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Title: Water and Regolith Shielding for Surface Reactor Missions

Abstract

This paper investigates potential shielding options for surface power fission reactors. The majority of work is focused on a lunar shield that uses a combination of water in stainless-steel cans and lunar regolith. The major advantage of a water-based shield is that development, testing, and deployment should be relatively inexpensive. This shielding approach is used for three surface reactor concepts: (1) a moderated spectrum, NaK cooled, Hastalloy/UZrH reactor, (2) a fast-spectrum, NaK-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor, and (3) a fast-spectrum, K-heat-pipe-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor. For this study, each of these reactors is coupled to a 25-kWt Stirling power system, designed for 5 year life. The shields are designed to limit the dose both to the Stirling alternators and potential astronauts on the surface. The general configuration used is to bury the reactor, but several other options exist as well. Dose calculations are presented as a function of distance from reactor, depth of buried hole, water boron concentration (if any), and regolith repacked density.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Nuclear Systems Design Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, 87545 (United States)
  2. School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)
  3. Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20798029
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 813; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 10. conference on thermophysics applications in microgravity; 23. symposium on space nuclear power and propulsion; 4. conference on human/robotic technology and the national vision for space exploration; 4. symposium on space colonization; 3. symposium on new frontiers and future concepts, Albuquerque, NM (United States), 12-16 Feb 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2169277; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ALTERNATORS; BORON; POTASSIUM ALLOYS; POWER SYSTEMS; RADIATION DOSES; REACTOR MATERIALS; REACTORS; SHIELDING; SHIELDS; SODIUM ALLOYS; SPACE; SPACE VEHICLES; STAINLESS STEELS; SURFACES; TESTING; WATER

Citation Formats

Poston, David I., Sadasivan, Pratap, Dixon, David D., Ade, Brian J., and Leichliter, Katrina J.. Water and Regolith Shielding for Surface Reactor Missions. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2169277.
Poston, David I., Sadasivan, Pratap, Dixon, David D., Ade, Brian J., & Leichliter, Katrina J.. Water and Regolith Shielding for Surface Reactor Missions. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2169277.
Poston, David I., Sadasivan, Pratap, Dixon, David D., Ade, Brian J., and Leichliter, Katrina J.. Fri . "Water and Regolith Shielding for Surface Reactor Missions". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2169277.
@article{osti_20798029,
title = {Water and Regolith Shielding for Surface Reactor Missions},
author = {Poston, David I. and Sadasivan, Pratap and Dixon, David D. and Ade, Brian J. and Leichliter, Katrina J.},
abstractNote = {This paper investigates potential shielding options for surface power fission reactors. The majority of work is focused on a lunar shield that uses a combination of water in stainless-steel cans and lunar regolith. The major advantage of a water-based shield is that development, testing, and deployment should be relatively inexpensive. This shielding approach is used for three surface reactor concepts: (1) a moderated spectrum, NaK cooled, Hastalloy/UZrH reactor, (2) a fast-spectrum, NaK-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor, and (3) a fast-spectrum, K-heat-pipe-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor. For this study, each of these reactors is coupled to a 25-kWt Stirling power system, designed for 5 year life. The shields are designed to limit the dose both to the Stirling alternators and potential astronauts on the surface. The general configuration used is to bury the reactor, but several other options exist as well. Dose calculations are presented as a function of distance from reactor, depth of buried hole, water boron concentration (if any), and regolith repacked density.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2169277},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 813,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 20 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Jan 20 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}