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Title: Stereotactic radiosurgery for four or more intracranial metastases

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes after a single stereotactic radiosurgery procedure for the care of patients with 4 or more intracranial metastases. Methods and Materials: Two hundred five patients with primary malignancies, including non-small-cell lung carcinoma (42%), breast carcinoma (23%), melanoma (17%), renal cell carcinoma (6%), colon cancer (3%), and others (10%) underwent gamma knife radiosurgery for 4 or more intracranial metastases at one time. The median number of brain metastases was 5 (range, 4-18) with a median total treatment volume of 6.8 cc (range, 0.6-51.0 cc). Radiosurgery was used as sole management (17% of patients), or in combination with whole brain radiotherapy (46%) or after failure of whole brain radiotherapy (38%). The median marginal radiosurgery dose was 16 Gy (range, 12-20 Gy). The mean follow-up was 8 months. Results: The median overall survival after radiosurgery for all patients was 8 months. The 1-year local control rate was 71%, and the median time to progressive/new brain metastases was 9 months. Using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) classification system, the median overall survivals for RPA classes I, II, and III were 18, 9, and 3 months, respectively (p < 0.00001). Multivariate analysis revealed total treatment volume, age,more » RPA classification, and marginal dose as significant prognostic factors. The number of metastases was not statistically significant (p 0.333). Conclusion: Radiosurgery seems to provide survival benefit for patients with 4 or more intracranial metastases. Because total treatment volume was the most significant predictor of survival, the total volume of brain metastases, rather than the number of metastases, should be considered in identifying appropriate radiosurgery candidates.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [1];  [3]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)
  2. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States) and Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). E-mail: flickingerjc@upmc.edu
  3. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20793362
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 64; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2005.08.035; PII: S0360-3016(05)02580-0; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BRAIN; FAILURES; LARGE INTESTINE; LUNGS; MAMMARY GLANDS; MELANOMAS; METASTASES; MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS; PATIENTS; RADIOTHERAPY; SURGERY

Citation Formats

Bhatnagar, Ajay K., Flickinger, John C., Kondziolka, Douglas, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, Lunsford, L. Dade, and Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA. Stereotactic radiosurgery for four or more intracranial metastases. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
Bhatnagar, Ajay K., Flickinger, John C., Kondziolka, Douglas, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, Lunsford, L. Dade, & Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA. Stereotactic radiosurgery for four or more intracranial metastases. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
Bhatnagar, Ajay K., Flickinger, John C., Kondziolka, Douglas, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, Lunsford, L. Dade, and Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA. Wed . "Stereotactic radiosurgery for four or more intracranial metastases". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
@article{osti_20793362,
title = {Stereotactic radiosurgery for four or more intracranial metastases},
author = {Bhatnagar, Ajay K. and Flickinger, John C. and Kondziolka, Douglas and Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA and Lunsford, L. Dade and Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes after a single stereotactic radiosurgery procedure for the care of patients with 4 or more intracranial metastases. Methods and Materials: Two hundred five patients with primary malignancies, including non-small-cell lung carcinoma (42%), breast carcinoma (23%), melanoma (17%), renal cell carcinoma (6%), colon cancer (3%), and others (10%) underwent gamma knife radiosurgery for 4 or more intracranial metastases at one time. The median number of brain metastases was 5 (range, 4-18) with a median total treatment volume of 6.8 cc (range, 0.6-51.0 cc). Radiosurgery was used as sole management (17% of patients), or in combination with whole brain radiotherapy (46%) or after failure of whole brain radiotherapy (38%). The median marginal radiosurgery dose was 16 Gy (range, 12-20 Gy). The mean follow-up was 8 months. Results: The median overall survival after radiosurgery for all patients was 8 months. The 1-year local control rate was 71%, and the median time to progressive/new brain metastases was 9 months. Using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) classification system, the median overall survivals for RPA classes I, II, and III were 18, 9, and 3 months, respectively (p < 0.00001). Multivariate analysis revealed total treatment volume, age, RPA classification, and marginal dose as significant prognostic factors. The number of metastases was not statistically significant (p 0.333). Conclusion: Radiosurgery seems to provide survival benefit for patients with 4 or more intracranial metastases. Because total treatment volume was the most significant predictor of survival, the total volume of brain metastases, rather than the number of metastases, should be considered in identifying appropriate radiosurgery candidates.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 3,
volume = 64,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Purpose: In patients who undergo resection of central nervous system metastases, whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is added to reduce the rates of recurrence and neurologic death. However, the risk of late neurotoxicity has led many patients to decline WBRT. We offered adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) as an alternative to select patients with resected brain metastases. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of patients who underwent brain metastasis resection followed by SRS/SRT. WBRT was administered only as salvage treatment. Patients had one to four brain metastases. The dose was 15-18 Gy for SRS and 22-27.5more » Gy in four to six fractions for SRT. Target margins were typically expanded by 1 mm for rigid immobilization and 3 mm for mask immobilization. SRS/SRT involved the use of linear accelerator radiosurgery using the IMRT 21EX or Helical Tomotherapy unit. Results: Between December 1999 and January 2007, 30 patients diagnosed with intracranial metastases were treated with resection followed by SRS or SRT to the resection cavity. Of the 30 patients, 4 (13.3%) developed recurrence in the resection cavity, and 19 (63%) developed recurrences in new intracranial sites. The actuarial 12-month survival rate was 82% for local recurrence-free survival, 31% for freedom from new brain metastases, 67% for neurologic deficit-free survival, and 51% for overall survival. Salvage WBRT was performed in 14 (47%) of the 30 patients. Conclusion: Our results suggest that for patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases treated with surgical resection, postoperative SRS/SRT to the resection cavity is a feasible option. WBRT can be reserved as salvage treatment with acceptable neurologic deficit-free survival.« less
  • Purpose: After preclinical investigations confirming the accuracy of target localization by frameless image-guided radiosurgery, we report the clinical outcomes of patients with brain metastases who underwent frameless radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2006, 53 patients underwent frameless stereotactic radiosurgery using a linear accelerator equipped with on-board image guidance for the treatment of 158 brain metastases. The radiation doses were delivered in a single fraction (dose range, 12-22 Gy; median, 18). Patients were followed with magnetic resonance imaging scans at 2-3-month intervals. Progression-free survival was the primary study endpoint. Results: With a median follow-up of 38 weeks (range, 14-112),more » the overall survival rate was 70% at 6 months, 44% at 1 year, 29% at 18 months, and 16% at 24 months. Local control was achieved in 90% of 168 treated lesions at 6 months, 80% at 12 months, 78% at 18 months, and 78% at 24 months. Local control tended to be improved in lesions treated with {>=}18 Gy and for lesions <0.2 cm{sup 3}. Adverse events occurred in 5 patients (9.6%). No evidence of imaging changes on post-stereotactic radiosurgery scans was found to suggest mistargeting of a radiation isocenter. Conclusion: The clinical outcomes after frameless stereotactic radiosurgery were comparable to those after frame-based radiosurgery techniques. Given its significant advantages in terms of patient comfort, ability to use fractionated treatment regimens, and convenience in scheduling of personnel and equipment resources, frameless radiosurgery will likely become a common technique for intracranial radiosurgery.« less
  • Purpose: Single-isocenter VMAT has been shown able to create high quality plans for complex intracranial multiple metastasis SRS cases. Linacs capable of the technique are typically outfitted with an MLC that consists of a combination of 5 mm and 10 mm leaves (standard) or 2.5 mm and 5 mm leaves (high-definition). In this study, we test the hypothesis that thinner collimator leaves are associated with improved plan quality. Methods: Ten multiple metastasis cases were identified and planned for VMAT SRS using a 10 MV flattening filter free beam. Plans were created for a standard (std) and a high-definition (HD) MLC.more » Published values for leaf transmission factor and dosimetric leaf gap were utilized. All other parameters were invariant. Conformity (plan and individual target), moderate isodose spill (V50%), and low isodose spill (mean brain dose) were selected for analysis. Results: Compared to standard MLC, HD-MLC improved overall plan conformity (median: Paddick CI-HD = 0.83, Paddick CI-std = 0.79; p = 0.004 and median: RTOG CI-HD =1.18, RTOG CI-std =1.24; p = 0.01 ), improved individual lesion conformity (median: Paddick CI-HD,i =0.77, Paddick CI-std,i =0.72; p < 0.001 and median: RTOG CI-HD,i = 1.28, RTOG CI-std,i =1.35; p < 0.001), improved moderate isodose spill (median: V50%-HD = 37.0 cc, V50%-std = 45.7 cc; p = 0.002), and improved low dose spill (median: dmean-HD = 2.90 Gy, dmean-std = 3.19 Gy; p = 0.002). Conclusion: For the single-isocenter VMAT SRS of multiple metastasis plans examined, use of HD-MLC modestly improved conformity, moderate isodose, and low isodose spill compared to standard MLC. However, in all cases we were able to generate clinically acceptable plans with the standard MLC. More work is need to further quantify the difference in cases with higher numbers of small targets and to better understand any potential clinical significance. This research was supported in part by Varian Medical Systems.« less
  • Purpose: To examine the outcomes of patients with five or more brain metastases treated in a single session with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Sixty-four patients with brain metastases treated with SRS to five or more lesions in a single session were reviewed. Primary disease type, number of lesions, Karnofsky performance score (KPS) at SRS, and status of primary and systemic disease at SRS were included. Patients were treated using dosing as defined by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 90-05, with adjustments for critical structures. We defined prior whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) as WBRT completed >1 month before SRS andmore » concurrent WBRT as WBRT completed within 1 month before or after SRS. Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazard regression were used to determine which patient and treatment factors predicted overall survival (OS). Results: The median OS after SRS was 7.5 months. The median KPS was 80 (range, 60-100). A KPS of {>=}80 significantly influenced OS (median OS, 4.8 months for KPS {<=}70 vs. 8.8 months for KPS {>=}80, p = 0.0097). The number of lesions treated did not significantly influence OS (median OS, 6.6 months for eight or fewer lesions vs. 9.9 months for more than eight, p = nonsignificant). Primary site histology did not significantly influence median OS. On multivariate Cox modeling, KPS and prior WBRT significantly predicted for OS. Whole-brain radiotherapy before SRS compared with concurrent WBRT significantly influenced survival, with a risk ratio of 0.423 (95% confidence interval 0.191-0.936, p = 0.0338). No significant differences were observed when no WBRT was compared with concurrent WBRT or when the no WBRT group was compared with prior WBRT. A KPS of {<=}70 predicted for poorer outcomes, with a risk ratio of 2.164 (95% confidence interval 1.157-4.049, p = 0.0157). Conclusions: Stereotactic radiosurgery to five or more brain lesions is an effective treatment option for patients with metastatic cancer, especially for patients previously treated with WBRT. A KPS of {>=}80 predicts for an improved outcome.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate dose conformity, dose homogeneity, and dose gradient in helical tomotherapy treatment plans for stereotactic radiosurgery, and compare results with step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS) treatment plans. Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients were selected with a mean tumor size of 14.65 {+-} 11.2 cm{sup 3}. Original step-and-shoot IMRS treatment plans used coplanar fields because of the constraint of the beam stopper. Retrospective step-and-shoot IMRS plans were generated using noncoplanar fields. Helical tomotherapy treatment plans were generated using the tomotherapy planning station. Dose conformity index, dose gradient score index, and homogeneity index were used in plan intercomparisons. Results: Noncoplanar IMRSmore » plans increased dose conformity and dose gradient, but not dose homogeneity, compared with coplanar IMRS plans. Tomotherapy plans increased dose conformity and dose gradient, yet increased dose heterogeneity compared with noncoplanar IMRS plans. The average dose conformity index values were 1.53 {+-} 0.38, 1.35 {+-} 0.15, and 1.26 {+-} 0.10 in coplanar IMRS, noncoplanar IMRS, and tomotherapy plans, respectively. The average dose homogeneity index values were 1.15 {+-} 0.05, 1.13 {+-} 0.04, and 1.18 {+-} 0.09 in coplanar IMRS, noncoplanar IMRS, and tomotherapy plans, respectively. The mean dose gradient score index values were 1.37 {+-} 19.08, 22.32 {+-} 19.20, and 43.28 {+-} 13.78 in coplanar IMRS, noncoplanar IMRS, and tomotherapy plans, respectively. The mean treatment time in tomotherapy was 42 {+-} 16 min. Conclusions: We were able to achieve better dose conformity and dose gradient in tomotherapy plans compared with step-and-shoot IMRS plans for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery. However, tomotherapy treatment time was significantly larger than that in step-and-shoot IMRS.« less