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Title: Subzero-temperature stabilization and spectroscopic characterization of homogeneous oxyferrous complexes of the cytochrome P450 BM3 (CYP102) oxygenase domain and holoenzyme

Abstract

We describe herein for the first time the formation and spectroscopic characterization of homogeneous oxyferrous complexes of the cytochrome P450 BM3 (CYP102) holoenzyme and heme domain (BMP) at -55 {sup o}C using a 70/30 (v/v) glycerol/buffer cryosolvent. The choice of buffer is a crucial factor with Tris [tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane] buffer being significantly more effective than phosphate. The oxyferrous complexes have been characterized with magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy and the resulting spectra compared to those of the more well-characterized oxyferrous cytochrome P450-CAM. The formation of a stable substrate-bound oxyferrous CYP BM3 holoenzyme, despite the fact that it has the necessary reducing equivalents for turnover, indicates that electron transfer from the flavin domain to the oxyferrous center is very slow at this temperature. The ability to prepare stable homogeneous oxyferrous derivatives of both BMP and the CYP BM3 holoenzyme will enable these species to be used as starting materials for mechanistic investigation of dioxygen activation.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)
  2. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, NC 27402 (United States)
  3. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States) and School of Medicine, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States). E-mail: dawson@sc.edu
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20793203
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 338; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2005.08.078; PII: S0006-291X(05)01791-2; Copyright (c) 2005 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BUFFERS; COMPLEXES; COMPUTER-AIDED MANUFACTURING; ELECTRON TRANSFER; GLYCEROL; HEME; IRON; MAGNETIC CIRCULAR DICHROISM; PHOSPHATES; SPECTROSCOPY; STABILIZATION; SUBSTRATES

Citation Formats

Perera, Roshan, Sono, Masanori, Raner, Gregory M., and Dawson, John H. Subzero-temperature stabilization and spectroscopic characterization of homogeneous oxyferrous complexes of the cytochrome P450 BM3 (CYP102) oxygenase domain and holoenzyme. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2005.0.
Perera, Roshan, Sono, Masanori, Raner, Gregory M., & Dawson, John H. Subzero-temperature stabilization and spectroscopic characterization of homogeneous oxyferrous complexes of the cytochrome P450 BM3 (CYP102) oxygenase domain and holoenzyme. United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2005.0.
Perera, Roshan, Sono, Masanori, Raner, Gregory M., and Dawson, John H. Fri . "Subzero-temperature stabilization and spectroscopic characterization of homogeneous oxyferrous complexes of the cytochrome P450 BM3 (CYP102) oxygenase domain and holoenzyme". United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2005.0.
@article{osti_20793203,
title = {Subzero-temperature stabilization and spectroscopic characterization of homogeneous oxyferrous complexes of the cytochrome P450 BM3 (CYP102) oxygenase domain and holoenzyme},
author = {Perera, Roshan and Sono, Masanori and Raner, Gregory M. and Dawson, John H.},
abstractNote = {We describe herein for the first time the formation and spectroscopic characterization of homogeneous oxyferrous complexes of the cytochrome P450 BM3 (CYP102) holoenzyme and heme domain (BMP) at -55 {sup o}C using a 70/30 (v/v) glycerol/buffer cryosolvent. The choice of buffer is a crucial factor with Tris [tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane] buffer being significantly more effective than phosphate. The oxyferrous complexes have been characterized with magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy and the resulting spectra compared to those of the more well-characterized oxyferrous cytochrome P450-CAM. The formation of a stable substrate-bound oxyferrous CYP BM3 holoenzyme, despite the fact that it has the necessary reducing equivalents for turnover, indicates that electron transfer from the flavin domain to the oxyferrous center is very slow at this temperature. The ability to prepare stable homogeneous oxyferrous derivatives of both BMP and the CYP BM3 holoenzyme will enable these species to be used as starting materials for mechanistic investigation of dioxygen activation.},
doi = {10.1016/J.BBRC.2005.0},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 1,
volume = 338,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 09 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Fri Dec 09 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
  • No abstract prepared.
  • Research highlights: {yields} Mutations in POR identified from patients lead to reduced HO-1 activities. {yields} POR mutation Y181D affecting FMN binding results in total loss of HO-1 activity. {yields} POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F, lost 50-70% activity. {yields} Mutations in FAD binding domain, R457H, Y459H and V492E lost all HO-1 activity. {yields} POR polymorphisms P228L, R316W, G413S, A503V and G504R have normal activity. -- Abstract: Human heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) carries out heme catabolism supported by electrons supplied from the NADPH through NADPH P450 reductase (POR, CPR). Previously we have shown that mutations in human POR cause a rare formmore » of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of mutations in POR on HO-1 activity. We used purified preparations of wild type and mutant human POR and in vitro reconstitution with purified HO-1 to measure heme degradation in a coupled assay using biliverdin reductase. Here we show that mutations in POR found in patients may reduce HO-1 activity, potentially influencing heme catabolism in individuals carrying mutant POR alleles. POR mutants Y181D, A457H, Y459H, V492E and R616X had total loss of HO-1 activity, while POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F lost 50-70% activity. The POR variants P228L, R316W and G413S, A503V and G504R identified as polymorphs had close to WT activity. Loss of HO-1 activity may result in increased oxidative neurotoxicity, anemia, growth retardation and iron deposition. Further examination of patients affected with POR deficiency will be required to assess the metabolic effects of reduced HO-1 activity in affected individuals.« less
  • NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) reductase domains are members of the FAD-FMN family of proteins. The FAD accepts two reducing equivalents from NADPH (dehydrogenase flavin) and FMN acts as a one-electron carrier (flavodoxin-type flavin) for the transfer from NADPH to the heme protein, in which the FMNH {sup {center_dot}}/FMNH{sub 2} couple donates electrons to cytochrome P450 at constant oxidation-reduction potential. Although the interflavin electron transfer between FAD and FMN is not strictly regulated in CPR, electron transfer is activated in neuronal NOS reductase domain upon binding calmodulin (CaM), in which the CaM-bound activated form canmore » function by a similar mechanism to that of CPR. The oxygenated form and spin state of substrate-bound cytochrome P450 in perfused rat liver are also discussed in terms of stepwise one-electron transfer from CPR. This review provides a historical perspective of the microsomal mixed-function oxidases including CPR and P450. In addition, a new model for the redox-linked conformational changes during the catalytic cycle for both CPR and NOS reductase domain is also discussed.« less