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Title: All optical ultrafast synchrotron hard x-ray source

Abstract

Collimated beams of radiation can now be generated in the X-ray spectral range using laser systems. These new tools may provide efficient probing radiation for the analysis of dense plasmas and ultrafast atomic dynamics phenomena in the matter. Using relativistic laser-matter interaction, we have shown that X-ray radiation can be emitted within a collimated 20 mrad cone, in the spectral range of few keV, and with the additional unique properties to be ultrafast (100 fs timescale) and perfectly synchronized with the driving laser system.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. LOA, ENSTA-CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, LOA/ENSTA Chemin de la Huniere F-91761 Palaiseau (France)
  2. Insitut fuer Theoretische Physik I, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20798492
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 827; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 3. international conference on superstrong fields in plasmas, Varenna (Italy), 19-24 Sep 2005; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2195239; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; EMISSION; HARD X RADIATION; KEV RANGE; LASER RADIATION; LASERS; PLASMA; RELATIVISTIC RANGE; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION

Citation Formats

Albert, F., Shah, R., Phuoc, K. Ta, Rousseau, J., Burgy, F., Mercier, B., Rousse, A., Pukhov, A., and Kiselev, S.. All optical ultrafast synchrotron hard x-ray source. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2195239.
Albert, F., Shah, R., Phuoc, K. Ta, Rousseau, J., Burgy, F., Mercier, B., Rousse, A., Pukhov, A., & Kiselev, S.. All optical ultrafast synchrotron hard x-ray source. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2195239.
Albert, F., Shah, R., Phuoc, K. Ta, Rousseau, J., Burgy, F., Mercier, B., Rousse, A., Pukhov, A., and Kiselev, S.. Fri . "All optical ultrafast synchrotron hard x-ray source". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2195239.
@article{osti_20798492,
title = {All optical ultrafast synchrotron hard x-ray source},
author = {Albert, F. and Shah, R. and Phuoc, K. Ta and Rousseau, J. and Burgy, F. and Mercier, B. and Rousse, A. and Pukhov, A. and Kiselev, S.},
abstractNote = {Collimated beams of radiation can now be generated in the X-ray spectral range using laser systems. These new tools may provide efficient probing radiation for the analysis of dense plasmas and ultrafast atomic dynamics phenomena in the matter. Using relativistic laser-matter interaction, we have shown that X-ray radiation can be emitted within a collimated 20 mrad cone, in the spectral range of few keV, and with the additional unique properties to be ultrafast (100 fs timescale) and perfectly synchronized with the driving laser system.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2195239},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 827,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Apr 07 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Fri Apr 07 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
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