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Title: Large magnetic storage ring for Bose-Einstein condensates

Abstract

Cold atomic clouds and Bose-Einstein condensates have been stored in a 10 cm diameter vertically oriented magnetic ring. An azimuthal magnetic field enables low-loss propagation of atomic clouds over a total distance of 2 m, with a heating rate of less than 50 nK/s. The vertical geometry was used to split an atomic cloud into two counter-rotating clouds which were recombined after one revolution. The system will be ideal for studying condensate collisions and ultimately Sagnac interferometry.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20787054
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. A; Journal Volume: 73; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.73.041606; (c) 2006 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; ATOM COLLISIONS; BOSE-EINSTEIN CONDENSATION; DISTANCE; GEOMETRY; HEATING RATE; INTERFEROMETRY; MAGNETIC FIELDS; STORAGE RINGS

Citation Formats

Arnold, A. S., Garvie, C. S., and Riis, E. Large magnetic storage ring for Bose-Einstein condensates. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0.
Arnold, A. S., Garvie, C. S., & Riis, E. Large magnetic storage ring for Bose-Einstein condensates. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0.
Arnold, A. S., Garvie, C. S., and Riis, E. Sat . "Large magnetic storage ring for Bose-Einstein condensates". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0.
@article{osti_20787054,
title = {Large magnetic storage ring for Bose-Einstein condensates},
author = {Arnold, A. S. and Garvie, C. S. and Riis, E.},
abstractNote = {Cold atomic clouds and Bose-Einstein condensates have been stored in a 10 cm diameter vertically oriented magnetic ring. An azimuthal magnetic field enables low-loss propagation of atomic clouds over a total distance of 2 m, with a heating rate of less than 50 nK/s. The vertical geometry was used to split an atomic cloud into two counter-rotating clouds which were recombined after one revolution. The system will be ideal for studying condensate collisions and ultimately Sagnac interferometry.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0},
journal = {Physical Review. A},
number = 4,
volume = 73,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
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