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Title: Adaptive control of molecular alignment

Abstract

We demonstrate control on nonadiabatic molecular alignment by using a spectrally phase-shaped laser pulse. An evolutionary algorithm in a closed feedback loop has been used in order to find pulse shapes that maximize a given effect. In particular, this scheme has been applied to the optimization of total alignment, and to the control of the temporal structure of the alignment transient within a revival. Asymmetric temporal pulse shapes have been found to be very effective for the latter and have been studied separately in a single-parameter control scheme. Our experimental results are supported by numerical simulations.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. University of Kassel, Institute of Physics and Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology (CINSaT), Heinrich-Plett-Strasse 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany)
  2. (Spain)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20786829
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. A; Journal Volume: 73; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.73.031401; (c) 2006 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; ALGORITHMS; ASYMMETRY; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; CONTROL; LASER RADIATION; OPTICS; OPTIMIZATION; PHOTON-MOLECULE COLLISIONS; PULSES; ROTATIONAL STATES; TRANSIENTS

Citation Formats

Horn, C., Wollenhaupt, M., Krug, M., Baumert, T., Nalda, R. de, Banares, L., Instituto de Quimica Fisica Rocasolano, CSIC, C/Serrano, 119, 28006 Madrid, and Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid. Adaptive control of molecular alignment. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0.
Horn, C., Wollenhaupt, M., Krug, M., Baumert, T., Nalda, R. de, Banares, L., Instituto de Quimica Fisica Rocasolano, CSIC, C/Serrano, 119, 28006 Madrid, & Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid. Adaptive control of molecular alignment. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0.
Horn, C., Wollenhaupt, M., Krug, M., Baumert, T., Nalda, R. de, Banares, L., Instituto de Quimica Fisica Rocasolano, CSIC, C/Serrano, 119, 28006 Madrid, and Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid. Wed . "Adaptive control of molecular alignment". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0.
@article{osti_20786829,
title = {Adaptive control of molecular alignment},
author = {Horn, C. and Wollenhaupt, M. and Krug, M. and Baumert, T. and Nalda, R. de and Banares, L. and Instituto de Quimica Fisica Rocasolano, CSIC, C/Serrano, 119, 28006 Madrid and Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid},
abstractNote = {We demonstrate control on nonadiabatic molecular alignment by using a spectrally phase-shaped laser pulse. An evolutionary algorithm in a closed feedback loop has been used in order to find pulse shapes that maximize a given effect. In particular, this scheme has been applied to the optimization of total alignment, and to the control of the temporal structure of the alignment transient within a revival. Asymmetric temporal pulse shapes have been found to be very effective for the latter and have been studied separately in a single-parameter control scheme. Our experimental results are supported by numerical simulations.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0},
journal = {Physical Review. A},
number = 3,
volume = 73,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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