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Title: Initial stage of InAs growth on Si (001) studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

Abstract

The initial stage of InAs growth on Si (001) substrate was studied via high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis. InAs of thickness less than 1 monolayer grown by molecular beam epitaxy was found to form islands at the onset of the growth, i.e., it follows the Volmer-Weber growth mode. By the introduction of 60 deg. and 90 deg. dislocations, the misfit strain was relieved at the early growth stage for island size as small as 10 nm. The average distance between the 60 deg. dislocations is approximately 2 nm, indicating nearly complete strain relaxation. The shape evolution of individual islands reveals the transition from pyramidal shape with (111) facets for island diameters smaller than 15 nm to dome shape for island diameters larger than 20 nm.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)
  2. (CEMD), McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4L7 (Canada)
  3. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20787726
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 98; Journal Issue: 12; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2149164; (c) 2005 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CRYSTAL GROWTH; DISLOCATIONS; INDIUM ARSENIDES; INTERFACES; LAYERS; MAGNETIC ISLANDS; MOLECULAR BEAM EPITAXY; RELAXATION; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; SILICON; SUBSTRATES; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Zhao, Z.M., Hulko, O., Yoon, T.S., Xie, Y.H., Center for Electrophotonic Materials and Devices, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095. Initial stage of InAs growth on Si (001) studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2149164.
Zhao, Z.M., Hulko, O., Yoon, T.S., Xie, Y.H., Center for Electrophotonic Materials and Devices, & Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095. Initial stage of InAs growth on Si (001) studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2149164.
Zhao, Z.M., Hulko, O., Yoon, T.S., Xie, Y.H., Center for Electrophotonic Materials and Devices, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095. Thu . "Initial stage of InAs growth on Si (001) studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2149164.
@article{osti_20787726,
title = {Initial stage of InAs growth on Si (001) studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy},
author = {Zhao, Z.M. and Hulko, O. and Yoon, T.S. and Xie, Y.H. and Center for Electrophotonic Materials and Devices and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095},
abstractNote = {The initial stage of InAs growth on Si (001) substrate was studied via high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis. InAs of thickness less than 1 monolayer grown by molecular beam epitaxy was found to form islands at the onset of the growth, i.e., it follows the Volmer-Weber growth mode. By the introduction of 60 deg. and 90 deg. dislocations, the misfit strain was relieved at the early growth stage for island size as small as 10 nm. The average distance between the 60 deg. dislocations is approximately 2 nm, indicating nearly complete strain relaxation. The shape evolution of individual islands reveals the transition from pyramidal shape with (111) facets for island diameters smaller than 15 nm to dome shape for island diameters larger than 20 nm.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2149164},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 12,
volume = 98,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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