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Title: Analysis of a single-atom dipole trap

Abstract

We describe a simple experimental technique which allows us to store a single {sup 87}Rb atom in an optical dipole trap. Due to light-induced two-body collisions during the loading stage of the trap the maximum number of captured atoms is locked to one. This collisional blockade effect is confirmed by the observation of photon antibunching in the detected fluorescence light. The spectral properties of single photons emitted by the atom were studied with a narrow-band scanning cavity. We find that the atomic fluorescence spectrum is dominated by the spectral width of the exciting laser light field. In addition we observe a spectral broadening of the atomic fluorescence light due to the Doppler effect. This allows us to determine the mean kinetic energy of the trapped atom corresponding to a temperature of 105 {mu}K. This simple single-atom trap is the key element for the generation of atom-photon entanglement required for future applications in quantum communication and a first loophole-free test of Bell's inequality.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-80799 Munich (Germany)
  2. (Singapore)
  3. (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20787124
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. A; Journal Volume: 73; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.73.043406; (c) 2006 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; ATOMS; BELL THEOREM; DATA TRANSMISSION; DIPOLES; DOPPLER EFFECT; FLUORESCENCE; FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY; KINETIC ENERGY; LASER RADIATION; LINE BROADENING; PHOTON-ATOM COLLISIONS; PHOTONS; QUANTUM ENTANGLEMENT; RADIATION PRESSURE; RUBIDIUM; RUBIDIUM 87; TRAPPING; TRAPS; TWO-BODY PROBLEM; VISIBLE RADIATION

Citation Formats

Weber, Markus, Volz, Juergen, Saucke, Karen, Kurtsiefer, Christian, Weinfurter, Harald, Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore, and Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-80799 Munich, Germany and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, 85748 Garching. Analysis of a single-atom dipole trap. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0.
Weber, Markus, Volz, Juergen, Saucke, Karen, Kurtsiefer, Christian, Weinfurter, Harald, Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore, & Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-80799 Munich, Germany and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, 85748 Garching. Analysis of a single-atom dipole trap. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0.
Weber, Markus, Volz, Juergen, Saucke, Karen, Kurtsiefer, Christian, Weinfurter, Harald, Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore, and Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-80799 Munich, Germany and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, 85748 Garching. Sat . "Analysis of a single-atom dipole trap". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0.
@article{osti_20787124,
title = {Analysis of a single-atom dipole trap},
author = {Weber, Markus and Volz, Juergen and Saucke, Karen and Kurtsiefer, Christian and Weinfurter, Harald and Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore and Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-80799 Munich, Germany and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, 85748 Garching},
abstractNote = {We describe a simple experimental technique which allows us to store a single {sup 87}Rb atom in an optical dipole trap. Due to light-induced two-body collisions during the loading stage of the trap the maximum number of captured atoms is locked to one. This collisional blockade effect is confirmed by the observation of photon antibunching in the detected fluorescence light. The spectral properties of single photons emitted by the atom were studied with a narrow-band scanning cavity. We find that the atomic fluorescence spectrum is dominated by the spectral width of the exciting laser light field. In addition we observe a spectral broadening of the atomic fluorescence light due to the Doppler effect. This allows us to determine the mean kinetic energy of the trapped atom corresponding to a temperature of 105 {mu}K. This simple single-atom trap is the key element for the generation of atom-photon entanglement required for future applications in quantum communication and a first loophole-free test of Bell's inequality.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0},
journal = {Physical Review. A},
number = 4,
volume = 73,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
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  • We trap a single cesium atom in a standing-wave optical dipole trap. Special experimental procedures, designed to work with single atoms, are used to measure the oscillation frequency and the atomic energy distribution in the dipole trap. These methods rely on unambiguously detecting presence or loss of the atom using its resonance fluorescence in the magneto-optical trap.
  • No abstract prepared.
  • A single atom strongly coupled to a cavity mode is stored by three-dimensional confinement in blue-detuned cavity modes of different longitudinal and transverse order. The vanishing light intensity at the trap center reduces the light shift of all atomic energy levels. This is exploited to detect a single atom by means of a dispersive measurement with 95% confidence in 10 {mu}s, limited by the photon-detection efficiency. As the atom switches resonant cavity transmission into cavity reflection, the atom can be detected while scattering about one photon.