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Title: Perfusion and diffusion MRI of glioblastoma progression in a four-year prospective temozolomide clinical trial

Abstract

Purpose: This study was performed to determine the impact of perfusion and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences on patients during treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Special emphasis has been given to these imaging technologies as tools to potentially anticipate disease progression, as progression-free survival is frequently used as a surrogate endpoint. Methods and Materials: Forty-one patients from a phase II temolozomide clinical trial were included. During follow-up, images were integrated 21 to 28 days after radiochemotherapy and every 2 months thereafter. Assessment of scans included measurement of size of lesion on T1 contrast-enhanced, T2, diffusion, and perfusion images, as well as mass effect. Classical criteria on tumor size variation and clinical parameters were used to set disease progression date. Results: A total of 311 MRI examinations were reviewed. At disease progression (32 patients), a multivariate Cox regression determined 2 significant survival parameters: T1 largest diameter (p < 0.02) and T2 size variation (p < 0.05), whereas perfusion and diffusion were not significant. Conclusion: Perfusion and diffusion techniques cannot be used to anticipate tumor progression. Decision making at disease progression is critical, and classical T1 and T2 imaging remain the gold standard. Specifically, a T1 contrast enhancement over 3 cmmore » in largest diameter together with an increased T2 hypersignal is a marker of inferior prognosis.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Radiology, Lausanne State and University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland)
  2. Department of Oncology, Multidisciplinary Center for Oncology, Lausanne State and University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland)
  3. Department of Radiology, Lausanne State and University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland). E-mail: Reto.Meuli@chuv.ch
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20793358
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 64; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2005.08.015; PII: S0360-3016(05)02339-4; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CLINICAL TRIALS; DECISION MAKING; GLIOMAS; IMAGES; MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS; NMR IMAGING; PATIENTS

Citation Formats

Leimgruber, Antoine, Ostermann, Sandrine, Yeon, Eun Jo, Buff, Evelyn, Maeder, Philippe P., Stupp, Roger, and Meuli, Reto A.. Perfusion and diffusion MRI of glioblastoma progression in a four-year prospective temozolomide clinical trial. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
Leimgruber, Antoine, Ostermann, Sandrine, Yeon, Eun Jo, Buff, Evelyn, Maeder, Philippe P., Stupp, Roger, & Meuli, Reto A.. Perfusion and diffusion MRI of glioblastoma progression in a four-year prospective temozolomide clinical trial. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
Leimgruber, Antoine, Ostermann, Sandrine, Yeon, Eun Jo, Buff, Evelyn, Maeder, Philippe P., Stupp, Roger, and Meuli, Reto A.. 2006. "Perfusion and diffusion MRI of glioblastoma progression in a four-year prospective temozolomide clinical trial". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
@article{osti_20793358,
title = {Perfusion and diffusion MRI of glioblastoma progression in a four-year prospective temozolomide clinical trial},
author = {Leimgruber, Antoine and Ostermann, Sandrine and Yeon, Eun Jo and Buff, Evelyn and Maeder, Philippe P. and Stupp, Roger and Meuli, Reto A.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: This study was performed to determine the impact of perfusion and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences on patients during treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Special emphasis has been given to these imaging technologies as tools to potentially anticipate disease progression, as progression-free survival is frequently used as a surrogate endpoint. Methods and Materials: Forty-one patients from a phase II temolozomide clinical trial were included. During follow-up, images were integrated 21 to 28 days after radiochemotherapy and every 2 months thereafter. Assessment of scans included measurement of size of lesion on T1 contrast-enhanced, T2, diffusion, and perfusion images, as well as mass effect. Classical criteria on tumor size variation and clinical parameters were used to set disease progression date. Results: A total of 311 MRI examinations were reviewed. At disease progression (32 patients), a multivariate Cox regression determined 2 significant survival parameters: T1 largest diameter (p < 0.02) and T2 size variation (p < 0.05), whereas perfusion and diffusion were not significant. Conclusion: Perfusion and diffusion techniques cannot be used to anticipate tumor progression. Decision making at disease progression is critical, and classical T1 and T2 imaging remain the gold standard. Specifically, a T1 contrast enhancement over 3 cm in largest diameter together with an increased T2 hypersignal is a marker of inferior prognosis.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 3,
volume = 64,
place = {United States},
year = 2006,
month = 3
}
  • Purpose: To quantify lung perfusion changes after breast/chest wall radiation therapy (RT) using pre- and post-RT single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) attenuation-corrected perfusion scans; and correlate decreased perfusion with adjuvant RT dose for breast cancer in a prospective clinical trial. Methods and Materials: As part of an institutional review board–approved trial studying the impact of RT technique on lung function in node-positive breast cancer, patients received breast/chest wall and regional nodal irradiation including superior internal mammary node RT to 50 to 52.2 Gy with a boost to the tumor bed/mastectomy scar. All patients underwent quantitative SPECT/CT lung perfusion scanningmore » before RT and 1 year after RT. The SPECT/CT scans were co-registered, and the ratio of decreased perfusion after RT relative to the pre-RT perfusion scan was calculated to allow for direct comparison of SPECT/CT perfusion changes with delivered RT dose. The average ratio of decreased perfusion was calculated in 10-Gy dose increments from 0 to 60 Gy. Results: Fifty patients had complete lung SPECT/CT perfusion data available. No patient developed symptoms consistent with pulmonary toxicity. Nearly all patients demonstrated decreased perfusion in the left lung according to voxel-based analyses. The average ratio of lung perfusion deficits increased for each 10-Gy increment in radiation dose to the lung, with the largest changes in regions of lung that received 50 to 60 Gy (ratio 0.72 [95% confidence interval 0.64-0.79], P<.001) compared with the 0- to 10-Gy region. For each increase in 10 Gy to the left lung, the lung perfusion ratio decreased by 0.06 (P<.001). Conclusions: In the assessment of 50 patients with node-positive breast cancer treated with RT in a prospective clinical trial, decreased lung perfusion by SPECT/CT was demonstrated. Our study allowed for quantification of lung perfusion defects in a prospective cohort of breast cancer patients for whom attenuation-corrected SPECT/CT scans could be registered directly to RT treatment fields for precise dose estimates.« less
  • Purpose: To assess the time and regional dependence of radiation therapy (RT)-induced reductions in regional lung perfusion 0.1-12 years post-RT, as measured by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) lung perfusion. Materials/Methods: Between 1991 and 2005, 123 evaluable patients receiving RT for tumors in/around the thorax underwent SPECT lung perfusion scans before and serially post-RT (0.1-12 years). Registration of pre- and post-RT SPECT images with the treatment planning computed tomography, and hence the three-dimensional RT dose distribution, allowed changes in regional SPECT-defined perfusion to be related to regional RT dose. Post-RT follow-up scans were evaluated at multiple time points tomore » determine the time course of RT-induced regional perfusion changes. Population dose response curves (DRC) for all patients at different time points, different regions, and subvolumes (e.g., whole lungs, cranial/caudal, ipsilateral/contralateral) were generated by combining data from multiple patients at similar follow-up times. Each DRC was fit to a linear model, and differences statistically analyzed. Results: In the overall groups, dose-dependent reductions in perfusion were seen at each time post-RT. The slope of the DRC increased over time up to 18 months post-RT, and plateaued thereafter. Regional differences in DRCs were only observed between the ipsilateral and contralateral lungs, and appeared due to tumor-associated changes in regional perfusion. Conclusions: Thoracic RT causes dose-dependent reductions in regional lung perfusion that progress up to {approx}18 months post-RT and persists thereafter. Tumor shrinkage appears to confound the observed dose-response relations. There appears to be similar dose response for healthy parts of the lungs at different locations.« less
  • Background: The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) functions within the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway as a critical modulator of cell survival. On the basis of promising preclinical data, the safety and tolerability of therapy with the mTOR inhibitor RAD001 in combination with radiation (RT) and temozolomide (TMZ) was evaluated in this Phase I study. Methods and Materials: All patients received weekly oral RAD001 in combination with standard chemoradiotherapy, followed by RAD001 in combination with standard adjuvant temozolomide. RAD001 was dose escalated in cohorts of 6 patients. Dose-limiting toxicities were defined during RAD001 combination therapy with TMZ/RT. Results: Eighteen patients were enrolled,more » with a median follow-up of 8.4 months. Combined therapy was well tolerated at all dose levels, with 1 patient on each dose level experiencing a dose-limiting toxicity: Grade 3 fatigue, Grade 4 hematologic toxicity, and Grade 4 liver dysfunction. Throughout therapy, there were no Grade 5 events, 3 patients experienced Grade 4 toxicities, and 6 patients had Grade 3 toxicities attributable to treatment. On the basis of these results, the recommended Phase II dosage currently being tested is RAD001 70 mg/week in combination with standard chemoradiotherapy. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography scans also were obtained at baseline and after the second RAD001 dose before the initiation of TMZ/RT; the change in FDG uptake between scans was calculated for each patient. Fourteen patients had stable metabolic disease, and 4 patients had a partial metabolic response. Conclusions: RAD001 in combination with RT/TMZ and adjuvant TMZ was reasonably well tolerated. Changes in tumor metabolism can be detected by FDG positron emission tomography in a subset of patients within days of initiating RAD001 therapy.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the maximal tolerated biologic dose intensification of radiotherapy using fractional dose escalation with temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme after biopsy or resection and with adequate performance status, bone marrow, and organ function were eligible. The patients underwent postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. All patients received a total dose of 60 Gy to the surgical cavity and residual tumor, with a 5-mm margin. IMRT biologic dose intensification was achieved by escalating from 3 Gy/fraction (Level 1) to 6 Gy/fraction (Levelmore » 4) in 1-Gy increments. Concurrent TMZ was given at 75 mg/m{sup 2}/d for 28 consecutive days. Adjuvant TMZ was given at 150-200 mg/m{sup 2}/d for 5 days every 28 days. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3, Grade 3-4 nonhematologic toxicity, excluding Grade 3 fatigue, nausea, and vomiting. A standard 3+3 Phase I design was used. Results: A total of 16 patients were accrued (12 men and 4 women, median age, 69 years; range, 34-84. The median Karnofsky performance status was 80 (range, 60-90). Of the 16 patients, 3 each were treated at Levels 1 and 2, 4 at Level 3, and 6 at Level 4. All patients received IMRT and concurrent TMZ according to the protocol, except for 1 patient, who received 14 days of concurrent TMZ. The median number of adjuvant TMZ cycles was 7.5 (range, 0-12). The median survival was 16.2 months (range, 3-33). One patient experienced vision loss in the left eye 7 months after IMRT. Four patients underwent repeat surgery for suspected tumor recurrence 6-12 months after IMRT; 3 had radionecrosis. Conclusions: The maximal tolerated IMRT fraction size was not reached in our study. Our results have shown that 60 Gy IMRT delivered in 6-Gy fractions within 2 weeks with concurrent and adjuvant TMZ is tolerable in selected patients with a T{sub 1}-weighted enhancing tumor <6 cm.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of tipifarnib in combination with conventional radiotherapy for patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. The MTD was evaluated in three patient cohorts, stratified based on concurrent use of enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAED) or concurrent treatment with temozolomide (TMZ): Group A: patients not receiving EIAED and not receiving TMZ; Group A-TMZ: patients not receiving EIAED and receiving treatment with TMZ; Group B: any patients receiving EIAED but not TMZ. Patients and Methods: After diagnostic surgery or biopsy, treatment with tipifarnib started 5 to 9 days before initiating radiotherapy, twice daily, in 4-week cycles usingmore » discontinuous dosing (21 out of 28 days), until toxicity or progression. For Group A-TMZ, patients also received TMZ daily during radiotherapy and then standard 5/28 days dosing after radiotherapy. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was determined over the first 10 weeks of therapy for all cohorts. Results: Fifty-one patients were enrolled for MTD determination: 10 patients in Group A, 21 patients in Group A-TMZ, and 20 patients in Group B. In the Group A and Group A-TMZ cohorts, patients achieved the intended MTD of 300 mg twice daily (bid) with DLTs including rash and fatigue. For Group B, the MTD was determined as 300 mg bid, half the expected dose. The DLTs included rash and one intracranial hemorrhage. Thirteen of the 20 patients evaluated in Group A-TMZ were alive at 1 year. Conclusion: Tipifarnib is well tolerated at 300 mg bid given discontinuously (21/28 days) in 4-week cycles, concurrently with standard chemo/radiotherapy. A Phase II study should evaluate the efficacy of tipifarnib with radiation and TMZ in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma and not receiving EIAED.« less