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Title: The Effect of Opening on Eddy Current Probe Response for an Idealized through Crack

Abstract

A structure representing an idealized through crack was formed by placing two coplanar aluminum rectangular plates next to one another with their edges separated by a small distance. The coil impedance variation with position was measured as a coil was moved over the adjacent plate edges. An analytical theory is used to evaluate the coil impedance change due to the gap between the plates. This theory is based on the truncated region eigenfunction expansion method. The difference between the eddy current probe signal due to a notch compared with that of a crack can be partly accounted for by the difference in the opening. We have investigated the effect of varying the opening of the simulated crack and shown theoretically and experimentally how the coil impedance changes with position, opening and frequency.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Iowa State University, Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, 1915 Scholl Road, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)
  2. Department of Engineering and Management of Energy Resources, University of West Macedonia, Kastorias and Fleming, 50100 Kozani (Greece)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20798253
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 820; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: Conference on review of progress in quantitative nondestructive evaluation, Brunswick, ME (United States), 31 Jul - 5 Aug 2005; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2184547; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ALUMINIUM; ALUMINIUM ALLOYS; CRACKS; EDDY CURRENT TESTING; EIGENFUNCTIONS; PLATES

Citation Formats

Fu Fangwei, Bowler, J. R., and Theodoulidis, T. P. The Effect of Opening on Eddy Current Probe Response for an Idealized through Crack. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2184547.
Fu Fangwei, Bowler, J. R., & Theodoulidis, T. P. The Effect of Opening on Eddy Current Probe Response for an Idealized through Crack. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2184547.
Fu Fangwei, Bowler, J. R., and Theodoulidis, T. P. Mon . "The Effect of Opening on Eddy Current Probe Response for an Idealized through Crack". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2184547.
@article{osti_20798253,
title = {The Effect of Opening on Eddy Current Probe Response for an Idealized through Crack},
author = {Fu Fangwei and Bowler, J. R. and Theodoulidis, T. P.},
abstractNote = {A structure representing an idealized through crack was formed by placing two coplanar aluminum rectangular plates next to one another with their edges separated by a small distance. The coil impedance variation with position was measured as a coil was moved over the adjacent plate edges. An analytical theory is used to evaluate the coil impedance change due to the gap between the plates. This theory is based on the truncated region eigenfunction expansion method. The difference between the eddy current probe signal due to a notch compared with that of a crack can be partly accounted for by the difference in the opening. We have investigated the effect of varying the opening of the simulated crack and shown theoretically and experimentally how the coil impedance changes with position, opening and frequency.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2184547},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 820,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 06 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Mon Mar 06 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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