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Title: Crucial role of quantum entanglement in bulk properties of solids

Abstract

We demonstrate that two well-established experimental techniques of condensed-matter physics, neutron-diffraction scattering and measurement of magnetic susceptibility, can be used to detect and quantify macroscopic entanglement in solids. Specifically, magnetic susceptibility of copper nitrate (CN) measured in 1963 cannot be described without presence of entanglement. A detailed analysis of the spin correlations in CN as obtained from neutron-scattering experiment from 2000 provides microscopic support for this interpretation and gives the value for the amount of entanglement. We present a quantitative analysis resulting in the critical temperature of 5 K in both, completely independent, experiments below which entanglement exists.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [2];  [1];  [2]
  1. Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Wien, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)
  2. (Austria)
  3. (United Kingdom)
  4. School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20786642
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. A; Journal Volume: 73; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.73.012110; (c) 2006 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; COPPER NITRATES; CORRELATIONS; CRITICAL TEMPERATURE; MAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY; NEUTRON DIFFRACTION; QUANTUM ENTANGLEMENT; SOLIDS; SPIN

Citation Formats

Brukner, Caslav, Institut fuer Quantenoptik und Quanteninformation, Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Boltzmanngasse 3, A-1090 Vienna, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2BW, Vedral, Vlatko, Erwin Schroedinger Institute for Mathematical Physics, Boltzmanngasse 9, A-1090 Vienna, Zeilinger, Anton, and Institut fuer Quantenoptik und Quanteninformation, Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Boltzmanngasse 3, A-1090 Vienna. Crucial role of quantum entanglement in bulk properties of solids. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0.
Brukner, Caslav, Institut fuer Quantenoptik und Quanteninformation, Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Boltzmanngasse 3, A-1090 Vienna, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2BW, Vedral, Vlatko, Erwin Schroedinger Institute for Mathematical Physics, Boltzmanngasse 9, A-1090 Vienna, Zeilinger, Anton, & Institut fuer Quantenoptik und Quanteninformation, Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Boltzmanngasse 3, A-1090 Vienna. Crucial role of quantum entanglement in bulk properties of solids. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0.
Brukner, Caslav, Institut fuer Quantenoptik und Quanteninformation, Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Boltzmanngasse 3, A-1090 Vienna, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2BW, Vedral, Vlatko, Erwin Schroedinger Institute for Mathematical Physics, Boltzmanngasse 9, A-1090 Vienna, Zeilinger, Anton, and Institut fuer Quantenoptik und Quanteninformation, Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Boltzmanngasse 3, A-1090 Vienna. Sun . "Crucial role of quantum entanglement in bulk properties of solids". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0.
@article{osti_20786642,
title = {Crucial role of quantum entanglement in bulk properties of solids},
author = {Brukner, Caslav and Institut fuer Quantenoptik und Quanteninformation, Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Boltzmanngasse 3, A-1090 Vienna and Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2BW and Vedral, Vlatko and Erwin Schroedinger Institute for Mathematical Physics, Boltzmanngasse 9, A-1090 Vienna and Zeilinger, Anton and Institut fuer Quantenoptik und Quanteninformation, Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Boltzmanngasse 3, A-1090 Vienna},
abstractNote = {We demonstrate that two well-established experimental techniques of condensed-matter physics, neutron-diffraction scattering and measurement of magnetic susceptibility, can be used to detect and quantify macroscopic entanglement in solids. Specifically, magnetic susceptibility of copper nitrate (CN) measured in 1963 cannot be described without presence of entanglement. A detailed analysis of the spin correlations in CN as obtained from neutron-scattering experiment from 2000 provides microscopic support for this interpretation and gives the value for the amount of entanglement. We present a quantitative analysis resulting in the critical temperature of 5 K in both, completely independent, experiments below which entanglement exists.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.0},
journal = {Physical Review. A},
number = 1,
volume = 73,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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