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Title: Nuclear isomers: stepping stones to the unknown

Abstract

The utility of isomers for exploring the nuclear landscape is discussed, including their role in superheavy-element research, and the possibility of observing neutron radioactivity. Emphasis is given to K isomers in deformed nuclei. Transition rates are examined in the NpNn scheme for 2- and 3-quasiparticle K-isomer decays, and in connection with level densities for higher quasiparticle numbers.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20798281
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 819; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 12. international symposium on capture gamma-ray spectroscopy and related topics, Notre Dame, IN (United States), 4-9 Sep 2005; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2187829; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; DEFORMED NUCLEI; ENERGY-LEVEL DENSITY; ENERGY-LEVEL TRANSITIONS; ISOMERIC NUCLEI; NEUTRONS; NUCLEAR DECAY; QUASI PARTICLES; RADIOACTIVITY

Citation Formats

Walker, P. M.. Nuclear isomers: stepping stones to the unknown. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2187829.
Walker, P. M.. Nuclear isomers: stepping stones to the unknown. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2187829.
Walker, P. M.. Mon . "Nuclear isomers: stepping stones to the unknown". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2187829.
@article{osti_20798281,
title = {Nuclear isomers: stepping stones to the unknown},
author = {Walker, P. M.},
abstractNote = {The utility of isomers for exploring the nuclear landscape is discussed, including their role in superheavy-element research, and the possibility of observing neutron radioactivity. Emphasis is given to K isomers in deformed nuclei. Transition rates are examined in the NpNn scheme for 2- and 3-quasiparticle K-isomer decays, and in connection with level densities for higher quasiparticle numbers.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2187829},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 819,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 13 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Mon Mar 13 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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