pO{sub 2}. Greater collagen accumulation, and more intense staining for collagen types I and X, was observed in pellets maintained at 20% pO{sub 2} compared to 5% pO{sub 2}. Both pellets and hydrogels stained more intensely for type II collagen when undergoing chondrogenesis in a low oxygen environment. Differentiation at 5% pO{sub 2} also appeared to inhibit hypertrophy in both pellets and hydrogels, as demonstrated by reduced collagen type X and Alizarin Red staining and alkaline phosphatase activity. This study demonstrates that the local oxygen environment can be manipulated in vitro to either stabilise a chondrogenic phenotype for use in cartilage repair therapies or to promote hypertrophy of cartilaginous grafts for endochondral bone repair strategies.« less