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Title: Compact soft x-ray source using Thomson scattering

Abstract

A compact soft x-ray source using Thomson scattering, enabled by the combination of a picosecond laser and an electron rf gun, was developed aiming at biological studies such as those using an x-ray microscope. The x-ray source included both a photoinjector system and a picosecond laser system with a tabletop size of 2x2 m{sup 2}. An infrared laser beam ({lambda}{sub 0}=1047 nm) was obtained from an all-solid-state mode-locked Nd:YLF laser system and injected into the photocathode of an accelerator system. A 4.2 MeV electron beam was generated from a laser-driven photocathode rf gun system. The residual laser beam was amplified up to about 4.2 mJ/pulse using a flash-lamp-pumped laser amplifier. Upon collision of the electron beam with the amplified laser beam, 300 eV soft x rays were generated by Thomson backscattering. The stable interaction between the two beams was achieved using the same seed laser pulse for irradiating the photocathode and the scattering process with laser photons.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 169-8555 (Japan)
  2. (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20787716
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 98; Journal Issue: 12; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2148619; (c) 2005 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ACCELERATORS; BACKSCATTERING; ELECTRON BEAMS; ELECTRON COLLISIONS; EV RANGE 100-1000; MEV RANGE 01-10; MICROSCOPES; MODE LOCKING; NEODYMIUM LASERS; OPTICS; PHOTOCATHODES; PULSES; SOFT X RADIATION; THOMSON SCATTERING; X-RAY SOURCES

Citation Formats

Kashiwagi, Shigeru, Kuroda, Ryunosuke, Oshima, Takashi, Nagasawa, Fumio, Kobuki, Tomoaki, Ueyama, Daisuke, Hama, Yoshimasa, Washio, Masakazu, Ushida, Kiminori, Hayano, Hitoshi, Urakawa, Junji, RIKEN, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198, and KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801. Compact soft x-ray source using Thomson scattering. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2148619.
Kashiwagi, Shigeru, Kuroda, Ryunosuke, Oshima, Takashi, Nagasawa, Fumio, Kobuki, Tomoaki, Ueyama, Daisuke, Hama, Yoshimasa, Washio, Masakazu, Ushida, Kiminori, Hayano, Hitoshi, Urakawa, Junji, RIKEN, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198, & KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801. Compact soft x-ray source using Thomson scattering. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2148619.
Kashiwagi, Shigeru, Kuroda, Ryunosuke, Oshima, Takashi, Nagasawa, Fumio, Kobuki, Tomoaki, Ueyama, Daisuke, Hama, Yoshimasa, Washio, Masakazu, Ushida, Kiminori, Hayano, Hitoshi, Urakawa, Junji, RIKEN, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198, and KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801. Thu . "Compact soft x-ray source using Thomson scattering". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2148619.
@article{osti_20787716,
title = {Compact soft x-ray source using Thomson scattering},
author = {Kashiwagi, Shigeru and Kuroda, Ryunosuke and Oshima, Takashi and Nagasawa, Fumio and Kobuki, Tomoaki and Ueyama, Daisuke and Hama, Yoshimasa and Washio, Masakazu and Ushida, Kiminori and Hayano, Hitoshi and Urakawa, Junji and RIKEN, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 and KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801},
abstractNote = {A compact soft x-ray source using Thomson scattering, enabled by the combination of a picosecond laser and an electron rf gun, was developed aiming at biological studies such as those using an x-ray microscope. The x-ray source included both a photoinjector system and a picosecond laser system with a tabletop size of 2x2 m{sup 2}. An infrared laser beam ({lambda}{sub 0}=1047 nm) was obtained from an all-solid-state mode-locked Nd:YLF laser system and injected into the photocathode of an accelerator system. A 4.2 MeV electron beam was generated from a laser-driven photocathode rf gun system. The residual laser beam was amplified up to about 4.2 mJ/pulse using a flash-lamp-pumped laser amplifier. Upon collision of the electron beam with the amplified laser beam, 300 eV soft x rays were generated by Thomson backscattering. The stable interaction between the two beams was achieved using the same seed laser pulse for irradiating the photocathode and the scattering process with laser photons.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2148619},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 12,
volume = 98,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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