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Title: Molecular signatures associated with clinical outcome in patients with high-risk head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma treated by surgery and radiation

Abstract

Purpose: The local-regional control rate for advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains poor and is unpredictable for a given individual. This study examined whether gene expression patterns developed from tumors from surgicopathologic, criteria-defined, high-risk HNSCC patients could be correlated with clinical outcomes, namely, metastasis or nonrecurrent disease. Methods and Materials: Fifteen primary tumors from patients treated with a consistent protocol of surgery followed by radiotherapy were examined. Seven of these tumors were from high-risk patients who developed distant metastasis (DM), and eight tumors were from patients with no recurrence (NR) (median follow-up, 59 months). Results: Unsupervised clustering of gene expression did not separate the two groups from one another, but when supervised methodologies were applied, 205 genes discriminated the two groups. Within the DM group, genes associated with cell growth and proliferation; DNA replication, recombination, and repair; antiapoptotic pathways; cell adhesion; and angiogenesis were identified. For NR samples, discriminatory genes were associated with the onset of apoptosis. Conclusions: Our data suggest that gene expression analysis of surgically excised HNSCC tumors from patients considered at high risk for recurrence has the potential to identify individuals susceptible to metastasis on the basis of distinct gene-expression patterns. These patients would be idealmore » candidates for testing systemic therapy.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
  2. Department of Biostatistics and Applied Mathematics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
  3. Department of Pathology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
  4. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
  5. Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States). E-mail: michael.story@utsouthwestern.edu
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20793330
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 64; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2005.08.032; PII: S0360-3016(05)02577-0; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; APOPTOSIS; CARCINOMAS; DNA REPLICATION; GENES; HAZARDS; HEAD; METASTASES; NECK; PATIENTS; RADIOTHERAPY; SURGERY

Citation Formats

Giri, Uma, Ashorn, Cheryl L., Ramdas, Latha, Stivers, David N., Coombes, Kevin, El-Naggar, Adel K., Ang, K. Kian, and Story, Michael D. Molecular signatures associated with clinical outcome in patients with high-risk head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma treated by surgery and radiation. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
Giri, Uma, Ashorn, Cheryl L., Ramdas, Latha, Stivers, David N., Coombes, Kevin, El-Naggar, Adel K., Ang, K. Kian, & Story, Michael D. Molecular signatures associated with clinical outcome in patients with high-risk head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma treated by surgery and radiation. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
Giri, Uma, Ashorn, Cheryl L., Ramdas, Latha, Stivers, David N., Coombes, Kevin, El-Naggar, Adel K., Ang, K. Kian, and Story, Michael D. Wed . "Molecular signatures associated with clinical outcome in patients with high-risk head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma treated by surgery and radiation". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
@article{osti_20793330,
title = {Molecular signatures associated with clinical outcome in patients with high-risk head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma treated by surgery and radiation},
author = {Giri, Uma and Ashorn, Cheryl L. and Ramdas, Latha and Stivers, David N. and Coombes, Kevin and El-Naggar, Adel K. and Ang, K. Kian and Story, Michael D.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The local-regional control rate for advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains poor and is unpredictable for a given individual. This study examined whether gene expression patterns developed from tumors from surgicopathologic, criteria-defined, high-risk HNSCC patients could be correlated with clinical outcomes, namely, metastasis or nonrecurrent disease. Methods and Materials: Fifteen primary tumors from patients treated with a consistent protocol of surgery followed by radiotherapy were examined. Seven of these tumors were from high-risk patients who developed distant metastasis (DM), and eight tumors were from patients with no recurrence (NR) (median follow-up, 59 months). Results: Unsupervised clustering of gene expression did not separate the two groups from one another, but when supervised methodologies were applied, 205 genes discriminated the two groups. Within the DM group, genes associated with cell growth and proliferation; DNA replication, recombination, and repair; antiapoptotic pathways; cell adhesion; and angiogenesis were identified. For NR samples, discriminatory genes were associated with the onset of apoptosis. Conclusions: Our data suggest that gene expression analysis of surgically excised HNSCC tumors from patients considered at high risk for recurrence has the potential to identify individuals susceptible to metastasis on the basis of distinct gene-expression patterns. These patients would be ideal candidates for testing systemic therapy.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 3,
volume = 64,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Background: To examine whether nuclear NF-κB expression correlates with outcome in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with primary chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2010, 101 patients with locally advanced primary HNSCC were treated with definitive simultaneous CRT. Pretreatment biopsy specimens were analyzed for NF-κB p65 (RelA) nuclear immunoreactivity. A sample was assigned to be positive with more than 5% positive nuclear expression. The predictive relevance of NF-κB and clinicopathologic factors for overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), local progression-free survival (LPFS), and metastasis-free survival (DMFS) was examined by univariate and multivariatemore » analysis. Results: No significant differences between the groups were observed with regard to age, sex, total radiation dose, fractionation mode, total chemotherapy applied, T stage or grading. Patients with p65 nuclear positive biopsy specimens showed significantly a higher rate of lymph node metastasis (cN2c or cN3 status, P=.034). Within a mean follow-up time of 25 months (range, 2.33-62.96 months) OS, PFS, and DMFS were significantly poorer in the p65 nuclear positive group (P=.008, P=.027, and P=.008, respectively). These correlations remained significant in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: NF-κB/p65 nuclear expression is associated with increased lymphatic and hematogenous tumor dissemination and decreased survival in HNSCC patients treated with primary CRT. Our results may foster further investigation of a predictive relevance of NF-κB/p65 and its role as a suitable target for a molecular-based targeted therapy in HNSCC cancer.« less
  • Purpose: To validate the recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) classification system for squamous cell head and neck cancer as recently reported by the VU University Medical Center. Methods and Materials: In eight Dutch head and neck cancer centers, data necessary to classify patients according to the RPA system were retrospectively collected from the charts of a group of 780 patients treated between 1989 and 2003. The patients in this validation group were classified according to the RPA classification system. For each endpoint, the 5-year values and hazard ratios were calculated and compared with the results of the VU University Medical Center.more » The RPA classification system was considered valid if the hazard ratio of the validation population was within the 95% confidence interval of the VU University Medical Center study population. Results: The locoregional control rate was 82%, 75%, and 63% at 5 years for those with class I, II, and III, respectively (p < 0.0001). The hazard ratio for the locoregional control rate relative to class I was 1.44 (95% confidence interval, 0.97-2.16) for class II and 2.37 (95% confidence interval, 1.57-3.57) for class III. Similar results were found for the distant metastasis, overall survival, and disease-free survival rates. Conclusion: The RPA classification system for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in the postoperative setting, which was originally designed at one center, proved to be valid in a multicenter setting among patients included in a national multicenter study. This validated RPA classification scheme can be used to assess standard treatment strategies for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in the postoperative setting, as well as in the design of future prospective studies.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the impact of a set of patient, tumor, and treatment factors on toxicity and outcome in patients with head-and-neck squamous cell cancer treated with surgical resection and perioperative high-dose rate brachytherapy (PHDRB) alone (single-modality [SM] group) (n = 46) or PHDRB combined with postoperative radiation or chemoradiation (combined-modality [CM] group) (n = 57). Methods and Materials: From 2000 to 2008, 103 patients received PHDRB after complete macroscopic resection. SM patients received 32 or 40 Gy of PHDRB in 8 or 10 twice-daily treatments for R0 and R1 resections. CM patients received 16 or 24 Gy of PHDRBmore » in 4 or 6 twice-daily treatments for R0 and R1 resections, followed by external radiation of 45 Gy in 25 fractions with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Results: Grade {>=}4 complications according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group were more frequent in the SM group than in the CM group (p = 0.024). Grade {>=}3 and {>=}4 complications increased with the antecedent of prior irradiation (p = 0.032 and p = 0.006, respectively) and with TV{sub 150} values of 13 mL or greater (p = 0.032 and p = 0.032, respectively). After a median follow-up of 34.8 and 60.8 months for SM and CM patients, respectively, patients with high-risk margins had a 9-year local control rate of 68.0% whereas patients with wider margins had a 9-year local control of 93.7% (p = 0.045). Patients with primary and recurrent tumors had 9-year actuarial locoregional control rates of 81.8% and 54.2%, respectively (p = 0.003). Patients with lymph-vascular space invasion (LVSI)-positive and LVSI-negative tumors had 9-year distant control rates of 62.8% and 81.6%, respectively (p = 0.034). Disease-free survival rates decreased in recurrent cases (p = 0.006) as well as in LVSI-positive patients (p = 0.035). Conclusions: The complications observed are largely attributable to the antecedent of prior irradiation but can possibly be minimized by meticulous mapping and exhaustive planning to reduce TV{sub 150} values. Patients with high-risk margins, LVSI-positive status, and recurrent disease have a higher risk of treatment failure, and therefore risk-directed treatment strategies are required.« less
  • Purpose: This paper reports long-term results of RTOG 9903, to determine whether the addition of erythropoietin (EPO) would improve the outcomes of radiation therapy (RT) in mildly to moderately anemic patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCCa). Methods and Materials: The trial included HNSCCa patients treated with definitive RT. Patients with stage III or IV disease received concomitant chemoradiation therapy or accelerated fractionation. Pretreatment hemoglobin levels were required to be between 9.0 and 13.5 g/dL (12.5 g/dL for females). EPO, 40,000 U, was administered weekly starting 7 to 10 days before RT was initiated in the RT + EPO arm. Results: A total ofmore » 141 of 148 enrolled patients were evaluable. The baseline median hemoglobin level was 12.1 g/dL. In the RT + EPO arm, the mean hemoglobin level at 4 weeks increased by 1.66 g/dL, whereas it decreased by 0.24 g/dL in the RT arm. With a median follow-up of 7.95 years (range: 1.66-10.08 years) for surviving patients and 3.33 years for all patients (range: 0.03-10.08 years), the 5-year estimate of local-regional failure was 46.2% versus 39.4% (P=.42), local-regional progression-free survival was 31.5% versus 37.6% (P=.20), and overall survival was 36.9% versus 38.2% (P=.54) for the RT + EPO and RT arms, respectively. Late toxicity was not different between the 2 arms. Conclusions: This long-term analysis confirmed that despite the ability of EPO to raise hemoglobin levels in anemic patients with HNSCCa, it did not improve outcomes when added to RT. The possibility of a detrimental effect of EPO could not be ruled out.« less
  • Purpose: Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) can provide information regarding tumor perfusion and permeability and has shown prognostic value in certain tumors types. The goal of this study was to assess the prognostic value of pretreatment DCE-MRI in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients with nodal disease undergoing chemoradiation therapy or surgery. Methods and Materials: Seventy-four patients with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma and neck nodal metastases were eligible for the study. Pretreatment DCE-MRI was performed on a 1.5T MRI. Clinical follow-up was a minimum of 12 months. DCE-MRI data were analyzed using the Tofts model. DCE-MRI parameters weremore » related to treatment outcome (progression-free survival [PFS] and overall survival [OS]). Patients were grouped as no evidence of disease (NED), alive with disease (AWD), dead with disease (DOD), or dead of other causes (DOC). Prognostic significance was assessed using the log-rank test for single variables and Cox proportional hazards regression for combinations of variables. Results: At last clinical follow-up, for Stage III, all 12 patients were NED. For Stage IV, 43 patients were NED, 4 were AWD, 11 were DOD, and 4 were DOC. K{sup trans} is volume transfer constant. In a stepwise Cox regression, skewness of K{sup trans} (volume transfer constant) was the strongest predictor for Stage IV patients (PFS and OS: p <0.001). Conclusion: Our study shows that skewness of K{sup trans} was the strongest predictor of PFS and OS in Stage IV HNSCC patients with nodal disease. This study suggests an important role for pretreatment DCE-MRI parameter K{sup trans} as a predictor of outcome in these patients.« less