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Title: French multicenter phase III randomized study testing concurrent twice-a-day radiotherapy and cisplatin/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (BiRCF) in unresectable pharyngeal carcinoma: Results at 2 years (FNCLCC-GORTEC)

Abstract

Background: Unresectable carcinomas of the oropharynx and hypopharynx still have a poor long-term prognosis. Following a previous phase II study, this phase III multicenter trial was conducted between November 1997 and March 2002. Methods: Nontreated, strictly unresectable cases were eligible. Twice-daily radiation: two fractions of 1.2 Gy/day, 5 days per week, with no split (D1{sup {yields}}D46). Total tumor doses: 80.4 Gy/46 day (oropharynx), 75.6 Gy/44 day (hypopharynx). Chemotherapy (arm B): Cisplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} (D1, D22, D43); 5FU, continuous infusion (D1{sup {yields}}D5), 750 mg/m{sup 2}/day cycle 1; 430 mg/m{sup 2}/day cycles 2 and 3. Results: A total of 163 evaluable patients. Grade 3-4 acute mucositis 82.6% arm B/69.5% arm A (NS); Grade 3-4 neutropenia 33.3% arm B/2.4% arm A (p < 0.05). Enteral nutrition through gastrostomy tube was more frequent in arm B before treatment and at 6 months (p < 0.01). At 24 months, overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and specific survival (SS) were significantly better in arm B. OS: 37.8% arm B vs. 20.1% arm A (p = 0.038); DFS: 48.2% vs. 25.2% (p = 0.002); SS: 44.5% vs. 30.2% (p 0.021). No significant difference between the two arms in the amount of side effects at 1more » and 2 years. Conclusion: For these unresectable cases, chemoradiation provides better outcome than radiation alone, even with an 'aggressive' dose-intensity radiotherapy schedule.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [4];  [3];  [10];  [11];  [12];  [2];  [8];  [13];  [3] more »;  [14] « less
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France). E-mail: rene-jean.bensadoun@nice.fnclcc.fr
  2. Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France)
  3. Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France)
  4. Department of Statistics Unit, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France)
  5. Centre Val d'Aurelle-Paul Lamarque, Montpellier (France)
  6. Centre Rene-Gauducheau, Nantes (France)
  7. Centre Jean-Perrin, Clermont-Ferrand (France)
  8. Department of Medical Oncology, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France)
  9. Department of Radiology, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France)
  10. Centre Henri-Becquerel, Rouen (France)
  11. Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille (France)
  12. Centre Francois-Baclesse, Caen (France)
  13. Department of Otolaryngology, University Hospital, Nice (France)
  14. Hopital Jean Bretonneau, Tours (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20793373
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 64; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2005.09.041; PII: S0360-3016(05)02712-4; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ARMS; CARCINOMAS; CHEMOTHERAPY; CLINICAL TRIALS; INFUSION; NUTRITION; PATIENTS; RADIOTHERAPY; SIDE EFFECTS; URACILS

Citation Formats

Bensadoun, Rene-Jean, Benezery, Karen, Dassonville, Olivier, Magne, Nicolas, Poissonnet, Gilles, Ramaioli, Alain, Lemanski, Claire, Bourdin, Sylvain, Tortochaux, Jacques, Peyrade, Frederic, Marcy, Pierre-Yves, Chamorey, Emmanuel Phar, Vallicioni, Jacques, Seng Hang, Alzieu, Claude, Gery, Bernard, Chauvel, Pierre, Schneider, Maurice, Santini, Jose, Demard, Francois, and Calais, Gilles. French multicenter phase III randomized study testing concurrent twice-a-day radiotherapy and cisplatin/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (BiRCF) in unresectable pharyngeal carcinoma: Results at 2 years (FNCLCC-GORTEC). United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
Bensadoun, Rene-Jean, Benezery, Karen, Dassonville, Olivier, Magne, Nicolas, Poissonnet, Gilles, Ramaioli, Alain, Lemanski, Claire, Bourdin, Sylvain, Tortochaux, Jacques, Peyrade, Frederic, Marcy, Pierre-Yves, Chamorey, Emmanuel Phar, Vallicioni, Jacques, Seng Hang, Alzieu, Claude, Gery, Bernard, Chauvel, Pierre, Schneider, Maurice, Santini, Jose, Demard, Francois, & Calais, Gilles. French multicenter phase III randomized study testing concurrent twice-a-day radiotherapy and cisplatin/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (BiRCF) in unresectable pharyngeal carcinoma: Results at 2 years (FNCLCC-GORTEC). United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
Bensadoun, Rene-Jean, Benezery, Karen, Dassonville, Olivier, Magne, Nicolas, Poissonnet, Gilles, Ramaioli, Alain, Lemanski, Claire, Bourdin, Sylvain, Tortochaux, Jacques, Peyrade, Frederic, Marcy, Pierre-Yves, Chamorey, Emmanuel Phar, Vallicioni, Jacques, Seng Hang, Alzieu, Claude, Gery, Bernard, Chauvel, Pierre, Schneider, Maurice, Santini, Jose, Demard, Francois, and Calais, Gilles. Wed . "French multicenter phase III randomized study testing concurrent twice-a-day radiotherapy and cisplatin/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (BiRCF) in unresectable pharyngeal carcinoma: Results at 2 years (FNCLCC-GORTEC)". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
@article{osti_20793373,
title = {French multicenter phase III randomized study testing concurrent twice-a-day radiotherapy and cisplatin/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (BiRCF) in unresectable pharyngeal carcinoma: Results at 2 years (FNCLCC-GORTEC)},
author = {Bensadoun, Rene-Jean and Benezery, Karen and Dassonville, Olivier and Magne, Nicolas and Poissonnet, Gilles and Ramaioli, Alain and Lemanski, Claire and Bourdin, Sylvain and Tortochaux, Jacques and Peyrade, Frederic and Marcy, Pierre-Yves and Chamorey, Emmanuel Phar and Vallicioni, Jacques and Seng Hang and Alzieu, Claude and Gery, Bernard and Chauvel, Pierre and Schneider, Maurice and Santini, Jose and Demard, Francois and Calais, Gilles},
abstractNote = {Background: Unresectable carcinomas of the oropharynx and hypopharynx still have a poor long-term prognosis. Following a previous phase II study, this phase III multicenter trial was conducted between November 1997 and March 2002. Methods: Nontreated, strictly unresectable cases were eligible. Twice-daily radiation: two fractions of 1.2 Gy/day, 5 days per week, with no split (D1{sup {yields}}D46). Total tumor doses: 80.4 Gy/46 day (oropharynx), 75.6 Gy/44 day (hypopharynx). Chemotherapy (arm B): Cisplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} (D1, D22, D43); 5FU, continuous infusion (D1{sup {yields}}D5), 750 mg/m{sup 2}/day cycle 1; 430 mg/m{sup 2}/day cycles 2 and 3. Results: A total of 163 evaluable patients. Grade 3-4 acute mucositis 82.6% arm B/69.5% arm A (NS); Grade 3-4 neutropenia 33.3% arm B/2.4% arm A (p < 0.05). Enteral nutrition through gastrostomy tube was more frequent in arm B before treatment and at 6 months (p < 0.01). At 24 months, overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and specific survival (SS) were significantly better in arm B. OS: 37.8% arm B vs. 20.1% arm A (p = 0.038); DFS: 48.2% vs. 25.2% (p = 0.002); SS: 44.5% vs. 30.2% (p 0.021). No significant difference between the two arms in the amount of side effects at 1 and 2 years. Conclusion: For these unresectable cases, chemoradiation provides better outcome than radiation alone, even with an 'aggressive' dose-intensity radiotherapy schedule.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 4,
volume = 64,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Purpose: To clarify, in a multicenter, single-arm, phase 2 study (UMIN Clinical Trials Registry no. UMIN000001439), the clinical profile of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for cervical esophageal cancer. Patients and Methods: Patients with operable cervical esophageal cancer, excluding candidates for endoscopic resection, were enrolled. Protocol treatment consisted of CRT and adjuvant chemotherapy (CT). First, patients received concurrent CRT with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) plus cisplatin (CDDP). Chemotherapy consisted of 5-FU at 700 mg/m{sup 2} intravenous on days 1 to 4 and CDDP at 70 mg/m{sup 2} intravenous on day 1, repeated every 4 weeks for 2 cycles. Radiation therapy consisted of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. After completion ofmore » CRT, 2 additional cycles of CT with 5-FU (800 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1-5) and CDDP (80 mg/m{sup 2}, day 1) were repeated at a 4-week interval. The primary endpoint was 3-year overall survival. Results: Thirty patients were enrolled across 8 institutions in Japan, consisting of 26 men and 4 women with a median age of 64.5 years (range, 50-75 years). No grade 4 hematologic toxicity was seen in the CRT phase, and 1 grade 4 thrombocytopenia was seen in the CT phase. Grade 3 nonhematologic acute toxicities in the CRT phase were nausea (10%), mucositis (13.3%), and dysphagia (13.3%). No treatment-related death in either phase occurred. Overall complete response rate was 73%, and 3-year overall and laryngectomy-free survival were 66.5% and 52.5%, respectively. Regarding T4 disease, 3-year overall and laryngectomy-free survival were 58.3% and 38.5%, respectively. Conclusions: This study, the first prospective study for cervical esophageal cancer, showed that CRT has sufficient efficacy and safety for use as an alternative to surgery for these patients.« less
  • Purpose: To prospectively compare the rates of pathologic response, acute toxicity, and sphincter preservation with two different schedules of preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with cT3 mid-distal rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT3 and/or N+ resectable rectal carcinoma were randomized to receive one of the two following chemoradiotherapy regimens: cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and radiotherapy (PLAFUR) or raltitrexed, oxaliplatin, and radiotherapy (TOMOX-RT). For PLAFUR, cisplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2}) was given on Days 1 and 29, with a prolonged infusion of 5-fluorouracil (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1-4 and 29-32, plus concurrent radiotherapy (50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions daily). For TOMOX-RT, raltitrexedmore » (3 mg/m{sup 2}) and oxaliplatin (130 mg/m{sup 2}) was given on Days 1, 19, and 38 with the same radiotherapy regimen as used for PLAFUR. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks after completion of chemoradiotherapy. All pathologic specimens were reviewed by a designated expert pathologist. The primary endpoint of this study was pathologic tumor downstaging (defined as tumor regression grade 1-2). Secondary endpoints included the incidence of ypT0, clinical tumor downstaging, sphincter-saving surgery, and acute treatment-related toxicity. Results: Between 2002 and 2005, 164 patients were accrued in 10 Italian centers, 83 patients in the PLAFUR arm and 81 in the TOMOX-RT arm. Overall, tumor regression grade 1-2 was observed in 76 patients (46.4%) and ypT0 in 49 (29.9%). The tumor regression grade 1-2 rate was 41.0% vs. 51.9% (p = 0.162) and the ypT0 rate was 24.1% vs. 35.8% (p = 0.102) for the PLAFUR vs. TOMOX-RT arm, respectively. The overall rate of tumor regression grade 1 and ypN+ was 4.6%. The occurrence of ypT downstaging was significantly greater in the TOMOX-RT arm (p = 0.035). Grade 3-4 acute toxicity occurred in 19 patients (11.6%): 7.1% in the PLAFUR arm vs. 16.4% in the TOMOX-RT arm. Sphincter-saving surgery was performed in 143 patients (87.2%) overall: 87.9% in the PLAFUR arm and 86.4% in the TOMOX-RT arm. Conclusions: Compared with the PLAFUR regimen, TOMOX-RT achieved a greater incidence of downstaging but was associated with a correspondingly greater rate of acute Grade 3+ toxicity. With longer follow-up, the local control and survival rates might offer additional guidance as to the choice of regimen.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate, in a multicenter study, the tolerance of induction chemotherapy (ICT) and external radiotherapy (ERT) with concomitant cetuximab in the treatment of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and Methods: Clinical data from 46 patients with Stage III or IV nonmetastatic SCCHN who received docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil as ICT, followed by ERT with concomitant cetuximab, were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical safety (weight, allergy, mucositis, and dermatitis) and paraclinical safety (levels of hemoglobin, polynuclear neutrophils, and creatinine clearance) were studied. The primary objective was the proportion of patients who completed the protocol. Results:more » The percentage of patients completing ICT was 73.9%, ERT 93.5%, and cetuximab 69.6%. Induction chemotherapy was better tolerated than that previously reported. The rates of temporary suspensions of radiation (39.1%, mean duration of 13 days) and hospitalization (26.1%) during ERT with concomitant cetuximab were high. Weight loss during treatment (21.4% of patients lost >10% of their body weight), radiodermatitis, and radiomucositis were the main causes of temporary suspension of treatment, although Grade 4 dermatitis was not experienced. There were no allergic reactions to cetuximab. Conclusion: The completed protocol rate for SCCHN patients receiving ICT and ERT with concomitant cetuximab is high and the toxicity acceptable. Future improvements to protocol will be possible through early action and systematic implementation of nutritional support coupled with antibiotic treatment upon the first signs of radiodermatitis. These data could be useful for prospective studies on the safety and efficacy of this protocol.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose in concurrent three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with chemotherapy for unresectable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: Eligible patients with unresectable Stage III NSCLC, age {>=}20 years, performance status 0-1, percent of volume of normal lung receiving 20 GY or more (V{sub 20}) {<=}30% received three to four cycles of cisplatin (80 mg/m{sup 2} Day 1) and vinorelbine (20 mg/m{sup 2} Days 1 and 8) repeated every 4 weeks. The doses of 3D-CRT were 66 Gy, 72 Gy, and 78 Gy at dose levels 1 to 3, respectively. Results: Of themore » 17, 16, and 24 patients assessed for eligibility, 13 (76%), 12 (75%), and 6 (25%) were enrolled at dose levels 1 to 3, respectively. The main reasons for exclusion were V{sub 20} >30% (n = 10) and overdose to the esophagus (n = 8) and brachial plexus (n = 2). There were 26 men and 5 women, with a median age of 60 years (range, 41-75). The full planned dose of radiotherapy could be administered to all the patients. Grade 3-4 neutropenia and febrile neutropenia were noted in 24 (77%) and 5 (16%) of the 31 patients, respectively. Grade 4 infection, Grade 3 esophagitis, and Grade 3 pulmonary toxicity were noted in 1 patient, 2 patients, and 1 patient, respectively. The dose-limiting toxicity was noted in 17% of the patients at each dose level. The median survival and 3-year and 4-year survival rates were 41.9 months, 72.3%, and 49.2%, respectively. Conclusions: 72 Gy was the maximum dose that could be achieved in most patients, given the predetermined normal tissue constraints.« less
  • Purpose: The INT0116 study has established postoperative chemoradiotherapy as the standard of care for completely resected gastric adenocarcinoma. However, the optimal chemoradiation regimen remains to be defined. We conducted a prospective, multicenter study to evaluate an alternative chemoradiation regimen that combines more current systemic treatment with modern techniques of radiotherapy delivery. Methods and Materials: Patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach who had undergone an R0 resection were eligible. Adjuvant therapy consisted of one cycle of epirubicin, cisplatin, and 5-FU (ECF), followed by radiotherapy with concurrent infusional 5-FU, and then two additional cycles of ECF. Radiotherapy was delivered using precisely defined,more » multiple-field, three-dimensional conformal techniques. Results: A total of 54 assessable patients were enrolled from 19 institutions. The proportion of patients commencing Cycles 1, 2, and 3 of ECF chemotherapy were 100%, 81%, and 67% respectively. In all, 94% of patients who received radiotherapy completed treatment as planned. Grade 3/4 neutropenia occurred in 66% of patients with 7.4% developing febrile neutropenia. Most neutropenic episodes (83%) occurred in the post-radiotherapy period during cycles 2 and 3 of ECF. Grade 3/4 gastrointestinal toxicity occurred in 28% of patients. In all, 35% of radiotherapy treatment plans contained protocol deviations that were satisfactorily amended before commencement of treatment. At median follow-up of 36 months, the 3-year overall survival rate was estimated at 61.6%. Conclusions: This adjuvant regimen using ECF before and after three-dimensional conformal chemoradiation is feasible and can be safely delivered in a cooperative group setting. A regimen similar to this is currently being compared with the INT0116 regimen in a National Cancer Institute-sponsored, randomized Phase III trial.« less