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Title: STI571 (Gleevec) improves tumor growth delay and survival in irradiated mouse models of glioblastoma

Abstract

Purpose: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a devastating brain neoplasm that is essentially incurable. Although radiation therapy prolongs survival, GBMs progress within areas of irradiation. Recent studies in invertebrates have shown that STI571 (Gleevec; Novartis, East Hanover, NJ) enhances the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation. In the present study, the effectiveness of STI571 in combination with radiation was studied in mouse models of GBM. Methods and Materials: Murine GL261 and human D54 GBM cell lines formed tumors in brains and hind limbs of C57BL6 and nude mice, respectively. GL261 and D54 cells were treated with 5 {mu}mol/L of STI571 for 1 h and/or irradiated with 3 Gy. Protein was analyzed by Western immunoblots probed with antibodies to caspase 3, cleaved caspase 3, phospho-Akt, Akt, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) {alpha} and {beta}. Tumor volumes were assessed in mice bearing GL261 or D54 tumors treated with 21 Gy administered in seven fractionated doses. Histologic sections from STI571-treated mice were stained with phospho-Akt and phospho-PDGFR {beta} antibodies. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to study the response of mice bearing intracranial implants of GL261. Results: STI571 penetrated the blood-brain barrier, which resulted in a reduction in phospho-PDGFR in GBM. STI571-induced apoptosis in GBM wasmore » significantly enhanced by irradiation. STI571 combined with irradiation induced caspase 3 cleavage in GBM cells. Glioblastoma multiforme response to therapy correlated with an increase in tumor growth delay and survival when STI571 was administered in conjunction with daily irradiation. Conclusion: These findings suggest that STI571 has the potential to augment radiotherapy and thereby improve median survival.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)
  2. Department of Biostatistics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)
  3. Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States) and Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States) and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN (United States). E-mail: Dennis.Hallahan@mcmail.vanderbilt.edu
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20788294
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 64; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2005.08.025; PII: S0360-3016(05)02387-4; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ANTIBODIES; BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER; BRAIN; GLIOMAS; GROWTH; GROWTH FACTORS; INVERTEBRATES; IONIZING RADIATIONS; IRRADIATION; LIMBS; MICE; RADIATION SOURCE IMPLANTS; RADIOTHERAPY; RECEPTORS; SURVIVAL CURVES; TOXICITY

Citation Formats

Geng Ling, Shinohara, Eric T., Kim, Dong, Tan Jiahuai, Osusky, Kate, Shyr, Yu, and Hallahan, Dennis E. STI571 (Gleevec) improves tumor growth delay and survival in irradiated mouse models of glioblastoma. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
Geng Ling, Shinohara, Eric T., Kim, Dong, Tan Jiahuai, Osusky, Kate, Shyr, Yu, & Hallahan, Dennis E. STI571 (Gleevec) improves tumor growth delay and survival in irradiated mouse models of glioblastoma. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
Geng Ling, Shinohara, Eric T., Kim, Dong, Tan Jiahuai, Osusky, Kate, Shyr, Yu, and Hallahan, Dennis E. Sun . "STI571 (Gleevec) improves tumor growth delay and survival in irradiated mouse models of glioblastoma". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
@article{osti_20788294,
title = {STI571 (Gleevec) improves tumor growth delay and survival in irradiated mouse models of glioblastoma},
author = {Geng Ling and Shinohara, Eric T. and Kim, Dong and Tan Jiahuai and Osusky, Kate and Shyr, Yu and Hallahan, Dennis E.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a devastating brain neoplasm that is essentially incurable. Although radiation therapy prolongs survival, GBMs progress within areas of irradiation. Recent studies in invertebrates have shown that STI571 (Gleevec; Novartis, East Hanover, NJ) enhances the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation. In the present study, the effectiveness of STI571 in combination with radiation was studied in mouse models of GBM. Methods and Materials: Murine GL261 and human D54 GBM cell lines formed tumors in brains and hind limbs of C57BL6 and nude mice, respectively. GL261 and D54 cells were treated with 5 {mu}mol/L of STI571 for 1 h and/or irradiated with 3 Gy. Protein was analyzed by Western immunoblots probed with antibodies to caspase 3, cleaved caspase 3, phospho-Akt, Akt, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) {alpha} and {beta}. Tumor volumes were assessed in mice bearing GL261 or D54 tumors treated with 21 Gy administered in seven fractionated doses. Histologic sections from STI571-treated mice were stained with phospho-Akt and phospho-PDGFR {beta} antibodies. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to study the response of mice bearing intracranial implants of GL261. Results: STI571 penetrated the blood-brain barrier, which resulted in a reduction in phospho-PDGFR in GBM. STI571-induced apoptosis in GBM was significantly enhanced by irradiation. STI571 combined with irradiation induced caspase 3 cleavage in GBM cells. Glioblastoma multiforme response to therapy correlated with an increase in tumor growth delay and survival when STI571 was administered in conjunction with daily irradiation. Conclusion: These findings suggest that STI571 has the potential to augment radiotherapy and thereby improve median survival.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 1,
volume = 64,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Purpose: The combination of irradiation and the antiangiogenic compound SU5416 was tested and compared with irradiation alone in a human glioblastoma tumor line xenografted in nude mice. The aim of this study was to monitor microenvironmental changes and growth delay. Methods and materials: A human glioblastoma xenograft tumor line was implanted in nude mice. Irradiations consisted of 10 Gy or 20 Gy with and without SU5416. Several microenvironmental parameters (tumor cell hypoxia, tumor blood perfusion, vascular volume, and microvascular density) were analyzed after imunohistochemical staining. Tumor growth delay was monitored for up to 200 days after treatment. Results: SU5416, whenmore » combined with irradiation, has an additive effect over treatment with irradiation alone. Analysis of the tumor microenvironment showed a decreased vascular density during treatment with SU5416. In tumors regrowing after reaching only a partial remission, vascular characteristics normalized shortly after cessation of SU5416. However, in tumors regrowing after reaching a complete remission, permanent microenvironmental changes and an increase of tumor necrosis with a subsequent slower tumor regrowth was found. Conclusions: Permanent vascular changes were seen after combined treatment resulting in complete remission. Antiangiogenic treatment with SU5416 when combined with irradiation has an additive effect over treatment with irradiation or antiangiogenic treatment alone.« less
  • The radiation response of multicellular spheroids, initiated from a human melanoma xenograft (E.E.) propagated in athymic mice, was studied using cell survival, growth delay, and spheroid cure as endpoints. The relationship between these endpoints was analyzed, and the radiation response of the spheroids was compared with the parent xenograft. At irradiation, the spheroids were 100 +/- 5 micron in diameter and did not contain radiobiologically hypoxic cells. Growth delay of the spheroids mainly depended on the fraction of surviving cells as measured in soft agar, that is, there was a good correlation between these two endpoints. Moreover, Do-values calculated frommore » spheroid cure curves were similar to those of the cell survival curves measured in soft agar. However, the number of stem cells per spheroid, calculated from SCD50-values (the doses required to cure 50% of the spheroids), was at least a factor of seven lower than the clonogenicity of cells from disaggregated spheroids would indicate. The cellular radiosensitivity of the spheroids was similar to the parent xenograft. An intercellular contact effect was not found for the spheroids, in agreement with observations from studies of xenografted tumors. Moreover, specific growth delays, as well as Do-values calculated from cure curves were similar for spheroids and tumors when the data for the latter were corrected for the presence of hypoxic cells. The high degree of conformity in the results indicates that multicellular spheroids and xenografted tumors may complement one another in studies of human tumor radiobiology.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the effect of vascular endothelial growth factor VEGF Trap (Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Tarrytown, NY), a humanized soluble vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor protein, and radiation (RT) on tumor growth in U87 glioblastoma xenografts in nude mice. Methods and Materials: U87 cell suspensions were implanted subcutaneously into hind limbs of nude mice. VEGF Trap (2.5-25 mg/kg) was administered every 3 days for 3 weeks alone or in combination with a single dose of 10 Gy or fractionated RT (3 x 5 Gy). In addition, three scheduling protocols for VEGF Trap plus fractionated RT were examined. Results: Improved tumormore » control was seen when RT (either single dose or fractionated doses) was combined with the lowest dose of VEGF Trap (2.5 mg/kg). Scheduling did not significantly affect the efficacy of combined therapy. Although high-dose VEGF Trap (10 mg/kg or 25 mg/kg) significantly reduced tumor growth over that of RT alone, there was no additional benefit to combining high-dose VEGF Trap with RT. Conclusions: Vascular endothelial growth factor Trap plus radiation is clearly better than radiation alone in a U87 subcutaneous xenograft model. Although high doses of VEGF Trap alone are highly efficacious, it is unclear whether such high doses can be used clinically without incurring normal tissue toxicities. Thus, information on lower doses of VEGF Trap and ionizing radiation is of clinical relevance.« less
  • Purpose: To examine the addition of genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) to radiation therapy (RT) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) inhibition (ie trimodality therapy) for soft-tissue sarcoma. Methods and Materials: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α was inhibited using short hairpin RNA or low metronomic doses of doxorubicin, which blocks HIF-1α binding to DNA. Trimodality therapy was examined in a mouse xenograft model and a genetically engineered mouse model of sarcoma, as well as in vitro in tumor endothelial cells (ECs) and 4 sarcoma cell lines. Results: In both mouse models, any monotherapy or bimodality therapy resulted in tumormore » growth beyond 250 mm{sup 3} within the 12-day treatment period, but trimodality therapy with RT, VEGF-A inhibition, and HIF-1α inhibition kept tumors at <250 mm{sup 3} for up to 30 days. Trimodality therapy on tumors reduced HIF-1α activity as measured by expression of nuclear HIF-1α by 87% to 95% compared with RT alone, and cytoplasmic carbonic anhydrase 9 by 79% to 82%. Trimodality therapy also increased EC-specific apoptosis 2- to 4-fold more than RT alone and reduced microvessel density by 75% to 82%. When tumor ECs were treated in vitro with trimodality therapy under hypoxia, there were significant decreases in proliferation and colony formation and increases in DNA damage (as measured by Comet assay and γH2AX expression) and apoptosis (as measured by cleaved caspase 3 expression). Trimodality therapy had much less pronounced effects when 4 sarcoma cell lines were examined in these same assays. Conclusions: Inhibition of HIF-1α is highly effective when combined with RT and VEGF-A inhibition in blocking sarcoma growth by maximizing DNA damage and apoptosis in tumor ECs, leading to loss of tumor vasculature.« less