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Title: Clinical investigation survival prediction in high-grade gliomas by MRI perfusion before and during early stage of RT

Abstract

Purpose: To determine whether cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow can predict the response of high-grade gliomas to radiotherapy (RT) by taking into account spatial heterogeneity and temporal changes in perfusion. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients with high-grade gliomas underwent conformal RT, with magnetic resonance imaging perfusion before and at Weeks 1-2 and 3-4 during RT. Tumor perfusion was classified as high, medium, or low. The prognostic values of pre-RT perfusion and the changes during RT for early prediction of tumor response to RT were evaluated. Results: The fractional high-CBV tumor volume before RT and the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging tumor volume were identified as predictors for survival (p = 0.01). Changes in tumor CBV during the early treatment course also predicted for survival. Better survival was predicted by a decrease in the fractional low-CBV tumor volume at Week 1 of RT vs. before RT, a decrease in the fractional high-CBV tumor volume at Week 3 vs. Week 1 of RT, and a smaller pre-RT fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging tumor volume (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Early temporal changes during RT in heterogeneous regions of high and low perfusion in gliomas might predict for different physiologic responses to RT.more » This might also open the opportunity to identify tumor subvolumes that are radioresistant and might benefit from intensified RT.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [4];  [4];  [2]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States) and Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). E-mail: yuecao@med.umich.edu
  2. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
  3. Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
  4. Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20793359
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 64; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2005.09.001; PII: S0360-3016(05)02592-7; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BLOOD; BLOOD FLOW; FORECASTING; GLIOMAS; NMR IMAGING; PATIENTS; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Cao Yue, Tsien, Christina I., Nagesh, Vijaya, Junck, Larry, Haken, Randall ten, Ross, Brian D., Chenevert, Thomas L., and Lawrence, Theodore S. Clinical investigation survival prediction in high-grade gliomas by MRI perfusion before and during early stage of RT. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
Cao Yue, Tsien, Christina I., Nagesh, Vijaya, Junck, Larry, Haken, Randall ten, Ross, Brian D., Chenevert, Thomas L., & Lawrence, Theodore S. Clinical investigation survival prediction in high-grade gliomas by MRI perfusion before and during early stage of RT. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
Cao Yue, Tsien, Christina I., Nagesh, Vijaya, Junck, Larry, Haken, Randall ten, Ross, Brian D., Chenevert, Thomas L., and Lawrence, Theodore S. Wed . "Clinical investigation survival prediction in high-grade gliomas by MRI perfusion before and during early stage of RT". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
@article{osti_20793359,
title = {Clinical investigation survival prediction in high-grade gliomas by MRI perfusion before and during early stage of RT},
author = {Cao Yue and Tsien, Christina I. and Nagesh, Vijaya and Junck, Larry and Haken, Randall ten and Ross, Brian D. and Chenevert, Thomas L. and Lawrence, Theodore S.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To determine whether cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow can predict the response of high-grade gliomas to radiotherapy (RT) by taking into account spatial heterogeneity and temporal changes in perfusion. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients with high-grade gliomas underwent conformal RT, with magnetic resonance imaging perfusion before and at Weeks 1-2 and 3-4 during RT. Tumor perfusion was classified as high, medium, or low. The prognostic values of pre-RT perfusion and the changes during RT for early prediction of tumor response to RT were evaluated. Results: The fractional high-CBV tumor volume before RT and the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging tumor volume were identified as predictors for survival (p = 0.01). Changes in tumor CBV during the early treatment course also predicted for survival. Better survival was predicted by a decrease in the fractional low-CBV tumor volume at Week 1 of RT vs. before RT, a decrease in the fractional high-CBV tumor volume at Week 3 vs. Week 1 of RT, and a smaller pre-RT fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging tumor volume (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Early temporal changes during RT in heterogeneous regions of high and low perfusion in gliomas might predict for different physiologic responses to RT. This might also open the opportunity to identify tumor subvolumes that are radioresistant and might benefit from intensified RT.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 3,
volume = 64,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Purpose: Although many outcome prediction models based on dose-volume information have been proposed, it is well known that the prognosis may be affected also by multiple clinical factors. The purpose of this study is to predict the survival time after radiotherapy for high-grade glioma patients based on features including clinical and dose-volume histogram (DVH) information. Methods: A total of 35 patients with high-grade glioma (oligodendroglioma: 2, anaplastic astrocytoma: 3, glioblastoma: 30) were selected in this study. All patients were treated with prescribed dose of 30–80 Gy after surgical resection or biopsy from 2006 to 2013 at The University of Tokyomore » Hospital. All cases were randomly separated into training dataset (30 cases) and test dataset (5 cases). The survival time after radiotherapy was predicted based on a multiple linear regression analysis and artificial neural network (ANN) by using 204 candidate features. The candidate features included the 12 clinical features (tumor location, extent of surgical resection, treatment duration of radiotherapy, etc.), and the 192 DVH features (maximum dose, minimum dose, D95, V60, etc.). The effective features for the prediction were selected according to a step-wise method by using 30 training cases. The prediction accuracy was evaluated by a coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) between the predicted and actual survival time for the training and test dataset. Results: In the multiple regression analysis, the value of R{sup 2} between the predicted and actual survival time was 0.460 for the training dataset and 0.375 for the test dataset. On the other hand, in the ANN analysis, the value of R{sup 2} was 0.806 for the training dataset and 0.811 for the test dataset. Conclusion: Although a large number of patients would be needed for more accurate and robust prediction, our preliminary Result showed the potential to predict the outcome in the patients with high-grade glioma. This work was partly supported by the JSPS Core-to-Core Program(No. 23003) and Grant-in-aid from the JSPS Fellows.« less
  • Purpose: To report preliminary clinical and dosimetric data from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: Fifty-eight consecutive high-grade gliomas were treated between January 2001 and December 2003 with dynamic multileaf collimator IMRT, planned with the inverse approach. A dose of 59.4-60 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction was delivered. A total of three to five noncoplanar beams were used to cover at least 95% of the target volume with the prescription isodose line. Glioblastoma accounted for 70% of the cases, and anaplastic oligodendroglioma histology (pure or mixed) was seen in 15% of the cases. Surgery consisted ofmore » biopsy only in 26% of the patients, and 80% received adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 24 months, 85% of the patients have relapsed. The median progression-free survival time for anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma histology was 5.6 and 2.5 months, respectively. The overall survival time for anaplastic glioma and glioblastoma was 36 and 9 months, respectively. Ninety-six percent of the recurrences were local. No Grade IV/V late neurologic toxicities were noted. A comparative dosimetric analysis revealed that regardless of tumor location, IMRT did not significantly improve target coverage compared with three-dimensional planning. However, IMRT resulted in a decreased maximum dose to the spinal cord, optic nerves, and eye by 16%, 7%, and 15%, respectively, owing to its improved dose conformality. The mean brainstem dose also decreased by 7%. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy delivered with a limited number of beams did not result in an increased dose to the normal brain. Conclusions: It is unlikely that IMRT will improve local control in high-grade gliomas without further dose escalation compared with conventional radiotherapy. However, it might result in decreased late toxicities associated with radiotherapy.« less
  • Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the tumor vascularity assessed by perfusion CT for prediction of chemo-radiation treatment (CRT) response in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods: Eighteen consecutive patients (61.9±8.8 years, from March–June 2015) diagnosed with LARC who underwent 6–8 weeks CRT followed by surgery were included. The pre-treatment perfusion CT was acquired after a 5s delay of contrast agent injection for 45s with 1s interval. A total of 7-cm craniocaudal range covered the tumor region with 3-mm slice thickness. The effective radiation dose is around 15mSv, which is about 1.5 the conventional abdomen/pelvis CT dose. The parametric map of bloodmore » flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT), permeability (PMB), and maximum intensity map (MIP) were obtained from commercial software (Syngo-CT 2011A, Siemens). An experienced radiation oncologist outlined the tumor based on the pre-operative MR and pathologic residual region, but was blinded with regards to pathological tumor stage. The perfusion parameters were compared to histopathological response quantified by tumor regression grade as good-responder (GR, TRG 0-1) vs. non-good responder (non-GR). Furthermore, the predictive value for pathological complete response (pCR) was also investigated. Results: Both BV (p=0.02) and MTT (P=0.02) was significantly higher and permeambility was lower (p=0.004) in the good responders. The BF was higher in GR group but not statistically significant. Regarding the discrimination of pCR vs non-pCR, the BF was higher in the pCR group (p=0.08) but none of those parameters showed statistically significant differences. Conclusion: BV and MTT can discriminate patients with a favorable response from those that fail to respond well, potentially selecting high-risk patients with resistant tumors that may benefit from an aggressive preoperative treatment approach. However, future studies with more patient data are needed to verify the prognostic value of perfusion CT especially for pCR prediction. This work is supported by the National High-tech R&D program for Young Scientists by the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2015AA020917), Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC Grant No. 81201091).« less
  • Objective: To determine whether changes in tumor volume occur during the course of conformal 3D radiotherapy of high-grade gliomas by use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during treatment and whether these changes had an impact on tumor coverage. Methods and Materials: Between December 2000 and January 2004, 21 patients with WHO Grades 3 to 4 supratentorial malignant gliomas treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy (median dose, 70 Gy) were enrolled in a prospective clinical study. All patients underwent T1-weighted contrast-enhancing and T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging at approximately 1 to 2 weeks before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy (Weeks 1 andmore » 3), and at routine intervals thereafter. All MRI scans were coregistered to the treatment-planning CT. Gross tumor volume (GTV Pre-Rx) was defined from a postoperative T1-weighted contrast-enhancing MRI performed 1 to 2 weeks before start of radiotherapy. A second GTV (GTV Week 3) was defined by use of an MRI performed during Week 3 of radiotherapy. A uniform 0.5 cm expansion of the respective GTV, PTV (Pre-Rx), and PTV (Week 3) was applied to the final boost plan. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were used to analyze any potential adverse changes in tumor coverage based on Week 3 MRI. Results: All MRI scans were reviewed independently by a neuroradiologist (DGH). Two patients were noted to have multifocal disease at presentation and were excluded from analysis. In 19 cases, changes in the GTV based on MRI at Week 3 during radiotherapy were as follows: 2 cases had an objective decrease in GTV ({>=}50%); 12 cases revealed a slight decrease in the rim enhancement or changes in cystic appearance of the GTV; 2 cases showed no change in GTV; and 3 cases demonstrated an increase in tumor volume. Both cases with objective decreases in GTV during treatment were Grade 3 tumors. No cases of tumor progression were noted in Grade 3 tumors during treatment. In comparison, three of 12 Grade 4 tumors had tumor progression, based on MRI obtained during Week 3 of radiotherapy. Median increase in GTV (Week 3) was 11.7 cc (range, 9.8-21.3). Retrospective DVH analysis of PTV (Pre-Rx) and PTV (Week 3) demonstrated a decrease in V{sub 95%}(PTV volume receiving 95% of the prescribed dose) in those 3 cases. Conclusions: Routine MR imaging during radiotherapy may be essential in ensuring tumor coverage if highly conformal radiotherapy techniques such as stereotactic boost and intensity-modulated radiotherapy are used in dose-escalation trials that utilize smaller treatment margins.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the ability of pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE- MRI) acquired before and during concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy to predict clinical response in patients with head and neck cancer. Methods: Eleven patients underwent a DCE-MRI scan at three time points: 1–2 weeks before treatment, 4–5 weeks after treatment initiation, and 3–4 months after treatment completion. Post-processing of MRI data included correction to reduce motion artifacts. The arterial input function was obtained by measuring the dynamic tracer concentration in the jugular veins. The volume transfer constant (Ktrans), extracellular extravascular volume fraction (ve), rate constant (Kep;more » Kep = Ktrans/ve), and plasma volume fraction (vp) were computed for primary tumors and cervical nodal masses. Patients were categorized into two groups based on response to therapy at 3–4 months: responders (no evidence of disease) and partial responders (regression of disease). Responses of the primary tumor and nodes were evaluated separately. A linear classifier and receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were used to determine the best model for discrimination of responders from partial responders. Results: When the above pharmacokinetic parameters of the primary tumor measured before and during treatment were incorporated into the linear classifier, a discriminative accuracy of 88.9%, with sensitivity =100% and specificity = 66.7%, was observed between responders (n=6) and partial responders (n=3) for the primary tumor with the corresponding accuracy = 44.4%, sensitivity = 66.7%, and specificity of 0% for nodal masses. When only pre-treatment parameters were used, the accuracy decreased to 66.7%, with sensitivity = 66.7% and specificity = 66.7% for the primary tumor and decreased to 33.3%, sensitivity of 50%, and specificity of 0% for nodal masses. Conclusion: Higher accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity were obtained using DCE-MRI-derived pharmacokinetic parameters acquired before and during treatment as compared with those derived from the pre-treatment time-point, exclusively.« less