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Title: Dispersive properties and large Kerr nonlinearities using dipole-induced transparency in a single-sided cavity

Abstract

We calculate the dispersive properties of a single-sided cavity coupled to a single dipole. We show that when a field is resonant with the dipole and the Purcell factor exceeds the bare cavity reflection coefficient, the field experiences a {pi} phase shift relative to reflection from a bare cavity. We then show that optically Stark shifting the dipole resonance with a second field creates large Kerr nonlinearities. An approximate expression for the total number of photons needed to create a {pi} phase shift is derived.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. E. L. Ginzton Labs Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20787060
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. A; Journal Volume: 73; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.73.041803; (c) 2006 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; CAVITY RESONATORS; DIPOLES; NONLINEAR PROBLEMS; OPACITY; PHASE SHIFT; PHOTONS; REFLECTION; RESONANCE

Citation Formats

Waks, Edo, and Vuckovic, Jelena. Dispersive properties and large Kerr nonlinearities using dipole-induced transparency in a single-sided cavity. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0.
Waks, Edo, & Vuckovic, Jelena. Dispersive properties and large Kerr nonlinearities using dipole-induced transparency in a single-sided cavity. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0.
Waks, Edo, and Vuckovic, Jelena. Sat . "Dispersive properties and large Kerr nonlinearities using dipole-induced transparency in a single-sided cavity". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0.
@article{osti_20787060,
title = {Dispersive properties and large Kerr nonlinearities using dipole-induced transparency in a single-sided cavity},
author = {Waks, Edo and Vuckovic, Jelena},
abstractNote = {We calculate the dispersive properties of a single-sided cavity coupled to a single dipole. We show that when a field is resonant with the dipole and the Purcell factor exceeds the bare cavity reflection coefficient, the field experiences a {pi} phase shift relative to reflection from a bare cavity. We then show that optically Stark shifting the dipole resonance with a second field creates large Kerr nonlinearities. An approximate expression for the total number of photons needed to create a {pi} phase shift is derived.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0},
journal = {Physical Review. A},
number = 4,
volume = 73,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
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