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Title: Characterization of a novel autophagy-specific gene, ATG29

Abstract

Autophagy is a process whereby cytoplasmic proteins and organelles are sequestered for bulk degradation in the vacuole/lysosome. At present, 16 ATG genes have been found that are essential for autophagosome formation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Most of these genes are also involved in the cytoplasm to vacuole transport pathway, which shares machinery with autophagy. Most Atg proteins are colocalized at the pre-autophagosomal structure (PAS), from which the autophagosome is thought to originate, but the precise mechanism of autophagy remains poorly understood. During a genetic screen aimed to obtain novel gene(s) required for autophagy, we identified a novel ORF, ATG29/YPL166w. atg29{delta} cells were sensitive to starvation and induction of autophagy was severely retarded. However, the Cvt pathway operated normally. Therefore, ATG29 is an ATG gene specifically required for autophagy. Additionally, an Atg29-GFP fusion protein was observed to localize to the PAS. From these results, we propose that Atg29 functions in autophagosome formation at the PAS in collaboration with other Atg proteins.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [4];  [4];  [4];  [4];  [5]
  1. Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)
  2. (Japan)
  3. Division of Molecular Cell Biology, National Institute for Basic Biology, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan)
  4. Department of Bioscience, Teikyo University of Science and Technology, Yamanashi 409-0193 (Japan)
  5. Division of Molecular Cell Biology, National Institute for Basic Biology, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan) and School of Life Science, Graduate University for Advance Studies, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan). E-mail: yohsumi@nibb.ac.jp
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20793246
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 338; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2005.10.163; PII: S0006-291X(05)02441-1; Copyright (c) 2005 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; AMINO ACIDS; CYTOPLASM; GENES; PROTEINS; SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

Citation Formats

Kawamata, Tomoko, Division of Molecular Cell Biology, National Institute for Basic Biology, Okazaki 444-8585, Kamada, Yoshiaki, School of Life Science, Graduate University for Advance Studies, Okazaki 444-8585, Suzuki, Kuninori, School of Life Science, Graduate University for Advance Studies, Okazaki 444-8585, Kuboshima, Norihiro, Akimatsu, Hiroshi, Ota, Shinichi, Ohsumi, Mariko, and Ohsumi, Yoshinori. Characterization of a novel autophagy-specific gene, ATG29. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2005.1.
Kawamata, Tomoko, Division of Molecular Cell Biology, National Institute for Basic Biology, Okazaki 444-8585, Kamada, Yoshiaki, School of Life Science, Graduate University for Advance Studies, Okazaki 444-8585, Suzuki, Kuninori, School of Life Science, Graduate University for Advance Studies, Okazaki 444-8585, Kuboshima, Norihiro, Akimatsu, Hiroshi, Ota, Shinichi, Ohsumi, Mariko, & Ohsumi, Yoshinori. Characterization of a novel autophagy-specific gene, ATG29. United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2005.1.
Kawamata, Tomoko, Division of Molecular Cell Biology, National Institute for Basic Biology, Okazaki 444-8585, Kamada, Yoshiaki, School of Life Science, Graduate University for Advance Studies, Okazaki 444-8585, Suzuki, Kuninori, School of Life Science, Graduate University for Advance Studies, Okazaki 444-8585, Kuboshima, Norihiro, Akimatsu, Hiroshi, Ota, Shinichi, Ohsumi, Mariko, and Ohsumi, Yoshinori. Fri . "Characterization of a novel autophagy-specific gene, ATG29". United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2005.1.
@article{osti_20793246,
title = {Characterization of a novel autophagy-specific gene, ATG29},
author = {Kawamata, Tomoko and Division of Molecular Cell Biology, National Institute for Basic Biology, Okazaki 444-8585 and Kamada, Yoshiaki and School of Life Science, Graduate University for Advance Studies, Okazaki 444-8585 and Suzuki, Kuninori and School of Life Science, Graduate University for Advance Studies, Okazaki 444-8585 and Kuboshima, Norihiro and Akimatsu, Hiroshi and Ota, Shinichi and Ohsumi, Mariko and Ohsumi, Yoshinori},
abstractNote = {Autophagy is a process whereby cytoplasmic proteins and organelles are sequestered for bulk degradation in the vacuole/lysosome. At present, 16 ATG genes have been found that are essential for autophagosome formation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Most of these genes are also involved in the cytoplasm to vacuole transport pathway, which shares machinery with autophagy. Most Atg proteins are colocalized at the pre-autophagosomal structure (PAS), from which the autophagosome is thought to originate, but the precise mechanism of autophagy remains poorly understood. During a genetic screen aimed to obtain novel gene(s) required for autophagy, we identified a novel ORF, ATG29/YPL166w. atg29{delta} cells were sensitive to starvation and induction of autophagy was severely retarded. However, the Cvt pathway operated normally. Therefore, ATG29 is an ATG gene specifically required for autophagy. Additionally, an Atg29-GFP fusion protein was observed to localize to the PAS. From these results, we propose that Atg29 functions in autophagosome formation at the PAS in collaboration with other Atg proteins.},
doi = {10.1016/J.BBRC.2005.1},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 4,
volume = 338,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 30 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Fri Dec 30 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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