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Title: Photon frequency-mode matching using acousto-optic frequency beam splitters

Abstract

It is a difficult engineering task to create distinct solid state single photon sources which nonetheless emit photons at the same frequency. It is also hard to create entangled photon pairs from quantum dots. In the spirit of quantum engineering we propose a simple optical circuit which can, in the right circumstances, make frequency distinguishable photons frequency indistinguishable. Our circuit can supply a downstream solution to both problems, opening up a large window of allowed frequency mismatches between physical mechanisms. The only components used are spectrum analysers or prisms and an acousto-optic modulator. We also note that an acousto-optic modulator can be used to obtain Hong-Ou-Mandel two photon interference effects from the frequency distinguishable photons generated by distinct sources.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Mathematics, University of Bristol, University Walk, Bristol, BS8 1TW (United Kingdom)
  2. (United Kingdom)
  3. DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20786993
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. A; Journal Volume: 73; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.73.033813; (c) 2006 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; BEAM SPLITTING; INTERFERENCE; MATHEMATICAL SOLUTIONS; MODULATION; OPTICS; PHOTON BEAMS; PHOTONS; QUANTUM DOTS; QUANTUM ENTANGLEMENT

Citation Formats

Jones, Nick S., Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU, and Stace, T. M. Photon frequency-mode matching using acousto-optic frequency beam splitters. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0.
Jones, Nick S., Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU, & Stace, T. M. Photon frequency-mode matching using acousto-optic frequency beam splitters. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0.
Jones, Nick S., Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU, and Stace, T. M. Wed . "Photon frequency-mode matching using acousto-optic frequency beam splitters". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0.
@article{osti_20786993,
title = {Photon frequency-mode matching using acousto-optic frequency beam splitters},
author = {Jones, Nick S. and Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU and Stace, T. M.},
abstractNote = {It is a difficult engineering task to create distinct solid state single photon sources which nonetheless emit photons at the same frequency. It is also hard to create entangled photon pairs from quantum dots. In the spirit of quantum engineering we propose a simple optical circuit which can, in the right circumstances, make frequency distinguishable photons frequency indistinguishable. Our circuit can supply a downstream solution to both problems, opening up a large window of allowed frequency mismatches between physical mechanisms. The only components used are spectrum analysers or prisms and an acousto-optic modulator. We also note that an acousto-optic modulator can be used to obtain Hong-Ou-Mandel two photon interference effects from the frequency distinguishable photons generated by distinct sources.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0},
journal = {Physical Review. A},
number = 3,
volume = 73,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • We present an experiment testing quantum correlations with frequency shifted photons. We test Bell inequality with two-photon interferometry where we replace the beam splitters with acousto-optic modulators, which are equivalent to moving beam splitters. We measure the two-photon beats induced by the frequency shifts, and we propose a cryptographic scheme in relation. Finally, setting the experiment in a relativistic configuration, we demonstrate that the quantum correlations are not only independent of the distance but also of the time ordering between the two single-photon measurements.
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