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Title: Structure, twinning behavior, and interface composition of epitaxial Si(111) films on hex-Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001)/Si(111) support systems

Abstract

The structure of epitaxial Si overlayers on a hexagonal Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001)/Si(111) substrate system was investigated by a combination of x-ray reflectivity, specular x-ray diffraction, off-specular grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3} film grows on the Si(111) substrate in the (0001)-oriented hexagonal phase matching the in-plane symmetry by aligning the [1010] oxide along the bulk [011] Si direction. The hexagonal Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) surface induces the growth of [111]-oriented cubic-Si epilayers exhibiting a microstructure which is composed of two types of domains. The ABC-stacked domains preserve the crystal orientation of the substrate, while the CBA-stacked domains are rotated by 180 deg. . A depth profile of the chemical composition of the epi-Si/Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si(111) material stack was recorded by combining ion-beam sputtering techniques with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. IHP-Microelectronics, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany)
  2. (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20787722
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 98; Journal Issue: 12; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2149186; (c) 2005 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; CRYSTALS; EPITAXY; INTERFACES; ION BEAMS; LAYERS; MICROSTRUCTURE; PRASEODYMIUM OXIDES; REFLECTIVITY; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; SILICON; SPUTTERING; SUBSTRATES; THIN FILMS; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; TWINNING; X-RAY DIFFRACTION; X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Schroeder, T., Zaumseil, P., Weidner, G., Lupina, G., Wenger, Ch., Muessig, H.-J., Storck, P., and SILTRONIC AG, PF 1140, 84479 Burghausen. Structure, twinning behavior, and interface composition of epitaxial Si(111) films on hex-Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001)/Si(111) support systems. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2149186.
Schroeder, T., Zaumseil, P., Weidner, G., Lupina, G., Wenger, Ch., Muessig, H.-J., Storck, P., & SILTRONIC AG, PF 1140, 84479 Burghausen. Structure, twinning behavior, and interface composition of epitaxial Si(111) films on hex-Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001)/Si(111) support systems. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2149186.
Schroeder, T., Zaumseil, P., Weidner, G., Lupina, G., Wenger, Ch., Muessig, H.-J., Storck, P., and SILTRONIC AG, PF 1140, 84479 Burghausen. Thu . "Structure, twinning behavior, and interface composition of epitaxial Si(111) films on hex-Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001)/Si(111) support systems". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2149186.
@article{osti_20787722,
title = {Structure, twinning behavior, and interface composition of epitaxial Si(111) films on hex-Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001)/Si(111) support systems},
author = {Schroeder, T. and Zaumseil, P. and Weidner, G. and Lupina, G. and Wenger, Ch. and Muessig, H.-J. and Storck, P. and SILTRONIC AG, PF 1140, 84479 Burghausen},
abstractNote = {The structure of epitaxial Si overlayers on a hexagonal Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001)/Si(111) substrate system was investigated by a combination of x-ray reflectivity, specular x-ray diffraction, off-specular grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3} film grows on the Si(111) substrate in the (0001)-oriented hexagonal phase matching the in-plane symmetry by aligning the [1010] oxide along the bulk [011] Si direction. The hexagonal Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) surface induces the growth of [111]-oriented cubic-Si epilayers exhibiting a microstructure which is composed of two types of domains. The ABC-stacked domains preserve the crystal orientation of the substrate, while the CBA-stacked domains are rotated by 180 deg. . A depth profile of the chemical composition of the epi-Si/Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si(111) material stack was recorded by combining ion-beam sputtering techniques with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2149186},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 12,
volume = 98,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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