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Title: X-ray volume imaging in bladder radiotherapy verification

Abstract

Purpose: To assess the clinical utility of X-ray volume imaging (XVI) for verification of bladder radiotherapy and to quantify geometric error in bladder radiotherapy delivery. Methods and Materials: Twenty subjects undergoing conformal bladder radiotherapy were recruited. X-ray volume images and electronic portal images (EPIs) were acquired for the first 5 fractions and then once weekly. X-ray volume images were co-registered with the planning computed tomography scan and clinical target volume coverage assessed in three dimensions (3D). Interfraction bladder volume change was described by quantifying changes in bladder volume with time. Bony setup errors were compared from both XVI and EPI. Results: The bladder boundary was clearly visible on coronal XVI views in nearly all images, allowing accurate 3D treatment verification. In 93.5% of imaged fractions, the clinical target volume was within the planning target volume. Most subjects displayed consistent bladder volumes, but 25% displayed changes that could be predicted from the first three XVIs. Bony setup errors were similar whether calculated from XVI or EPI. Conclusions: Coronal XVI can be used to verify 3D bladder radiotherapy delivery. Image-guided interventions to reduce geographic miss and normal tissue toxicity are feasible with this technology.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [4];  [4];  [4];  [5];  [3];  [5]
  1. Academic Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom). E-mail: amhenry@doctors.net.uk
  2. Wade Centre for Radiotherapy Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom)
  3. Developing Technology Group, North Western Medical Physics, Manchester (United Kingdom)
  4. Department of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom)
  5. Academic Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20793397
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 64; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2005.09.044; PII: S0360-3016(05)02730-6; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BLADDER; CARCINOMAS; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; ERRORS; IMAGES; RADIOTHERAPY; TOXICITY; VERIFICATION; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Henry, Ann M., Stratford, Julia, McCarthy, Claire, Davies, Julie, Sykes, Jonathan R., Amer, Ali, Marchant, Tom, Cowan, Richard, Wylie, James, Logue, John, Livsey, Jacqueline, Khoo, Vincent S., Moore, Chris, and Price, Pat. X-ray volume imaging in bladder radiotherapy verification. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
Henry, Ann M., Stratford, Julia, McCarthy, Claire, Davies, Julie, Sykes, Jonathan R., Amer, Ali, Marchant, Tom, Cowan, Richard, Wylie, James, Logue, John, Livsey, Jacqueline, Khoo, Vincent S., Moore, Chris, & Price, Pat. X-ray volume imaging in bladder radiotherapy verification. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
Henry, Ann M., Stratford, Julia, McCarthy, Claire, Davies, Julie, Sykes, Jonathan R., Amer, Ali, Marchant, Tom, Cowan, Richard, Wylie, James, Logue, John, Livsey, Jacqueline, Khoo, Vincent S., Moore, Chris, and Price, Pat. Wed . "X-ray volume imaging in bladder radiotherapy verification". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
@article{osti_20793397,
title = {X-ray volume imaging in bladder radiotherapy verification},
author = {Henry, Ann M. and Stratford, Julia and McCarthy, Claire and Davies, Julie and Sykes, Jonathan R. and Amer, Ali and Marchant, Tom and Cowan, Richard and Wylie, James and Logue, John and Livsey, Jacqueline and Khoo, Vincent S. and Moore, Chris and Price, Pat},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To assess the clinical utility of X-ray volume imaging (XVI) for verification of bladder radiotherapy and to quantify geometric error in bladder radiotherapy delivery. Methods and Materials: Twenty subjects undergoing conformal bladder radiotherapy were recruited. X-ray volume images and electronic portal images (EPIs) were acquired for the first 5 fractions and then once weekly. X-ray volume images were co-registered with the planning computed tomography scan and clinical target volume coverage assessed in three dimensions (3D). Interfraction bladder volume change was described by quantifying changes in bladder volume with time. Bony setup errors were compared from both XVI and EPI. Results: The bladder boundary was clearly visible on coronal XVI views in nearly all images, allowing accurate 3D treatment verification. In 93.5% of imaged fractions, the clinical target volume was within the planning target volume. Most subjects displayed consistent bladder volumes, but 25% displayed changes that could be predicted from the first three XVIs. Bony setup errors were similar whether calculated from XVI or EPI. Conclusions: Coronal XVI can be used to verify 3D bladder radiotherapy delivery. Image-guided interventions to reduce geographic miss and normal tissue toxicity are feasible with this technology.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 4,
volume = 64,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Purpose: To quantify daily bladder size and position variations during bladder cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten bladder cancer patients underwent daily cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging of the bladder during radiotherapy. Bladder and planning target volumes (bladder/PTV) from CBCT and planning CT scans were compared with respect to bladder center-of-mass shifts in the x (lateral), y (anterior-posterior), and z (superior-inferior) coordinates, bladder/PTV size, bladder/PTV margin positions, overlapping areas, and mutually exclusive regions. Results: A total of 262 CBCT images were obtained from 10 bladder cancer patients. Bladder center of mass shifted most in the y coordinate (mean, -0.32 cm).more » The anterior bladder wall shifted the most (mean, -0.58 cm). Mean ratios of CBCT-derived bladder and PTV volumes to planning CT-derived counterparts were 0.83 and 0.88. The mean CBCT-derived bladder volume (+- standard deviation [SD]) outside the planning CT counterpart was 29.24 cm{sup 3} (SD, 29.71 cm{sup 3}). The mean planning CT-derived bladder volume outside the CBCT counterpart was 47.74 cm{sup 3} (SD, 21.64 cm{sup 3}). The mean CBCT PTV outside the planning CT-derived PTV was 47.35 cm{sup 3} (SD, 36.51 cm{sup 3}). The mean planning CT-derived PTV outside the CBCT-derived PTV was 93.16 cm{sup 3} (SD, 50.21). The mean CBCT-derived bladder volume outside the planning PTV was 2.41 cm{sup 3} (SD, 3.97 cm{sup 3}). CBCT bladder/ PTV volumes significantly differed from planning CT counterparts (p = 0.047). Conclusions: Significant variations in bladder and PTV volume and position occurred in patients in this trial.« less
  • Treatment simulation has significantly improved the accuracy and precision of radiation therapy delivery. A new generation of therapy systems promises to take the simulation and imaging process to a new level of accuracy; however, this will require changes in the workflow process. We describe the first generation of these devices, review the various imaging options and how they might be used in the clinic to improve treatment outcomes, and suggest several workflow approaches. Workflows discussed include on-line interventional, off-line adaptive, and off-line predictive approaches, with both geometric and dosimetric considerations. These changes will place new knowledge requirements on the medicalmore » dosimetrist and will necessitate involvement in the development of new departmental processes.« less
  • Purpose: To estimate bladder movements and changes in dose distribution in the bladder and surrounding tissues associated with changes in bladder filling and to estimate the internal treatment margins. Methods and Materials: A total of 16 patients with bladder cancer underwent planning computed tomography scans with 80- and 150-mL bladder volumes. The bladder displacements associated with the change in volume were measured. Each patient had treatment plans constructed for a 'partially empty' (80 mL) and a 'partially full' (150 mL) bladder. An additional plan was constructed for tumor irradiation alone. A subsequent 9 patients underwent sequential weekly computed tomography scanningmore » during radiotherapy to verify the bladder movements and estimate the internal margins. Results: Bladder movements were mainly observed cranially, and the estimated internal margins were nonuniform and largest (>2 cm) anteriorly and cranially. The dose distribution in the bladder worsened if the bladder increased in volume: 70% of patients (11 of 16) would have had bladder underdosed to <95% of the prescribed dose. The dose distribution in the rectum and intestines was better with a 'partially empty' bladder (volume that received >70%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed dose was 23%, 20%, and 15% for the rectum and 162, 144, 123 cm{sup 3} for the intestines, respectively) than with a 'partially full' bladder (volume that received >70%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed dose was 28%, 24%, and 18% for the rectum and 180, 158, 136 cm{sup 3} for the intestines, respectively). The change in bladder filling during RT was significant for the dose distribution in the intestines. Tumor irradiation alone was significantly better than whole bladder irradiation in terms of organ sparing. Conclusion: The displacements of the bladder due to volume changes were mainly related to the upper wall. The internal margins should be nonuniform, with the largest margins cranially and anteriorly. The changes in bladder filling during RT could influence the dose distribution in the bladder and intestines. The dose distribution in the rectum and bowel was slightly better with a 'partially empty' than with a 'full' bladder.« less
  • Purpose: X-ray volumetric imaging (XVI) for the first time allows for the on-treatment acquisition of three-dimensional (3D) kV cone beam computed tomography (CT) images. Clinical imaging using the Synergy System (Elekta, Crawley, UK) commenced in July 2003. This study evaluated image quality and dose delivered and assessed clinical utility for treatment verification at a range of anatomic sites. Methods and Materials: Single XVIs were acquired from 30 patients undergoing radiotherapy for tumors at 10 different anatomic sites. Patients were imaged in their setup position. Radiation doses received were measured using TLDs on the skin surface. The utility of XVI inmore » verifying target volume coverage was qualitatively assessed by experienced clinicians. Results: X-ray volumetric imaging acquisition was completed in the treatment position at all anatomic sites. At sites where a full gantry rotation was not possible, XVIs were reconstructed from projection images acquired from partial rotations. Soft-tissue definition of organ boundaries allowed direct assessment of 3D target volume coverage at all sites. Individual image quality depended on both imaging parameters and patient characteristics. Radiation dose ranged from 0.003 Gy in the head to 0.03 Gy in the pelvis. Conclusions: On-treatment XVI provided 3D verification images with soft-tissue definition at all anatomic sites at acceptably low radiation doses. This technology sets a new standard in treatment verification and will facilitate novel adaptive radiotherapy techniques.« less