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Title: An electron transparent proton detector for neutron decay studies

Abstract

We have developed an ultrathin (<100 nm), very strong polyimide foil which can span more than 6x6 cm{sup 2} and is ideal for the fabrication of low energy proton detectors. We have produced a proton detector geometry in which protons incident on the foil with kinetic energies greater than about 25 keV produce, on average, more than ten secondary electrons in a conversion crystal evaporated on the back face of the foil. These secondary electrons can be ''postaccelerated'' and counted in a variety of detectors. The polyimide foils are much more durable than carbon foils previously used in similar detection geometries. LiF was chosen as the conversion crystal, which is relatively insensitive to exposure to air, improving their secondary electron yield under typical operating conditions. In addition, we describe the operation of a very simple, small scale proton accelerator and detector testing chamber capable of providing up to 10 kHz of beam with energies between 10 and 50 keV onto a biased target with a maximum ion contamination of 0.5%.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Triangle University Nuclear Laboratory, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20788097
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 99; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2186970; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ACCELERATORS; AIR; CARBON; CRYSTALS; ELECTRONS; FOILS; GEOMETRY; KEV RANGE 10-100; KHZ RANGE 01-100; KINETIC ENERGY; LITHIUM FLUORIDES; NEUTRONS; PROTON DETECTION; PROTONS

Citation Formats

Hoedl, S. A., Young, A. R., Ade, H., Lozano, A., Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695, and Department of Chemical Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695. An electron transparent proton detector for neutron decay studies. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2186970.
Hoedl, S. A., Young, A. R., Ade, H., Lozano, A., Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695, & Department of Chemical Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695. An electron transparent proton detector for neutron decay studies. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2186970.
Hoedl, S. A., Young, A. R., Ade, H., Lozano, A., Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695, and Department of Chemical Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695. Sat . "An electron transparent proton detector for neutron decay studies". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2186970.
@article{osti_20788097,
title = {An electron transparent proton detector for neutron decay studies},
author = {Hoedl, S. A. and Young, A. R. and Ade, H. and Lozano, A. and Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 and Department of Chemical Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695},
abstractNote = {We have developed an ultrathin (<100 nm), very strong polyimide foil which can span more than 6x6 cm{sup 2} and is ideal for the fabrication of low energy proton detectors. We have produced a proton detector geometry in which protons incident on the foil with kinetic energies greater than about 25 keV produce, on average, more than ten secondary electrons in a conversion crystal evaporated on the back face of the foil. These secondary electrons can be ''postaccelerated'' and counted in a variety of detectors. The polyimide foils are much more durable than carbon foils previously used in similar detection geometries. LiF was chosen as the conversion crystal, which is relatively insensitive to exposure to air, improving their secondary electron yield under typical operating conditions. In addition, we describe the operation of a very simple, small scale proton accelerator and detector testing chamber capable of providing up to 10 kHz of beam with energies between 10 and 50 keV onto a biased target with a maximum ion contamination of 0.5%.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2186970},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 8,
volume = 99,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}