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Title: Influence of Steel Reinforcement on In-Situ Stress Evaluation in Concrete Structures by the Core-Drilling Method

Abstract

The core-drilling method is an emerging technique for evaluating in-situ stress in a concrete structure. A small hole is drilled into the structure, and the deformations in the vicinity of the hole are measured and related via elasticity theory to the stress. The method is similar to the ASTM hole-drilling strain-gauge method excepting that displacements rather than strains are the measured quantities. The technique may be considered nondestructive since the ability of the structure to perform its function is unaffected, and the hole is easily repaired. Displacement measurements in the current work are performed using 3D digital image correlation and industrial photogrammetry. The current paper addresses perturbations in the method caused by steel reinforcement within the concrete. The reinforcement is significantly stiffer than the surrounding concrete, altering the expected displacement field. A numerical investigation performed indicates an under-prediction of stress by as much as 18 percent in a heavily reinforced structure, although the effect is significantly smaller for more common amounts of reinforcement.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Lehigh University Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20798227
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 820; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: Conference on review of progress in quantitative nondestructive evaluation, Brunswick, ME (United States), 31 Jul - 5 Aug 2005; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2184682; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CONCRETES; DEFORMATION; DRILLING; EVALUATION; MACHINING; NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING; STEELS; STRAIN GAGES; STRAINS; STRESS ANALYSIS; STRESSES

Citation Formats

McGinnis, M. J., and Pessiki, S. Influence of Steel Reinforcement on In-Situ Stress Evaluation in Concrete Structures by the Core-Drilling Method. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2184682.
McGinnis, M. J., & Pessiki, S. Influence of Steel Reinforcement on In-Situ Stress Evaluation in Concrete Structures by the Core-Drilling Method. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2184682.
McGinnis, M. J., and Pessiki, S. Mon . "Influence of Steel Reinforcement on In-Situ Stress Evaluation in Concrete Structures by the Core-Drilling Method". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2184682.
@article{osti_20798227,
title = {Influence of Steel Reinforcement on In-Situ Stress Evaluation in Concrete Structures by the Core-Drilling Method},
author = {McGinnis, M. J. and Pessiki, S.},
abstractNote = {The core-drilling method is an emerging technique for evaluating in-situ stress in a concrete structure. A small hole is drilled into the structure, and the deformations in the vicinity of the hole are measured and related via elasticity theory to the stress. The method is similar to the ASTM hole-drilling strain-gauge method excepting that displacements rather than strains are the measured quantities. The technique may be considered nondestructive since the ability of the structure to perform its function is unaffected, and the hole is easily repaired. Displacement measurements in the current work are performed using 3D digital image correlation and industrial photogrammetry. The current paper addresses perturbations in the method caused by steel reinforcement within the concrete. The reinforcement is significantly stiffer than the surrounding concrete, altering the expected displacement field. A numerical investigation performed indicates an under-prediction of stress by as much as 18 percent in a heavily reinforced structure, although the effect is significantly smaller for more common amounts of reinforcement.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2184682},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 820,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 06 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Mon Mar 06 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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