skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Binary Ni-Nb bulk metallic glasses

Abstract

We studied the glass forming ability of Ni-Nb binary alloys and found that some of the alloys can be prepared into bulk metallic glasses by a conventional Cu-mold casting. The best glass former within the compositional range studied is off-eutectic Ni{sub 62}Nb{sub 38} alloy, which is markedly different from those predicted by the multicomponent and deep eutectic rules. The glass formation mechanism for binary Ni-Nb alloys was studied from the thermodynamic point of view and a parameter {gamma}* was proposed to approach the ability of glass formation against crystallization.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [3]
  1. Center for Advanced Microanalysis, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)
  2. (China) and Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100080 (China)
  3. (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20787806
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 99; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2158130; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; BINARY ALLOY SYSTEMS; CASTING MOLDS; CRYSTALLIZATION; EUTECTICS; METALLIC GLASSES; NICKEL ALLOYS; NIOBIUM ALLOYS; VITRIFICATION

Citation Formats

Xia, L., Li, W.H., Fang, S.S., Wei, B.C., Dong, Y.D., Center for Advanced Microanalysis, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444, Center for Advanced Microanalysis, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100080, and Center for Advanced Microanalysis, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444. Binary Ni-Nb bulk metallic glasses. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2158130.
Xia, L., Li, W.H., Fang, S.S., Wei, B.C., Dong, Y.D., Center for Advanced Microanalysis, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444, Center for Advanced Microanalysis, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100080, & Center for Advanced Microanalysis, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444. Binary Ni-Nb bulk metallic glasses. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2158130.
Xia, L., Li, W.H., Fang, S.S., Wei, B.C., Dong, Y.D., Center for Advanced Microanalysis, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444, Center for Advanced Microanalysis, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100080, and Center for Advanced Microanalysis, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444. Sun . "Binary Ni-Nb bulk metallic glasses". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2158130.
@article{osti_20787806,
title = {Binary Ni-Nb bulk metallic glasses},
author = {Xia, L. and Li, W.H. and Fang, S.S. and Wei, B.C. and Dong, Y.D. and Center for Advanced Microanalysis, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 and Center for Advanced Microanalysis, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 and Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100080 and Center for Advanced Microanalysis, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444},
abstractNote = {We studied the glass forming ability of Ni-Nb binary alloys and found that some of the alloys can be prepared into bulk metallic glasses by a conventional Cu-mold casting. The best glass former within the compositional range studied is off-eutectic Ni{sub 62}Nb{sub 38} alloy, which is markedly different from those predicted by the multicomponent and deep eutectic rules. The glass formation mechanism for binary Ni-Nb alloys was studied from the thermodynamic point of view and a parameter {gamma}* was proposed to approach the ability of glass formation against crystallization.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2158130},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 99,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • The heating rate dependencies of the glass transition temperature of the Ni{sub 65}Nb{sub 35}, Ni{sub 60}Nb{sub 35}Sn{sub 5}, Ni{sub 59.35}Nb{sub 34.45}Sn{sub 6.2}, Ni{sub 60}(Nb{sub 40}Ta{sub 60}){sub 34}Sn{sub 6}, and Ni{sub 57}Fe{sub 3}Nb{sub 35}Sn{sub 5} metallic glass-forming alloys were investigated with a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The relaxation time for each DSC experiment was plotted versus inverse temperature, and a Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman (VFT)-type relation was fitted to the data. The fragilities of the alloys were characterized with the fragility parameter, D*, and the VFT temperature, T{sub 0}, which are the fit parameters from the VFT relation. It was found that for themore » binary alloy D*=6.2, for the ternary alloys D*=11.0, and that for the quaternary alloys D* was between 16.4 and 19.0. These D* increase monotonically as the number of components in the alloy is increased. It was also found that the fragilities of Zr-based alloys show a similar trend.« less
  • Due to their scientific significance and potential engineering applications, bulk metallic glasses are among the most intensively studied advanced materials. Understanding the glass-forming ability (GFA) of these metallic alloys is a long-standing subject. While a large number of empirical factors have been proposed to correlate with GFA of the alloys, a full understanding of GFA remains a goal to achieve. Since glass formation is a competing process against crystallization, we have performed a systematic analysis on the crystallization kinetics of two known best metallic glass-formers Pd{sub 40}Cu{sub 30}Ni{sub 10}P{sub 20} (in at. %) and Zr{sub 41.2}Ti{sub 13.8}Cu{sub 12.5}Ni{sub 10}Be{sub 22.5}more » based on classical nucleation and growth theory. Our results show that there is a dramatic difference between the two alloys in their nucleation behavior although they possess comparable GFA. Particularly, an extremely sharp nucleation peak ({approx}10{sup 18}/m{sup 3} s) is found for Pd{sub 40}Cu{sub 30}Ni{sub 10}P{sub 20} around 632 K with a very small half maximum width of 42 K, implying that this alloy is an excellent candidate for nanocrystallization studies. Moreover, we have also found that the GFA of these alloys can be calculated to a high accuracy and precision based on the classical theory, suggesting that the classical theory may be sufficient to account for glass formation mechanism in these metallic alloys.« less
  • A binary Ti{sub 50}Cu{sub 50} martensitic alloy having similar atomic clusters to (TiCu)-based martensitic bulk metallic glasses presents a large plastic strain of 18.04% with high fracture strength of 1705 MPa. Detailed microstructural investigations point out that martensite embedded in {gamma}-TiCu matrix is effective to dissipate localization of the shear stress thus leading to rotational propagation, interaction, and multiplication of the shear bands. Furthermore, the propagation of microcracks formed by local stress transition during deformation is hindered by the martensite.
  • Results of calorimetric, differential thermal analysis, and structural measurements are presented for a series of bulk metallic glass forming compositions in the Zr[endash]Ti[endash]Cu[endash]Ni[endash]Be alloy system. The calorimetric data for five alloys, prepared along the tie line between phase separating and nonphase separating compositions, show that the transition from phase separating to nonphase separating behavior is smooth. The bulk glasses near the center of the tie line exhibit large supercooled liquid regions: [Delta]T[approx]135 K, the largest known for a bulk metallic glass. [copyright] [ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.]
  • Formation of bulk metallic glass in quaternary Ti--Zr--Cu--Ni alloys by relatively slow cooling from the melt is reported. Thick strips of metallic glass were obtained by the method of metal mold casting. The glass forming ability of the quaternary alloys exceeds that of binary or ternary alloys containing the same elements due to the complexity of the system. The best glass forming alloys such as Ti{sub 34}Zr{sub 11}Cu{sub 47}Ni{sub 8} can be cast to at least 4-mm-thick amorphous strips. The critical cooling rate for glass formation is of the order of 250 K/s or less, at least two orders ofmore » magnitude lower than that of the best ternary alloys. The glass transition, crystallization, and melting behavior of the alloys were studied by differential scanning calorimetry. The amorphous alloys exhibit a significant undercooled liquid region between the glass transition and first crystallization event. The glass forming ability of these alloys, as determined by the critical cooling rate, exceeds what is expected based on the reduced glass transition temperature. It is also found that the glass forming ability for alloys of similar reduced glass transition temperature can differ by two orders of magnitude as defined by critical cooling rates. The origins of the difference in glass forming ability of the alloys are discussed. It is found that when large composition redistribution accompanies crystallization, glass formation is enhanced. The excellent glass forming ability of alloys such as Ti{sub 34}Zr{sub 11}Cu{sub 47}Ni{sub 8} is a result of simultaneously minimizing the nucleation rate of the competing crystalline phases. The ternary/quaternary Laves phase (MgZn{sub 2} type) shows the greatest ease of nucleation and plays a key role in determining the optimum compositions for glass formation. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.« less