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Title: In vitro cardiomyogenic potential of human umbilical vein-derived mesenchymal stem cells

Abstract

Cardiomyocyte loss in the ischemically injured human heart often leads to irreversible defects in cardiac function. Recently, cellular cardiomyoplasty with mesenchymal stem cells, which are multipotent cells with the ability to differentiate into specialized cells under appropriate stimuli, has emerged as a new approach for repairing damaged myocardium. In the present study, the potential of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells to differentiate into cells with characteristics of cardiomyocyte was investigated. Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from endothelial/subendothelial layers of the human umbilical cords using a method similar to that of human umbilical vein endothelial cell isolation. Isolated cells were characterized by transdifferentiation ability to adipocytes and osteoblasts, and also with flow cytometry analysis. After treatment with 5-azacytidine, the human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells were morphologically transformed into cardiomyocyte-like cells and expressed cardiac differentiation markers. During the differentiation, cells were monitored by a phase contrast microscope and their morphological changes were demonstrated. Immunostaining of the differentiated cells for sarcomeric myosin (MF20), desmin, cardiac troponin I, and sarcomeric {alpha}-actinin was positive. RT-PCR analysis showed that these differentiated cells express cardiac-specific genes. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a cardiomyocyte-like ultrastructure and typical sarcomers. These observations confirm that human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stemmore » cells can be chemically transformed into cardiomyocytes and can be considered as a source of cells for cellular cardiomyoplasty.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6]
  1. Department of Biochemistry, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)
  2. Department of Biochemistry, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). E-mail: khatamibiochem@yahoo.com
  3. Department of Pathology, Zanjan Medical School, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)
  4. National Cell Bank of Iran (NCBI), Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)
  5. Department of Clinical Biochemistry, School of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modarres University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)
  6. Department of Hematology, School of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modarres University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20798796
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 340; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2005.12.047; PII: S0006-291X(05)02804-4; Copyright (c) 2005 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS; IN VITRO; MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES; MYOCARDIUM; MYOSIN; POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION; STEM CELLS; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; VEINS

Citation Formats

Kadivar, Mehdi, Khatami, Shohreh, Mortazavi, Yousef, Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali, Taghikhani, Mohammad, and Soleimani, Masoud. In vitro cardiomyogenic potential of human umbilical vein-derived mesenchymal stem cells. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2005.12.047.
Kadivar, Mehdi, Khatami, Shohreh, Mortazavi, Yousef, Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali, Taghikhani, Mohammad, & Soleimani, Masoud. In vitro cardiomyogenic potential of human umbilical vein-derived mesenchymal stem cells. United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2005.12.047.
Kadivar, Mehdi, Khatami, Shohreh, Mortazavi, Yousef, Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali, Taghikhani, Mohammad, and Soleimani, Masoud. Fri . "In vitro cardiomyogenic potential of human umbilical vein-derived mesenchymal stem cells". United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2005.12.047.
@article{osti_20798796,
title = {In vitro cardiomyogenic potential of human umbilical vein-derived mesenchymal stem cells},
author = {Kadivar, Mehdi and Khatami, Shohreh and Mortazavi, Yousef and Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali and Taghikhani, Mohammad and Soleimani, Masoud},
abstractNote = {Cardiomyocyte loss in the ischemically injured human heart often leads to irreversible defects in cardiac function. Recently, cellular cardiomyoplasty with mesenchymal stem cells, which are multipotent cells with the ability to differentiate into specialized cells under appropriate stimuli, has emerged as a new approach for repairing damaged myocardium. In the present study, the potential of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells to differentiate into cells with characteristics of cardiomyocyte was investigated. Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from endothelial/subendothelial layers of the human umbilical cords using a method similar to that of human umbilical vein endothelial cell isolation. Isolated cells were characterized by transdifferentiation ability to adipocytes and osteoblasts, and also with flow cytometry analysis. After treatment with 5-azacytidine, the human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells were morphologically transformed into cardiomyocyte-like cells and expressed cardiac differentiation markers. During the differentiation, cells were monitored by a phase contrast microscope and their morphological changes were demonstrated. Immunostaining of the differentiated cells for sarcomeric myosin (MF20), desmin, cardiac troponin I, and sarcomeric {alpha}-actinin was positive. RT-PCR analysis showed that these differentiated cells express cardiac-specific genes. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a cardiomyocyte-like ultrastructure and typical sarcomers. These observations confirm that human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells can be chemically transformed into cardiomyocytes and can be considered as a source of cells for cellular cardiomyoplasty.},
doi = {10.1016/j.bbrc.2005.12.047},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 2,
volume = 340,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 10 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Feb 10 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Highlights: • hUCB-MSCs maintained low immunogenicity even after immune challenge in vitro. • Humanized NSG mice were established using human UCB CD34+ cells. • Repeated intravenous hUCB-MSC injection into mice did not lead to immune responses and adverse events. • Allogeneic hUCB-MSCs maintained low immunogenicity in vitro and in vivo. - Abstract: Evaluation of the immunogenicity of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in an allogeneic setting during therapy has been hampered by lack of suitable models due to technical and ethical limitations. Here, we show that allogeneic human umbilical cord blood derived-MSCs (hUCB-MSCs) maintained low immunogenicity even after immune challengemore » in vitro. To confirm these properties in vivo, a humanized mouse model was established by injecting isolated hUCB-derived CD34+ cells intravenously into immunocompromised NOD/SCID IL2γnull (NSG) mice. After repeated intravenous injection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) or MRC5 cells into these mice, immunological alterations including T cell proliferation and increased IFN-γ, TNF-α, and human IgG levels, were observed. In contrast, hUCB-MSC injection did not elicit these responses. While lymphocyte infiltration in the lung and small intestine and reduced survival rates were observed after hPBMC or MRC5 transplantation, no adverse events were observed following hUCB-MSC introduction. In conclusion, our data suggest that allogeneic hUCB-MSCs have low immunogenicity in vitro and in vivo, and are therefore “immunologically safe” for use in allogeneic clinical applications.« less
  • Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditional medium and dan-shen root were used for cardiomyogenic differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They all could induce hPDMSCs to differentiate into cardiomyocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The induction effect of the latter was slightly higher compared to that of the former. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dan-shen root could be a good inducer for cardiomyogenic differentiation. -- Abstract: The aim of this study was to search for a good inducer agent using for cardiomyogenic differentiation of stem cells. Human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hPDMSCs) were isolated and incubated in enriched medium. Fourth passaged cells were treated with 10 mg/L dan-shen root for 20 days. Morphologic characteristics weremore » analyzed by confocal and electron microscopy. Expression of {alpha}-sarcomeric actin was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Expression of cardiac troponin-I (TnI) was analyzed by immunohistofluorescence. Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and beta-myocin heavy chain ({beta}-MHC) were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). hPDMSCs treated with dan-shen root gradually formed a stick-like morphology and connected with adjoining cells. On the 20th day, most of the induced cells stained positive with {alpha}-sarcomeric actin and TnI antibody. ANF and {beta}-MHC were also detected in the induced cells. Approximately 80% of the cells were successfully transdifferentiated into cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, dan-shen root is a good inducer agent used for cardiomyogenic differentiation of hPDMSCs.« less
  • Highlights: {yields} Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are potential seed cells for tissue-engineered skin. {yields} Tissue-derived umbilical cord MSCs (UCMSCs) can readily be isolated in vitro. {yields} We induce UCMSCs to differentiate into dermal fibroblasts via conditioned medium. {yields} Collagen type I and collagen type III mRNA level was higher in differentiated cells. {yields} UCMSCs-derived fibroblast-like cells strongly express fibroblast-specific protein. -- Abstract: Tissue-derived umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs) can be readily obtained, avoid ethical or moral constraints, and show excellent pluripotency and proliferation potential. UCMSCs are considered to be a promising source of stem cells in regenerative medicine. Inmore » this study, we collected newborn umbilical cord tissue under sterile conditions and isolated UCMSCs through a tissue attachment method. UCMSC cell surface markers were examined using flow cytometry. On the third passage, UCMSCs were induced to differentiate into dermal fibroblasts in conditioned induction media. The induction results were detected using immunofluorescence with a fibroblast-specific monoclonal antibody and real time PCR for type I and type III collagen. UCMSCs exhibited a fibroblast-like morphology and reached 90% confluency 14 to 18 days after primary culture. Cultured UCMSCs showed strong positive staining for CD73, CD29, CD44, CD105, and HLA-I, but not CD34, CD45, CD31, or HLA-DR. After differentiation, immunostaining for collagen type I, type III, fibroblast-specific protein, vimentin, and desmin were all strongly positive in induced cells, and staining was weak or negative in non-induced cells; total transcript production of collagen type I and collagen type III mRNA was higher in induced cells than in non-induced cells. These results demonstrate that UCMSCs can be induced to differentiate into fibroblasts with conditioned induction media and, in turn, could be used as seed cells for tissue-engineered dermis.« less
  • Bone marrow-derived stromal cells can give rise to cardiomyocytes as well as adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes in vitro. The existence of mesenchymal stem cells has been proposed, but it remains unclear if a single-cell-derived stem cell stochastically commits toward a cardiac lineage. By single-cell marking, we performed a follow-up study of individual cells during the differentiation of 9-15c mesenchymal stromal cells derived from bone marrow cells. Three types of cells, i.e., cardiac myoblasts, cardiac progenitors and multipotent stem cells were differentiated from a single cell, implying that cardiomyocytes are generated stochastically from a single-cell-derived stem cell. We also demonstrated thatmore » overexpression of Csx/Nkx2.5 and GATA4, precardiac mesodermal transcription factors, enhanced cardiomyogenic differentiation of 9-15c cells, and the frequency of cardiomyogenic differentiation was increased by co-culturing with fetal cardiomyocytes. Single-cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing Csx/Nkx2.5 and GATA4 behaved like cardiac transient amplifying cells, and still retained their plasticity in vivo.« less
  • Cartilaginous matrix-degenerative diseases like osteoarthritis (OA) are characterized by gradual cartilage erosion, and also by increased presence of cells with mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) character within the affected tissues. Moreover, primary chondrocytes long since are known to de-differentiate in vitro and to be chondrogenically re-differentiable. Since both findings appear to conflict with each other, we quantitatively assessed the mesenchymal differentiation potential of OA patient cartilage-derived cells (CDC) towards the osteogenic and adipogenic lineage in vitro and compared it to that of MSC isolated from adipose tissue (adMSC) of healthy donors. We analyzed expression of MSC markers CD29, CD44, CD105, andmore » CD166, and, following osteogenic and adipogenic induction in vitro, quantified their expression of osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation markers. Furthermore, CDC phenotype and proliferation were monitored. We found that CDC exhibit an MSC CD marker expression pattern similar to adMSC and a similar increase in proliferation rate during osteogenic differentiation. In contrast, the marked reduction of proliferation observed during adipogenic differentiation of adMSC was absent in CDC. Quantification of differentiation markers revealed a strong osteogenic differentiation potential for CDC, however almost no capacity for adipogenic differentiation. Since in the pathogenesis of OA, cartilage degeneration coincides with high bone turnover rates, the high osteogenic differentiation potential of OA patient-derived CDC may affect clinical therapeutic regimens aiming at autologous cartilage regeneration in these patients. - Highlights: • We analyze the mesenchymal differentiation capacity of cartilage-derived cells (CDC). • CDC express mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) markers CD29, CD44, CD105, and CD166. • CDC and MSC proliferation is reduced in adipogenesis and increased in osteogenesis. • Adipogenic differentiation is virtually absent in CDC, but strong in MSC. • Osteogenic differentiation is significantly stronger for CDC than for MSC.« less