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Title: Title V permitting delayed for some non-major sources

Abstract

Some small businesses subject to the Clean Air Act`s maximum achievable control technology (MACT) regulations may be a break from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). While the businesses, considered non-major air-pollutant sources, must still meet all MACT requirements, they are likely to receive a Title V operating permit program deferral. On December 13, 1995, EPA proposed to defer Title V operating permit requirements for non-major sources in the following three industries: decorative chromium electroplating and chromium anodizing; perchloroethylene dry cleaning; ethylene oxide commercial sterilization and fumigation. In addition to describing its reasons for the temporary deferments, EPA sets forth the rationale for permanently exempting certain non-major electroplating and anodizing sources. This rationale may pave the way for small businesses in other industries to escape Title V.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
207913
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Pollution Engineering; Journal Volume: 28; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: PBD: Mar 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; CLEAN AIR ACTS; IMPLEMENTATION; CHROMIUM; POLLUTION SOURCES; CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS; ETHYLENE; METAL INDUSTRY; AIR POLLUTION ABATEMENT; CHEMICAL INDUSTRY; SMALL BUSINESSES; AIR POLLUTION; LICENSES

Citation Formats

Bassett, S.M. Title V permitting delayed for some non-major sources. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Bassett, S.M. Title V permitting delayed for some non-major sources. United States.
Bassett, S.M. Fri . "Title V permitting delayed for some non-major sources". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_207913,
title = {Title V permitting delayed for some non-major sources},
author = {Bassett, S.M.},
abstractNote = {Some small businesses subject to the Clean Air Act`s maximum achievable control technology (MACT) regulations may be a break from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). While the businesses, considered non-major air-pollutant sources, must still meet all MACT requirements, they are likely to receive a Title V operating permit program deferral. On December 13, 1995, EPA proposed to defer Title V operating permit requirements for non-major sources in the following three industries: decorative chromium electroplating and chromium anodizing; perchloroethylene dry cleaning; ethylene oxide commercial sterilization and fumigation. In addition to describing its reasons for the temporary deferments, EPA sets forth the rationale for permanently exempting certain non-major electroplating and anodizing sources. This rationale may pave the way for small businesses in other industries to escape Title V.},
doi = {},
journal = {Pollution Engineering},
number = 3,
volume = 28,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1996},
month = {Fri Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1996}
}