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Title: Recurrence tracking microscope

Abstract

In order to probe nanostructures on a surface we present a microscope based on the quantum recurrence phenomena. A cloud of atoms bounces off an atomic mirror connected to a cantilever and exhibits quantum recurrences. The times at which the recurrences occur depend on the initial height of the bouncing atoms above the atomic mirror, and vary following the structures on the surface under investigation. The microscope has inherent advantages over existing techniques of scanning tunneling microscope and atomic force microscope. Presently available experimental technology makes it possible to develop the device in the laboratory.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Department of Electronics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320, Pakistan and Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20786976
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. A; Journal Volume: 73; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.73.033618; (c) 2006 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; ATOMS; MIRRORS; NANOSTRUCTURES; QUANTUM MECHANICS; SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY; SURFACES

Citation Formats

Saif, Farhan. Recurrence tracking microscope. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0.
Saif, Farhan. Recurrence tracking microscope. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0.
Saif, Farhan. Wed . "Recurrence tracking microscope". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0.
@article{osti_20786976,
title = {Recurrence tracking microscope},
author = {Saif, Farhan},
abstractNote = {In order to probe nanostructures on a surface we present a microscope based on the quantum recurrence phenomena. A cloud of atoms bounces off an atomic mirror connected to a cantilever and exhibits quantum recurrences. The times at which the recurrences occur depend on the initial height of the bouncing atoms above the atomic mirror, and vary following the structures on the surface under investigation. The microscope has inherent advantages over existing techniques of scanning tunneling microscope and atomic force microscope. Presently available experimental technology makes it possible to develop the device in the laboratory.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0},
journal = {Physical Review. A},
number = 3,
volume = 73,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}