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Title: Clinical outcome of hypofractionated conventional conformation radiotherapy for patients with single and no more than three metastatic brain tumors, with noninvasive fixation of the skull without whole brain irradiation

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of hypofractionated conventional conformation radiotherapy (HCCRT) with noninvasive fixation of the skull on patients with single or several brain metastases. Methods and Materials: The subjects were 44 patients who had three or fewer brain metastases (26 solitary, 18 multiple). Treatment was conducted on 65 metastases by rotational conformal beam or multiple fixed coplanar beams with a standard linear accelerator. The planning target volume consisted of the tumor and a 1-cm safety margin. The median isocentric dose was 24 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy) in 3-5 fractions. Whole-brain irradiation was not applied as an initial treatment. Results: Actuarial local tumor control rates at 6 months and 1 year were 78.4% and 71.9%, respectively. In-field recurrence was noted in 10 of 65 tumors, and repeat HCCRT was applied in 5 tumors. Actuarial overall survival rates at 1 year, 2 years, and the median survival time were 50.8%, 24.1%, and 5.8 months, respectively. The patients with an active primary cancer and poor performance status had a poorer prognosis than those without those factors. Actuarial freedom from second brain metastases rates at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years were 86.6%, 69.0%, and 40.9%, respectively. Second brain metastasesmore » were observed in 9 of 44 patients. Lung adenocarcinomas had a higher risk of second brain metastasis than others. Treatment-related severe early or late complications were not observed in this series. Conclusions: Hypofractionated conventional conformation radiotherapy achieved sufficient tumor control and survival. The results suggest that HCCRT would be one of the alternatives for patients with either solitary or several brain metastases.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Department of Radiology, Hirosaki University School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Aomori (Japan). E-mail: maoki-rad@umin.ac.jp
  2. Department of Radiology, Hirosaki University School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Aomori (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20793299
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 64; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2005.03.017; PII: S0360-3016(05)00432-3; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BRAIN; CARCINOMAS; IRRADIATION; LUNGS; METASTASES; PATIENTS; PERFORMANCE; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SAFETY MARGINS; SKULL; SURGERY; SURVIVAL TIME; TOXICITY

Citation Formats

Aoki, Masahiko, Abe, Yoshinao, Hatayama, Yoshiomi, Kondo, Hidehiro, and Basaki, Kiyoshi. Clinical outcome of hypofractionated conventional conformation radiotherapy for patients with single and no more than three metastatic brain tumors, with noninvasive fixation of the skull without whole brain irradiation. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
Aoki, Masahiko, Abe, Yoshinao, Hatayama, Yoshiomi, Kondo, Hidehiro, & Basaki, Kiyoshi. Clinical outcome of hypofractionated conventional conformation radiotherapy for patients with single and no more than three metastatic brain tumors, with noninvasive fixation of the skull without whole brain irradiation. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
Aoki, Masahiko, Abe, Yoshinao, Hatayama, Yoshiomi, Kondo, Hidehiro, and Basaki, Kiyoshi. Wed . "Clinical outcome of hypofractionated conventional conformation radiotherapy for patients with single and no more than three metastatic brain tumors, with noninvasive fixation of the skull without whole brain irradiation". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
@article{osti_20793299,
title = {Clinical outcome of hypofractionated conventional conformation radiotherapy for patients with single and no more than three metastatic brain tumors, with noninvasive fixation of the skull without whole brain irradiation},
author = {Aoki, Masahiko and Abe, Yoshinao and Hatayama, Yoshiomi and Kondo, Hidehiro and Basaki, Kiyoshi},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of hypofractionated conventional conformation radiotherapy (HCCRT) with noninvasive fixation of the skull on patients with single or several brain metastases. Methods and Materials: The subjects were 44 patients who had three or fewer brain metastases (26 solitary, 18 multiple). Treatment was conducted on 65 metastases by rotational conformal beam or multiple fixed coplanar beams with a standard linear accelerator. The planning target volume consisted of the tumor and a 1-cm safety margin. The median isocentric dose was 24 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy) in 3-5 fractions. Whole-brain irradiation was not applied as an initial treatment. Results: Actuarial local tumor control rates at 6 months and 1 year were 78.4% and 71.9%, respectively. In-field recurrence was noted in 10 of 65 tumors, and repeat HCCRT was applied in 5 tumors. Actuarial overall survival rates at 1 year, 2 years, and the median survival time were 50.8%, 24.1%, and 5.8 months, respectively. The patients with an active primary cancer and poor performance status had a poorer prognosis than those without those factors. Actuarial freedom from second brain metastases rates at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years were 86.6%, 69.0%, and 40.9%, respectively. Second brain metastases were observed in 9 of 44 patients. Lung adenocarcinomas had a higher risk of second brain metastasis than others. Treatment-related severe early or late complications were not observed in this series. Conclusions: Hypofractionated conventional conformation radiotherapy achieved sufficient tumor control and survival. The results suggest that HCCRT would be one of the alternatives for patients with either solitary or several brain metastases.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 64,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of staged stereotactic radiotherapy with a 2-week interfraction interval for unresectable brain metastases more than 10 cm{sup 3} in volume. Patients and Methods: Subjects included 43 patients (24 men and 19 women), ranging in age from 41 to 84 years, who had large brain metastases (> 10 cc in volume). Primary tumors were in the colon in 14 patients, lung in 12, breast in 11, and other in 6. The peripheral dose was 10 Gy in three fractions. The interval between fractions was 2 weeks. The mean tumor volume before treatment was 17.6more » {+-} 6.3 cm{sup 3} (mean {+-} SD). Mean follow-up interval was 7.8 months. The local tumor control rate, as well as overall, neurological, and qualitative survivals, were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: At the time of the second and third fractions, mean tumor volumes were 14.3 {+-} 6.5 (18.8% reduction) and 10.6 {+-} 6.1 cm{sup 3} (39.8% reduction), respectively, showing significant reductions. The median overall survival period was 8.8 months. Neurological and qualitative survivals at 12 months were 81.8% and 76.2%, respectively. Local tumor control rates were 89.8% and 75.9% at 6 and 12 months, respectively. Tumor recurrence-free and symptomatic edema-free rates at 12 months were 80.7% and 84.4%, respectively. Conclusions: The 2-week interval allowed significant reduction of the treatment volume. Our results suggest staged stereotactic radiotherapy using our protocol to be a possible alternative for treating large brain metastases.« less
  • Purpose: Data comparing the clinical outcomes of local brain radiotherapy (LBRT) and whole brain RT (WBRT) in patients with a single brain metastasis after tumor removal are limited. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed to compare the patterns of treatment failure, cause of death, progression-free survival, median survival time, and Karnofsky performance status for long-term survivors among patients who underwent surgery followed by either LBRT or WBRT between 1990 and 2008 at the National Cancer Center Hospital. Results: A total of 130 consecutive patients were identified. The median progression-free survival period among the patients who received postoperative LBRTmore » (n = 64) and WBRT (n = 66) was 9.7 and 11.5 months, respectively (p = .75). The local recurrence rates (LBRT, 9.4% vs. WBRT, 12.1%) and intracranial new metastasis rate (LBRT, 42.2% vs. WBRT, 33.3%) were similar in each arm. The incidence of leptomeningeal metastasis was also equivalent (LBRT, 9.4% vs. WBRT, 10.6%). The median survival time for the LBRT and WBRT patients was 13.9 and 16.7 months, respectively (p = .88). A neurologic cause of death was noted in 35.6% of the patients in the LBRT group and 36.7% of the WBRT group (p = .99). The Karnofsky performance status at 2 years was comparable between the two groups. Conclusions: The clinical outcomes of LBRT and WBRT were similar. A prospective evaluation is warranted.« less
  • Purpose: To compare the sparing potential of cerebral hemispheres with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for whole-ventricular irradiation (WVI) and conventional whole-brain irradiation (WBI) in the management of localized central nervous system germ cell tumors (CNSGCTs). Methods and Materials: Ten cases of patients with localized CNSGCTs and submitted to WVI by use of IMRT with or without a 'boost' to the primary lesion were selected. For comparison purposes, similar treatment plans were produced by use of 3D-CRT (WVI with or without boost) and WBI (opposed lateral fields with or without boost), and cerebral hemisphere sparing was evaluatedmore » at dose levels ranging from 2 Gy to 40 Gy. Results: The median prescription dose for WVI was 30.6 Gy (range, 25.2-37.5 Gy), and that for the boost was 16.5 Gy (range, 0-23.4 Gy). Mean irradiated cerebral hemisphere volumes were lower for WVI with IMRT than for 3D-CRT and were lower for WVI with 3D-CRT than for WBI. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was associated with the lowest irradiated volumes, with reductions of 7.5%, 12.2%, and 9.0% at dose levels of 20, 30, and 40 Gy, respectively, compared with 3D-CRT. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy provided statistically significant reductions of median irradiated volumes at all dose levels (p = 0.002 or less). However, estimated radiation doses to peripheral areas of the body were 1.9 times higher with IMRT than with 3D-CRT. Conclusions: Although IMRT is associated with increased radiation doses to peripheral areas of the body, its use can spare a significant amount of normal central nervous system tissue compared with 3D-CRT or WBI in the setting of CNSGCT treatment.« less
  • Purpose: The aim was to evaluate treatment of cerebral metastases with hypofractionated conformal stereotactic radiotherapy (HCSRT) or whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) in combination with a stereotactic boost. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients were treated with HCSRT and 14 patients with WBRT in combination with a stereotactic boost. Radiation doses were 40 Gy (5 fractions) in HCSRT or 30 Gy (WBRT) combined with a mean dose of 17 Gy stereotactically (1-3 fractions). Results: The median survival time in the HCSRT as well as the WBRT group was 5.0 months, and 87% died of extracranial disease. Radiologic follow-up (mean, 3.7 months after treatment)more » showed local control in the HCSRT group in 84% and in the WBRT group in 100%. Patients treated with HCSRT developed new brain metastases distant from the irradiated area in 25%. Two patients treated with HCSRT deteriorated neurologically during treatment, and in 2 patients radionecrosis developed. Conclusions: Although there may be a higher risk of distant new metastases, HCSRT as a treatment for brain metastases seems to be as effective as WBRT in combination with a stereotactic boost. Complications are in the range of what has been reported previously.« less
  • Purpose: To assess local control and acute and chronic toxicity with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as adjuvant treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2002 and February 2006, 68 patients at high risk of cervical cancer after hysterectomy were treated with adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}) for six cycles every week. Thirty-three patients received adjuvant radiotherapy by IMRT. Before the IMRT series was initiated, 35 other patients underwent conventional four-field radiotherapy (Box-RT). The two groups did not differ significantly in respect of clinicopathologic and treatment factors. Results: IMRT providedmore » compatible local tumor control compared with Box-RT. The actuarial 1-year locoregional control for patients in the IMRT and Box-RT groups was 93% and 94%, respectively. IMRT was well tolerated, with significant reduction in acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities compared with the Box-RT group (GI 36 vs. 80%, p = 0.00012; GU 30 vs. 60%, p = 0.022). Furthermore, the IMRT group had lower rates of chronic GI and GU toxicities than the Box-RT patients (GI 6 vs. 34%, p = 0.002; GU 9 vs. 23%, p = 0.231). Conclusion: Our results suggest that IMRT significantly improved the tolerance to adjuvant chemoradiotherapy with compatible locoregional control compared with conventional Box-RT. However, longer follow-up and more patients are needed to confirm the benefits of IMRT.« less