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Title: A technique for adaptive image-guided helical tomotherapy for lung cancer

Abstract

Purpose: The gross tumor volume (GTV) for many lung cancer patients can decrease during the course of radiation therapy. As the tumor reduces in size during treatment, the margin added around the GTV effectively becomes larger, which can result in the excessive irradiation of normal lung tissue. The specific goal of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using image-guided adaptive radiation therapy to adjust the planning target volume weekly based on the previous week's CT image sets that were used for image-guided patient setup. Methods and Materials: Megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) images of the GTV were acquired daily on a helical tomotherapy system. These images were used to position the patient and to measure reduction in GTV volume. A planning study was conducted to determine the amount of lung-sparing that could have been achieved if adaptive therapy had been used. Treatment plans were created in which the target volumes were reduced after tumor reduction was measured. Results: A total of 158 MVCT imaging sessions were performed on 7 lung patients. The GTV was reduced by 60-80% during the course of treatment. The tumor reduction in the first 60 days of treatment can be modeled using the second-order polynomialmore » R 0.0002t {sup 2} - 0.0219t + 1.0, where R is the percent reduction in GTV, and t is the number of elapsed days. Based on these treatment planning studies, the absolute volume of ipsilateral lung receiving 20 Gy can be reduced between 17% and 23% (21% mean) by adapting the treatment delivery. The benefits of adaptive therapy are the greatest for tumor volumes {>=}25 cm{sup 3} and are directly dependent on GTV reduction during treatment. Conclusions: Megavoltage CT-based image guidance can be used to position lung cancer patients daily. This has the potential to decrease margins associated with daily setup error. Furthermore, the adaptive therapy technique described in this article can decrease the volume of healthy lung tissue receiving above 20 Gy. However, further study is needed to determine whether adaptive therapy could result in the underdosing of microscopic extension.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Thompson Cancer Survival Center, Knoxville, TN (United States). E-mail: cramsey@utk.edu
  2. Department of Radiation Oncology, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, FL (United States)
  3. Department of Radiation Oncology, Thompson Cancer Survival Center, Knoxville, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20793406
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 64; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2005.11.012; PII: S0360-3016(05)02947-0; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CARCINOMAS; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; ERRORS; IMAGES; IRRADIATION; LUNGS; PATIENTS; PLANNING; POLYNOMIALS; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Ramsey, Chester R., Langen, Katja M., Kupelian, Patrick A., Scaperoth, Daniel D., Meeks, Sanford L., Mahan, Stephen L., and Seibert, Rebecca M. A technique for adaptive image-guided helical tomotherapy for lung cancer. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.1.
Ramsey, Chester R., Langen, Katja M., Kupelian, Patrick A., Scaperoth, Daniel D., Meeks, Sanford L., Mahan, Stephen L., & Seibert, Rebecca M. A technique for adaptive image-guided helical tomotherapy for lung cancer. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.1.
Ramsey, Chester R., Langen, Katja M., Kupelian, Patrick A., Scaperoth, Daniel D., Meeks, Sanford L., Mahan, Stephen L., and Seibert, Rebecca M. Wed . "A technique for adaptive image-guided helical tomotherapy for lung cancer". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.1.
@article{osti_20793406,
title = {A technique for adaptive image-guided helical tomotherapy for lung cancer},
author = {Ramsey, Chester R. and Langen, Katja M. and Kupelian, Patrick A. and Scaperoth, Daniel D. and Meeks, Sanford L. and Mahan, Stephen L. and Seibert, Rebecca M.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The gross tumor volume (GTV) for many lung cancer patients can decrease during the course of radiation therapy. As the tumor reduces in size during treatment, the margin added around the GTV effectively becomes larger, which can result in the excessive irradiation of normal lung tissue. The specific goal of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using image-guided adaptive radiation therapy to adjust the planning target volume weekly based on the previous week's CT image sets that were used for image-guided patient setup. Methods and Materials: Megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) images of the GTV were acquired daily on a helical tomotherapy system. These images were used to position the patient and to measure reduction in GTV volume. A planning study was conducted to determine the amount of lung-sparing that could have been achieved if adaptive therapy had been used. Treatment plans were created in which the target volumes were reduced after tumor reduction was measured. Results: A total of 158 MVCT imaging sessions were performed on 7 lung patients. The GTV was reduced by 60-80% during the course of treatment. The tumor reduction in the first 60 days of treatment can be modeled using the second-order polynomial R 0.0002t {sup 2} - 0.0219t + 1.0, where R is the percent reduction in GTV, and t is the number of elapsed days. Based on these treatment planning studies, the absolute volume of ipsilateral lung receiving 20 Gy can be reduced between 17% and 23% (21% mean) by adapting the treatment delivery. The benefits of adaptive therapy are the greatest for tumor volumes {>=}25 cm{sup 3} and are directly dependent on GTV reduction during treatment. Conclusions: Megavoltage CT-based image guidance can be used to position lung cancer patients daily. This has the potential to decrease margins associated with daily setup error. Furthermore, the adaptive therapy technique described in this article can decrease the volume of healthy lung tissue receiving above 20 Gy. However, further study is needed to determine whether adaptive therapy could result in the underdosing of microscopic extension.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.1},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 4,
volume = 64,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of preoperative adaptive radiochemotherapy by delivering a concomitant boost to the residual tumor during the last 6 fractions of treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with T3/T4N0 or N+ rectal cancer were enrolled. Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of oxaliplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} on days −14, 0, and +14, and 5-fluorouracil 200 mg/m{sup 2}/d from day −14 to the end of radiation therapy (day 0 is the start of radiation therapy). Radiation therapy consisted of 41.4 Gy in 18 fractions (2.3 Gy per fraction) with Tomotherapy to the tumor and regional lymph nodes (planning target volume, PTV)more » defined on simulation CT and MRI. After 9 fractions simulation CT and MRI were repeated for the planning of the adaptive phase: PTV{sub adapt} was generated by adding a 5-mm margin to the residual tumor. In the last 6 fractions a boost of 3.0 Gy per fraction (in total 45.6 Gy in 18 fractions) was delivered to PTV{sub adapt} while concomitantly delivering 2.3 Gy per fraction to PTV outside PTV{sub adapt}. Results: Three patients experienced grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity; 2 of 3 showed toxicity before the adaptive phase. Full dose of radiation therapy, oxaliplatin, and 5-fluorouracil was delivered in 96%, 96%, and 88% of patients, respectively. Two patients with clinical complete response (cCR) refused surgery and were still cCR at 17 and 29 months. For the remaining 23 resected patients, 15 of 23 (65%) showed tumor regression grade 3 response, and 7 of 23 (30%) had pathologic complete response; 8 (35%) and 12 (52%) tumor regression grade 3 patients had ≤5% and 10% residual viable cells, respectively. Conclusions: An adaptive boost strategy is feasible, with an acceptable grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity rate and a very encouraging tumor response rate. The results suggest that there should still be room for further dose escalation of the residual tumor with the aim of increasing pathologic complete response and/or cCR rates.« less
  • Purpose: Online image guidance (IG) has been used to effectively correct the setup error and inter-fraction rigid organ motion for prostate cancer. However, planning margins are still necessary to account for uncertainties such as deformation and intra-fraction motion. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of an adaptive planning technique incorporating offline dose feedback to manage inter-fraction motion and residuals from online correction. Methods: Repeated helical CT scans from 28 patients were included in the study. The contours of prostate and organs-at-risk (OARs) were delineated on each CT, and online IG was simulated by matching center-of-mass ofmore » prostate between treatment CTs and planning CT. A seven beam intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan was designed for each patient on planning CT for a total of 15 fractions. Dose distribution at each fraction was evaluated based on actual contours of the target and OARs from that fraction. Cumulative dose up to each fraction was calculated by tracking each voxel based on a deformable registration algorithm. The cumulative dose was compared with the dose from initial plan. If the deviation exceeded the pre-defined threshold, such as 2% of the D{sub 99} to the prostate, an adaptive planning technique called dose compensation was invoked, in which the cumulative dose distribution was fed back to the treatment planning system and the dose deficit was made up through boost radiation in future treatment fractions. The dose compensation was achieved by IMRT inverse planning. Two weekly compensation delivery strategies were simulated: one intended to deliver the boost dose in all future fractions (schedule A) and the other in the following week only (schedule B). The D{sub 99} to prostate and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) to rectal wall and bladder were computed and compared with those without the dose compensation. Results: If only 2% underdose is allowed at the end of the treatment course, then 11 patients fail. If the same criteria is assessed at the end of each week (every five fractions), then 14 patients fail, with three patients failing the 1st or 2nd week but passing at the end. The average dose deficit from these 14 patients was 4.4%. They improved to 2% after the weekly compensation. Out of these 14 patients who needed dose compensation, ten passed the dose criterion after weekly dose compensation, three patients failed marginally, and one patient still failed the criterion significantly (10% deficit), representing 3.6% of the patient population. A more aggressive compensation frequency (every three fractions) could successfully reduce the dose deficit to the acceptable level for this patient. The average number of required dose compensation re-planning per patient was 0.82 (0.79) per patient for schedule A (B) delivery strategy. The doses to OARs were not significantly different from the online IG only plans without dose compensation. Conclusions: We have demonstrated the effectiveness of offline dose compensation technique in image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer. It can effectively account for residual uncertainties which cannot be corrected through online IG. Dose compensation allows further margin reduction and critical organs sparing.« less
  • Introduction: Patients with vertebral metastasis that receive radiation therapy are typically treated to the spinal cord tolerance dose. As such, it is difficult to successfully deliver a second course of radiation therapy for patients with overlapping treatment volumes. In this study, an image-guided helical tomotherapy system was evaluated for the retreatment of previously irradiated vertebral metastasis. Methods and Materials: Helical tomotherapy dose gradients and maximum cord doses were measured in a cylindrical phantom for geometric test cases with separations between the planning target volume (PTV) and the spinal cord organ at risk (OAR) of 2 mm, 4 mm, 6 mm,more » 8 mm, and 10 mm. Megavoltage computed tomography (CT) images were examined for their ability to localize spinal anatomy for positioning purposes by repeat imaging of the cervical spine in an anthropomorphic phantom. In addition to the phantom studies, 8 patients with cord compressions that had received previous radiation therapy were retreated to a mean dose of 28 Gy using conventional fractionation. Results and Discussion: Megavoltage CT images were capable of positioning an anthropomorphic phantom to within {+-}1.2 mm (2{sigma}) superior-inferiorly and within {+-}0.6 mm (2{sigma}) anterior-posteriorly and laterally. Dose gradients of 10% per mm were measured in phantom while PTV uniformity indices of less than 11% were maintained. The calculated maximum cord dose was 25% of the prescribed dose for a 10-mm PTV-to-OAR separation and 71% of the prescribed dose for a PTV-to-OAR separation of 2 mm. Eight patients total have been treated without radiation-induced myelopathy or any other adverse effects from treatment. Conclusions: A technique has been evaluated for the retreatment of vertebral metastasis using image-guided helical tomotherapy. Phantom and patient studies indicated that a tomotherapy system is capable of delivering dose gradients of 10% per mm and positioning the patient within 1.2 mm without the use of special stereotactic immobilization.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the image-guidance capabilities of megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT), this article compares the interobserver and intraobserver contouring uncertainty in kilovoltage computed tomography (KVCT) used for radiotherapy planning with MVCT acquired with helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: Five prostate-cancer patients were evaluated. Each patient underwent a KVCT and an MVCT study, a total of 10 CT studies. For interobserver variability analysis, four radiation oncologists, one physicist, and two radiation therapists (seven observers in total) contoured the prostate and seminal vesicles (SV) in the 10 studies. The intraobserver variability was assessed by asking all observers to repeat the contouring ofmore » 1 patient's KVCT and MVCT studies. Quantitative analysis of contour variations was performed by use of volumes and radial distances. Results: The interobserver and intraobserver contouring uncertainty was larger in MVCT compared with KVCT. Observers consistently segmented larger volumes on MVCT where the ratio of average prostate and SV volumes was 1.1 and 1.2, respectively. On average (interobserver and intraobserver), the local delineation variability, in terms of standard deviations [{delta}{sigma} = {radical}({sigma}{sup 2} {sub MVCT} - {sigma}{sup 2} {sub KVCT})], increased by 0.32 cm from KVCT to MVCT. Conclusions: Although MVCT was inferior to KVCT for prostate delineation, the application of MVCT in prostate radiotherapy remains useful.« less
  • Purpose: To develop a treatment technique to spare normal tissue and allow dose escalation in total body irradiation (TBI). We have developed intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques for the total marrow irradiation (TMI), total lymphatic irradiation, or total bone marrow plus lymphatic irradiation using helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: For TBI, we typically use 12 Gy in 10 fractions delivered at an extended source-to-surface distance (SSD). Using helical tomotherapy, it is possible to deliver equally effective doses to the bone marrow and lymphatics while sparing normal organs to a significant degree. In the TMI patients, whole body skeletal bone, including the ribsmore » and sternum, comprise the treatment target. In the total lymphatic irradiation, the target is expanded to include the spleen and major lymph node areas. Sanctuary sites for disease (brain and testes) are included when clinically indicated. Spared organs include the lungs, esophagus, parotid glands, eyes, oral cavity, liver, kidneys, stomach, small and large intestine, bladder, and ovaries. Results: With TBI, all normal organs received the TBI dose; with TMI, total lymphatic irradiation, and total bone marrow plus lymphatic irradiation, the visceral organs are spared. For the first 6 patients treated with TMI, the median dose to organs at risk averaged 51% lower than would be achieved with TBI. By putting greater weight on the avoidance of specific organs, greater sparing was possible. Conclusion: Sparing of normal tissues and dose escalation is possible using helical tomotherapy. Late effects such as radiation pneumonitis, veno-occlusive disease, cataracts, neurocognitive effects, and the development of second tumors should be diminished in severity and frequency according to the dose reduction realized for the organs at risk.« less