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Title: Effect of temperature on hydration kinetics and polymerization of tricalcium silicate in stirred suspensions of CaO-saturated solutions

Abstract

Tricalcium silicate was hydrated at 274, 278, 283, 298, and 313 K in stirred suspensions of saturated CaO solutions under a nitrogen-gas atmosphere until the end of deceleratory period. The suspension conductivities and energy flows were measured continuously. The individual reaction rates for tricalcium silicate dissolution, calcium silicate hydrate precipitation, and calcium hydroxide precipitation were calculated from these measurements. The results suggest that the proportion of tricalcium silicate dissolved was determined by the rate of tricalcium silicate dissolution and the time to very rapid calcium hydroxide precipitation. The time to very rapid calcium hydroxide precipitation was more sensitive to changes in temperature than was the rate of tricalcium silicate dissolution, so that the proportion of tricalcium silicate hydration dissolved by the deceleratory period increased with decreasing temperature. The average chain length of the calcium silicate hydrate ascertained by magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy increased with increasing temperature.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3]
  1. U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, 72 Lyme Road, Hanover, NH 03755-1290 (United States). E-mail: steven.a.grant@usace.army.mil
  2. U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, 72 Lyme Road, Hanover, NH 03755-1290 (United States)
  3. Quaternary Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20793281
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cement and Concrete Research; Journal Volume: 36; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.cemconres.2005.10.001; PII: S0008-8846(05)00231-0; Copyright (c) 2005 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CALCIUM HYDROXIDES; CALCIUM OXIDES; CALCIUM SILICATES; CALORIMETRY; DISSOLUTION; HYDRATES; HYDRATION; NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE; POLYMERIZATION; PRECIPITATION; REACTION KINETICS; SOLUTIONS; SPECTROSCOPY; SUSPENSIONS; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0273-0400 K

Citation Formats

Grant, Steven A., Boitnott, Ginger E., Korhonen, Charles J., and Sletten, Ronald S. Effect of temperature on hydration kinetics and polymerization of tricalcium silicate in stirred suspensions of CaO-saturated solutions. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/J.CEMCONRES.2005.1.
Grant, Steven A., Boitnott, Ginger E., Korhonen, Charles J., & Sletten, Ronald S. Effect of temperature on hydration kinetics and polymerization of tricalcium silicate in stirred suspensions of CaO-saturated solutions. United States. doi:10.1016/J.CEMCONRES.2005.1.
Grant, Steven A., Boitnott, Ginger E., Korhonen, Charles J., and Sletten, Ronald S. Sat . "Effect of temperature on hydration kinetics and polymerization of tricalcium silicate in stirred suspensions of CaO-saturated solutions". United States. doi:10.1016/J.CEMCONRES.2005.1.
@article{osti_20793281,
title = {Effect of temperature on hydration kinetics and polymerization of tricalcium silicate in stirred suspensions of CaO-saturated solutions},
author = {Grant, Steven A. and Boitnott, Ginger E. and Korhonen, Charles J. and Sletten, Ronald S.},
abstractNote = {Tricalcium silicate was hydrated at 274, 278, 283, 298, and 313 K in stirred suspensions of saturated CaO solutions under a nitrogen-gas atmosphere until the end of deceleratory period. The suspension conductivities and energy flows were measured continuously. The individual reaction rates for tricalcium silicate dissolution, calcium silicate hydrate precipitation, and calcium hydroxide precipitation were calculated from these measurements. The results suggest that the proportion of tricalcium silicate dissolved was determined by the rate of tricalcium silicate dissolution and the time to very rapid calcium hydroxide precipitation. The time to very rapid calcium hydroxide precipitation was more sensitive to changes in temperature than was the rate of tricalcium silicate dissolution, so that the proportion of tricalcium silicate hydration dissolved by the deceleratory period increased with decreasing temperature. The average chain length of the calcium silicate hydrate ascertained by magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy increased with increasing temperature.},
doi = {10.1016/J.CEMCONRES.2005.1},
journal = {Cement and Concrete Research},
number = 4,
volume = 36,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
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