skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma: The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center experience

Abstract

Purpose: To review the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's experience in using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and June 2004, 50 patients with histologically confirmed cancer of the oropharynx underwent IMRT at our institution. There were 40 men and 10 women with a median age of 56 years (range, 28-78 years). The disease was Stage I in 1 patient (2%), Stage II in 3 patients (6%), Stage III in 7 (14%), and Stage IV in 39 (78%). Forty-eight patients (96%) received definitive treatment, and 2 (4%) were treated in the postoperative adjuvant setting. Concurrent chemotherapy was used in 43 patients (86%). Patients were treated using three different IMRT approaches: 76% dose painting, 18% concomitant boost with IMRT in both am and pm deliveries, and 6% concomitant boost with IMRT only in pm delivery. Regardless of the approach, the average prescription dose to the gross tumor planning target volume was 70 Gy, while the average dose delivered to the subclinical volume was 59.4 Gy in the dose painting group and 54 Gy in the concomitant boost group. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding tubes (PEGs) were placed before the beginning of treatment inmore » 84% of the patients. Acute and late toxicity were graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) radiation morbidity scoring criteria. Toxicity was also evaluated using subjective criteria such as the presence of esophageal stricture, and the need for PEG usage. The local progression-free, regional progression-free, and distant metastases-free rates, and overall survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Three patients had persistent locoregional disease after treatment. The 2-year estimates of local progression-free, regional progression-free, distant metastases-free, and overall survival were 98%, 88%, 84%, and 98%, respectively. The worst acute mucositis experienced was Grade 1 in 4 patients (8%), Grade 2 in 27 (54%), and Grade 3 in 19 (38%). Xerostomia decreased with increasing time interval from the end of radiotherapy, and among the patients with at least 9 months of follow-up there was 67% Grade 0-1 and 33% Grade 2 toxicity. Of the 42 patients who required upfront PEG placement, 6 were still using PEG for nutrition at the time of this analysis. Three patients had cervical esophageal strictures, and of these, 1 was still PEG dependent 1 year after treatment. Two of these patients were treated with the IMRT concomitant boost am and pm approach, whereas the other was treated with the dose painting technique. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy achieved encouraging local control rates in patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma. Treatment toxicity was acceptable even in the setting of concurrent chemotherapy. Long-term follow-up is needed to confirm these preliminary findings.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [5];  [5];  [6]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)
  2. Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)
  3. Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)
  4. Department of Medical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)
  5. Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)
  6. Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States). E-mail: leen2@mskcc.org
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20793292
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 64; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2005.03.006; PII: S0360-3016(05)00418-9; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CARCINOMAS; CHEMOTHERAPY; CULTURAL OBJECTS; METASTASES; NUTRITION; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; TOXICITY

Citation Formats

Arruda, Fernando F. de, Puri, Dev R., Zhung, Joanne, Narayana, Ashwatha, Wolden, Suzanne, Hunt, Margie, Stambuk, Hilda, Pfister, David, Kraus, Dennis, Shaha, Ashok, Shah, Jatin, and Lee, Nancy Y. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma: The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center experience. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
Arruda, Fernando F. de, Puri, Dev R., Zhung, Joanne, Narayana, Ashwatha, Wolden, Suzanne, Hunt, Margie, Stambuk, Hilda, Pfister, David, Kraus, Dennis, Shaha, Ashok, Shah, Jatin, & Lee, Nancy Y. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma: The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center experience. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
Arruda, Fernando F. de, Puri, Dev R., Zhung, Joanne, Narayana, Ashwatha, Wolden, Suzanne, Hunt, Margie, Stambuk, Hilda, Pfister, David, Kraus, Dennis, Shaha, Ashok, Shah, Jatin, and Lee, Nancy Y. Wed . "Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma: The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center experience". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
@article{osti_20793292,
title = {Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma: The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center experience},
author = {Arruda, Fernando F. de and Puri, Dev R. and Zhung, Joanne and Narayana, Ashwatha and Wolden, Suzanne and Hunt, Margie and Stambuk, Hilda and Pfister, David and Kraus, Dennis and Shaha, Ashok and Shah, Jatin and Lee, Nancy Y.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To review the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's experience in using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and June 2004, 50 patients with histologically confirmed cancer of the oropharynx underwent IMRT at our institution. There were 40 men and 10 women with a median age of 56 years (range, 28-78 years). The disease was Stage I in 1 patient (2%), Stage II in 3 patients (6%), Stage III in 7 (14%), and Stage IV in 39 (78%). Forty-eight patients (96%) received definitive treatment, and 2 (4%) were treated in the postoperative adjuvant setting. Concurrent chemotherapy was used in 43 patients (86%). Patients were treated using three different IMRT approaches: 76% dose painting, 18% concomitant boost with IMRT in both am and pm deliveries, and 6% concomitant boost with IMRT only in pm delivery. Regardless of the approach, the average prescription dose to the gross tumor planning target volume was 70 Gy, while the average dose delivered to the subclinical volume was 59.4 Gy in the dose painting group and 54 Gy in the concomitant boost group. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding tubes (PEGs) were placed before the beginning of treatment in 84% of the patients. Acute and late toxicity were graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) radiation morbidity scoring criteria. Toxicity was also evaluated using subjective criteria such as the presence of esophageal stricture, and the need for PEG usage. The local progression-free, regional progression-free, and distant metastases-free rates, and overall survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Three patients had persistent locoregional disease after treatment. The 2-year estimates of local progression-free, regional progression-free, distant metastases-free, and overall survival were 98%, 88%, 84%, and 98%, respectively. The worst acute mucositis experienced was Grade 1 in 4 patients (8%), Grade 2 in 27 (54%), and Grade 3 in 19 (38%). Xerostomia decreased with increasing time interval from the end of radiotherapy, and among the patients with at least 9 months of follow-up there was 67% Grade 0-1 and 33% Grade 2 toxicity. Of the 42 patients who required upfront PEG placement, 6 were still using PEG for nutrition at the time of this analysis. Three patients had cervical esophageal strictures, and of these, 1 was still PEG dependent 1 year after treatment. Two of these patients were treated with the IMRT concomitant boost am and pm approach, whereas the other was treated with the dose painting technique. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy achieved encouraging local control rates in patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma. Treatment toxicity was acceptable even in the setting of concurrent chemotherapy. Long-term follow-up is needed to confirm these preliminary findings.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 64,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Purpose: To update the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's experience with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and April 2009, 442 patients with histologically confirmed OPC underwent IMRT at our center. There were 379 men and 63 women with a median age of 57 years (range, 27-91). The disease was Stage I in 2%, Stage II in 4%, Stage III in 21%, and Stage IV in 73% of patients. The primary tumor subsite was tonsil in 50%, base of tongue in 46%, pharyngeal wall in 3%, and soft palate in 2%.more » The median prescription dose to the planning target volume of the gross tumor was 70 Gy for definitive (n = 412) cases and 66 Gy for postoperative cases (n = 30). A total 404 patients (91%) received chemotherapy, including 389 (88%) who received concurrent chemotherapy, the majority of which was platinum-based. Results: Median follow-up among surviving patients was 36.8 months (range, 3-135). The 3-year cumulative incidence of local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis was 5.4%, 5.6%, and 12.5%, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 84.9%. The incidence of late dysphagia and late xerostomia {>=}Grade 2 was 11% and 29%, respectively. Conclusions: Our results confirm the feasibility of IMRT in achieving excellent locoregional control and low rates of xerostomia. According to our knowledge, this study is the largest report of patients treated with IMRT for OPC.« less
  • Purpose: We previously demonstrated that intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) significantly improves radiation dose distribution over three-dimensional planning for nasopharynx cancer and reported positive early clinical results. We now evaluate whether IMRT has resulted in improved outcomes for a larger cohort of patients with longer follow-up. Methods and Materials: Since 1998, all 74 patients with newly diagnosed, nonmetastatic nasopharynx cancer were treated with IMRT using accelerated fractionation to 70 Gy; 59 received a hyperfractionated concomitant boost, and more recently 15 received once-daily treatment with dose painting. With the exception of Stage I disease (n = 5) and patient preference (n =more » 1), 69 patients received concurrent and adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy similar to that in the Intergroup 0099 trial. Results: Patient characteristics: median age 45; 32% Asian; 72% male; 65% World Health Organization III; 6% Stage I, 16% Stage II, 30% Stage III, 47% Stage IV. Median follow-up is 35 months. The 3-year actuarial rate of local control is 91%, and regional control is 93%; freedom from distant metastases, progression-free survival, and overall survival at 3 years are 78%, 67%, and 83%, respectively. There was 100% local control for Stage T1/T2 disease, compared to 83% for T3/T4 disease (p = 0.01). Six patients failed at the primary site, with median time to local tumor progression 16 months; 5 were exclusively within the 70 Gy volume, and 1 was both within and outside the target volume. There is a trend for improved local control with IMRT when compared to local control of 79% for 35 patients treated before 1998 with three-dimensional planning and chemotherapy (p 0.11). Six months posttherapy, 21%, 13%, 15%, and 0% of patients with follow-up audiograms (n = 24 patients) had Grade 1, 2, 3, and 4 sensorineural hearing loss, respectively. For patients with >1 year follow-up (n = 59), rates of long-term xerostomia were as follows: 26% none, 42% Grade 1, 32% Grade 2, and zero Grade 3. Conclusions: The pattern of primary site failure within the target volume suggests locally advanced T stage disease may require a higher biologic dose to gross tumor. Rates of severe (Grade 3-4) ototoxicity and xerostomia are low with IMRT as a result of normal-tissue protection. Distant metastases are now the dominant form of failure, emphasizing the need for improved systemic therapy.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the significance of CD44 protein expression on the treatment outcomes of radiation therapy in patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) with or without p16 protein expression in the tumor tissue. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the medical records of 58 OPSCC patients who had undergone radiation therapy and examined the tumor tissue expressions of CD44 and p16 protein by immunohistochemical staining. The correlations between the expressions of these proteins and the patients' treatment outcomes were analyzed. Results: The data of 58 consecutive OPSCC patients who had undergone definitive intensity modulated radiation therapy were analyzed. The male/femalemore » ratio was 55:3, and the median age was 64 years. The clinical stage of the disease was stage II in 7 patients, stage III in 5 patients, stage IVA in 35 patients, and stage IVB in 11 patients. Of the patients, 79% received additional induction and/or concurrent chemotherapy. The median follow-up duration was 34 months. The 3-year overall survival, progression-free survival (PFS) and locoregional control (LRC) rates of all the patients, regardless of the results of immunohistochemistry, were 73%, 64% and 76%, respectively. The PFS and LRC rates in the CD44{sup −} patients (86% and 93%, respectively) were significantly higher than those in the CD44{sup +} patients (57% and 70%, respectively). The PFS and LRC rates in the p16{sup +} patients (83% and 90%, respectively) were significantly higher than those in the p16{sup −} patients (45% and 61%, respectively). Patients who were CD44{sup −}/p16{sup +} showed the best LRC rates, and those who were CD44{sup +}/p16{sup −} showed the worst PFS and LRC rates among all the groups. Conclusions: Profiling of CD44 and p16 protein expressions by immunohistochemical staining is useful for predicting the treatment outcomes in patients with OPSCC undergoing definitive intensity modulated radiation therapy.« less
  • Purpose: External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plays a controversial role in the management of nonanaplastic thyroid cancer. We reviewed our institution's outcomes in patients treated with EBRT for advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 1989 and April 2006, 76 patients with nonanaplastic thyroid cancer were treated with EBRT. The median follow-up for the surviving patients was 35.3 months (range, 4.2-178.4). The lesions were primarily advanced and included Stage T2 in 5 (7%), T3 in 5 (7%), and T4 in 64 (84%) patients. Stage N1 disease was present in 60 patients (79%). Distant metastases before EBRT weremore » identified in 27 patients (36%). The median total EBRT dose delivered was 6,300 cGy. The histologic features examined included medullary in 12 patients (16%) and nonmedullary in 64 (84%). Of the 76 patients, 71 (93%) had undergone surgery before RT, and radioactive iodine treatment was used in 56 patients (74%). Results: The 2- and 4-year overall locoregional control rate for all histologic types was 86% and 72%, respectively, and the 2- and 4-year overall survival rate for all patients was 74% and 55%, respectively. No significant differences were found in locoregional control, overall survival, or distant metastases-free survival for patients with complete resection, microscopic residual disease, or gross residual disease. Grade 3 acute mucositis and dysphagia occurred in 14 (18%) and 24 (32%) patients, respectively. Late adverse toxicity was notable for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube use in 4 patients (5%). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that EBRT is effective for locoregional control of selected locally advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid malignancies, with acceptable acute toxicity.« less
  • Purpose: To provide a historical and personal narrative of the development of radiation oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), from its founding more than 100 years ago to the present day. Methods and Materials: Historical sources include the Archives of MSKCC, publications by members of MSKCC, the author's personal records and recollections, and her communications with former colleagues, particularly Dr. Basil Hilaris, Dr. Zvi Fuks, and Dr. Beryl McCormick. Conclusions: The author, who spent 38 years at MSKCC, presents the challenges and triumphs of MSKCC's Radiation Oncology Department and details MSKCC's breakthroughs in radiation oncology. She also describes MSKCC'smore » involvement in the founding of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology.« less