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Title: Shield Design for Lunar Surface Applications

Abstract

A shielding concept for lunar surface applications of nuclear power is presented herein. The reactor, primary shield, reactor equipment and power generation module are placed in a cavity in the lunar surface. Support structure and heat rejection radiator panels are on the surface, outside the cavity. The reactor power of 1,320 kWt was sized to deliver 50 kWe from a thermoelectric power conversion subsystem. The dose rate on the surface is less than 0.6 mRem/hr at 100 meters from the reactor. Unoptimized shield mass is 1,020 kg which is much lighter than a comparable 4{pi} shield weighing in at 17,000 kg.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Pratt and Whitney -- Rocketdyne, Inc., 6633 Canoga Avenue, P.O. Box 7922 MC LA-13, Canoga Park, California 91309-7922 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20798011
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 813; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 10. conference on thermophysics applications in microgravity; 23. symposium on space nuclear power and propulsion; 4. conference on human/robotic technology and the national vision for space exploration; 4. symposium on space colonization; 3. symposium on new frontiers and future concepts, Albuquerque, NM (United States), 12-16 Feb 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2169251; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; DESIGN; DOSE RATES; ENERGY CONVERSION; NUCLEAR POWER; POWER GENERATION; RADIATORS; SHIELDING; SHIELDS; SURFACES

Citation Formats

Johnson, Gregory A. Shield Design for Lunar Surface Applications. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2169251.
Johnson, Gregory A. Shield Design for Lunar Surface Applications. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2169251.
Johnson, Gregory A. 2006. "Shield Design for Lunar Surface Applications". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2169251.
@article{osti_20798011,
title = {Shield Design for Lunar Surface Applications},
author = {Johnson, Gregory A.},
abstractNote = {A shielding concept for lunar surface applications of nuclear power is presented herein. The reactor, primary shield, reactor equipment and power generation module are placed in a cavity in the lunar surface. Support structure and heat rejection radiator panels are on the surface, outside the cavity. The reactor power of 1,320 kWt was sized to deliver 50 kWe from a thermoelectric power conversion subsystem. The dose rate on the surface is less than 0.6 mRem/hr at 100 meters from the reactor. Unoptimized shield mass is 1,020 kg which is much lighter than a comparable 4{pi} shield weighing in at 17,000 kg.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2169251},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 813,
place = {United States},
year = 2006,
month = 1
}
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