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Title: Transport of atoms in a quantum conveyor belt

Abstract

We have performed experiments using a three-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate of sodium atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice to explore some unusual properties of band structure. In particular, we investigate the loading of a condensate into a moving lattice and find nonintuitive behavior. We also revisit the behavior of atoms, prepared in a single quasimomentum state, in an accelerating lattice. We generalize this study to a cloud whose atoms have a large quasimomentum spread, and show that the cloud behaves differently from atoms in a single Bloch state. Finally, we compare our findings with recent experiments performed with fermions in an optical lattice.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20786551
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. A; Journal Volume: 72; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.72.053605; (c) 2005 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; ATOMS; BOSE-EINSTEIN CONDENSATION; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; FERMIONS; OPTICS; QUANTUM MECHANICS; RADIATION PRESSURE; SODIUM

Citation Formats

Browaeys, A., Haeffner, H., McKenzie, C., Rolston, S. L., Helmerson, K., and Phillips, W. D.. Transport of atoms in a quantum conveyor belt. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.72.0.
Browaeys, A., Haeffner, H., McKenzie, C., Rolston, S. L., Helmerson, K., & Phillips, W. D.. Transport of atoms in a quantum conveyor belt. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.72.0.
Browaeys, A., Haeffner, H., McKenzie, C., Rolston, S. L., Helmerson, K., and Phillips, W. D.. Tue . "Transport of atoms in a quantum conveyor belt". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.72.0.
@article{osti_20786551,
title = {Transport of atoms in a quantum conveyor belt},
author = {Browaeys, A. and Haeffner, H. and McKenzie, C. and Rolston, S. L. and Helmerson, K. and Phillips, W. D.},
abstractNote = {We have performed experiments using a three-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate of sodium atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice to explore some unusual properties of band structure. In particular, we investigate the loading of a condensate into a moving lattice and find nonintuitive behavior. We also revisit the behavior of atoms, prepared in a single quasimomentum state, in an accelerating lattice. We generalize this study to a cloud whose atoms have a large quasimomentum spread, and show that the cloud behaves differently from atoms in a single Bloch state. Finally, we compare our findings with recent experiments performed with fermions in an optical lattice.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVA.72.0},
journal = {Physical Review. A},
number = 5,
volume = 72,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 15 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 15 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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