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Title: Outcomes of visual acuity in carbon ion radiotherapy: Analysis of dose-volume histograms and prognostic factors

Abstract

Purpose: To analyze the tolerance dose for retention of visual acuity in patients with head-and-neck tumors treated with carbon ion radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From June 1994 to March 2000, 163 patients with tumors in the head and neck or skull base region were treated with carbon ion radiotherapy. Analysis was performed on 54 optic nerves (ONs) corresponding to 30 patients whose ONs had been included in the irradiated volume. These patients showed no evidence of visual impairment due to other factors and had a follow-up period of >4 years. All patients had been informed of the possibility of visual impairment before treatment. We evaluated the dose-complication probability and the prognostic factors for the retention of visual acuity in carbon ion radiotherapy, using dose-volume histograms and multivariate analysis. Results: The median age of 30 patients (14 men, 16 women) was 57.2 years. Median prescribed total dose was 56.0 gray equivalents (GyE) at 3.0-4.0 GyE per fraction per day (range, 48-64 GyE; 16-18 fractions; 4-6 weeks). Of 54 ONs that were analyzed, 35 had been irradiated with <57 GyE (maximum dose [D{sub max}]) resulting in no visual loss. Conversely, 11 of the 19 ONs (58%) irradiated with >57 GyE (D{sub max})more » suffered a decrease of visual acuity. In all of these cases, the ONs had been involved in the tumor before carbon ion radiotherapy. In the multivariate analysis, a dose of 20% of the volume of the ON (D{sub 2}) was significantly associated with visual loss. Conclusions: The occurrence of visual loss seems to be correlated with a delivery of >60 GyE to 20% of the volume of the ON.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [2]
  1. Hospital, Charged Particle Research Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). E-mail: azusa@nirs.go.jp
  2. Hospital, Charged Particle Research Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)
  3. Department of Ophthalmology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Chiba (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20793296
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 64; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2005.07.298; PII: S0360-3016(05)01170-3; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CARBON IONS; CARCINOMAS; HEAD; IRRADIATION; MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS; NECK; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; RETENTION; SKULL; TOLERANCE

Citation Formats

Hasegawa, Azusa, Mizoe, Jun-etsu, Mizota, Atsushi, and Tsujii, Hirohiko. Outcomes of visual acuity in carbon ion radiotherapy: Analysis of dose-volume histograms and prognostic factors. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
Hasegawa, Azusa, Mizoe, Jun-etsu, Mizota, Atsushi, & Tsujii, Hirohiko. Outcomes of visual acuity in carbon ion radiotherapy: Analysis of dose-volume histograms and prognostic factors. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
Hasegawa, Azusa, Mizoe, Jun-etsu, Mizota, Atsushi, and Tsujii, Hirohiko. Wed . "Outcomes of visual acuity in carbon ion radiotherapy: Analysis of dose-volume histograms and prognostic factors". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
@article{osti_20793296,
title = {Outcomes of visual acuity in carbon ion radiotherapy: Analysis of dose-volume histograms and prognostic factors},
author = {Hasegawa, Azusa and Mizoe, Jun-etsu and Mizota, Atsushi and Tsujii, Hirohiko},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To analyze the tolerance dose for retention of visual acuity in patients with head-and-neck tumors treated with carbon ion radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From June 1994 to March 2000, 163 patients with tumors in the head and neck or skull base region were treated with carbon ion radiotherapy. Analysis was performed on 54 optic nerves (ONs) corresponding to 30 patients whose ONs had been included in the irradiated volume. These patients showed no evidence of visual impairment due to other factors and had a follow-up period of >4 years. All patients had been informed of the possibility of visual impairment before treatment. We evaluated the dose-complication probability and the prognostic factors for the retention of visual acuity in carbon ion radiotherapy, using dose-volume histograms and multivariate analysis. Results: The median age of 30 patients (14 men, 16 women) was 57.2 years. Median prescribed total dose was 56.0 gray equivalents (GyE) at 3.0-4.0 GyE per fraction per day (range, 48-64 GyE; 16-18 fractions; 4-6 weeks). Of 54 ONs that were analyzed, 35 had been irradiated with <57 GyE (maximum dose [D{sub max}]) resulting in no visual loss. Conversely, 11 of the 19 ONs (58%) irradiated with >57 GyE (D{sub max}) suffered a decrease of visual acuity. In all of these cases, the ONs had been involved in the tumor before carbon ion radiotherapy. In the multivariate analysis, a dose of 20% of the volume of the ON (D{sub 2}) was significantly associated with visual loss. Conclusions: The occurrence of visual loss seems to be correlated with a delivery of >60 GyE to 20% of the volume of the ON.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 64,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Purpose: To determine the risk factors for neovascular glaucoma (NVG) after carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) of choroidal melanoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 55 patients with choroidal melanoma were treated between 2001 and 2005 with C-ion RT based on computed tomography treatment planning. All patients had a tumor of large size or one located close to the optic disk. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the risk factors of NVG for the following parameters; gender, age, dose-volumes of the iris-ciliary body and the wall of eyeball, and irradiation of the optic disk (ODI). Results: Neovascular glaucomamore » occurred in 23 patients and the 3-year cumulative NVG rate was 42.6 {+-} 6.8% (standard error), but enucleation from NVG was performed in only three eyes. Multivariate analysis revealed that the significant risk factors for NVG were V50{sub IC} (volume irradiated {>=}50 GyE to iris-ciliary body) (p = 0.002) and ODI (p = 0.036). The 3-year NVG rate for patients with V50{sub IC} {>=}0.127 mL and those with V50{sub IC} <0.127 mL were 71.4 {+-} 8.5% and 11.5 {+-} 6.3%, respectively. The corresponding rate for the patients with and without ODI were 62.9 {+-} 10.4% and 28.4 {+-} 8.0%, respectively. Conclusion: Dose-volume histogram analysis with computed tomography indicated that V50{sub IC} and ODI were independent risk factors for NVG. An irradiation system that can reduce the dose to both the anterior segment and the optic disk might be worth adopting to investigate whether or not incidence of NVG can be decreased with it.« less
  • Purpose: To identify prognostic factors and evaluate biochemical control rates for patients with localized prostate cancer treated with either high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or conventional-dose three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy 3D-CRT. Methods: Four hundred sixteen patients with a minimum follow-up of 3 years (median, 5 years) were included. Two hundred seventy-one patients received 3D-CRT with a median dose of 68.4 Gy (range, 66-71 Gy). The next 145 patients received IMRT with a median dose of 75.6 Gy (range, 70.2-77.4 Gy). Biochemical control rates were calculated according to both American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) consensus definitions. Prognostic factors were identifiedmore » using both univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The 5-year biochemical control rate was 60.4% for 3D-CRT and 74.1% for IMRT (p < 0.0001, first ASTRO Consensus definition). Using the ASTRO Phoenix definition, the 5-year biochemical control rate was 74.4% and 84.6% with 3D-RT and IMRT, respectively (p = 0.0326). Univariate analyses determined that PSA level, T stage, Gleason score, perineural invasion, and radiation dose were predictive of biochemical control. On multivariate analysis, dose, Gleason score, and perineural invasion remained significant. Conclusion: On the basis of both ASTRO definitions, dose, Gleason score, and perineural invasion were predictive of biochemical control. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy allowed delivery of higher doses of radiation with very low toxicity, resulting in improved biochemical control.« less
  • Purpose: To perform an in-depth temporal analysis of visual acuity (VA) outcomes after proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) in a large, uniformly treated cohort of uveal melanoma (UM) patients, to determine trends in VA evolution depending on pretreatment and temporally defined posttreatment VA measurements; and to investigate the relevance of specific patient, tumor and dose-volume parameters to posttreatment vision loss. Methods and Materials: Uveal melanoma patients receiving PBRT were identified from a prospectively maintained database. Included patients (n=645) received 56 GyE in 4 fractions, had pretreatment best corrected VA (BCVA) in the affected eye of count fingers (CF) or better, withmore » posttreatment VA assessment at specified post-PBRT time point(s). Patients were grouped according to the pretreatment BCVA into favorable (≥20/40) or unfavorable (20/50-20/400) and poor (CF) strata. Temporal analysis of BCVA changes was described, and univariate and forward stepwise multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify predictors for VA loss. Results: Median VA follow-up was 53 months (range, 3-213 months). At 60-month follow up, among evaluable treated eyes with favorable pretreatment BCVA, 45% retained BCVA ≥20/40, whereas among evaluable treated eyes with initially unfavorable/poor BCVA, 21% had vision ≥20/100. Among those with a favorable initial BCVA, attaining BCVA of ≥20/40 at any posttreatment time point was associated with subsequent maintenance of excellent BCVA. Multivariate analysis identified volume of the macula receiving 28GyE (P<.0001) and optic nerve (P=.0004) as independent dose-volume histogram predictors of 48-month post-PBRT vision loss among initially favorable treated eyes. Conclusions: Approximately half of PBRT-treated UM eyes with excellent pretreatment BCVA assessed at 5 years after treatment will retain excellent long-term vision. 28GyE macula and optic nerve dose-volume histogram parameters allow for rational treatment planning optimization that may lead to improved visual outcomes. The detailed temporal analysis with intermediate as well as long-term functional prognosis, and the relationship of outcomes with clinical and treatment planning parameters, is critical for informed care of UM patients before and after PBRT.« less
  • Purpose: The probability of a specific radiotherapy outcome is typically a complex, unknown function of dosimetric and clinical factors. Current models are usually oversimplified. We describe alternative methods for building multivariable dose-response models. Methods: Representative data sets of esophagitis and xerostomia are used. We use a logistic regression framework to approximate the treatment-response function. Bootstrap replications are performed to explore variable selection stability. To guard against under/overfitting, we compare several analytical and data-driven methods for model-order estimation. Spearman's coefficient is used to evaluate performance robustness. Novel graphical displays of variable cross correlations and bootstrap selection are demonstrated. Results: Bootstrap variablemore » selection techniques improve model building by reducing sample size effects and unveiling variable cross correlations. Inference by resampling and Bayesian approaches produced generally consistent guidance for model order estimation. The optimal esophagitis model consisted of 5 dosimetric/clinical variables. Although the xerostomia model could be improved by combining clinical and dose-volume factors, the improvement would be small. Conclusions: Prediction of treatment response can be improved by mixing clinical and dose-volume factors. Graphical tools can mitigate the inherent complexity of multivariable modeling. Bootstrap-based variable selection analysis increases the reliability of reported models. Statistical inference methods combined with Spearman's coefficient provide an efficient approach to estimating optimal model order.« less
  • Purpose: To identify significant prognostic factors after irradiation of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) in 335 breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The potential prognostic factors investigated included involved vertebra, other bone metastases, visceral metastases, performance status, pretreatment ambulatory status, time until motor deficits developed before RT, radiation schedule (shorter-course RT [one fraction of 8 Gy/five fractions of 4 Gy] vs. longer-course RT [10 fractions of 3 Gy/15 fractions of 2.5 Gy/20 fractions of 2 Gy), and the response to RT. Results: On multivariate analysis, better functional outcome was associated with slower development of motor deficits (p <0.001) and beingmore » ambulatory before RT (p <0.001). The overall recurrence rate of MSCC was greater if other bone metastases were present (p <0.001) and if shorter-course RT was used (p <0.001). In-field recurrences alone were more frequent after shorter-course RT (p = 0.008). Survival was negatively affected by the presence of visceral metastases (p <0.001), deterioration of motor function after RT (p <0.001), reduced performance status (p <0.001), and the rapid development of motor deficits (p = 0.044). Conclusion: Outcomes and survival after RT for MSCC in breast cancer patients are associated with several prognostic factors. Patients with poor expected survival may be treated with shorter-course RT to keep the overall treatment time short. If survival is expected to be relatively favorable, longer-course RT appears preferable, because it is associated with fewer MSCC recurrences.« less