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Title: Excitation and charge transfer in p+H(2s) collisions

Abstract

Excitation and charge transfer cross sections for proton collisions with 2s excited state hydrogen are calculated using time-dependent lattice, atomic-orbital close-coupling with pseudostates, and classical trajectory Monte Carlo methods. The time-dependent lattice calculation yields {delta}n=1 excitation and {delta}n=0 and {delta}n=1 charge transfer cross sections at 5, 10, and 15 keV incident energy. The atomic-orbital close-coupling with pseudostates calculation yields excitation cross sections to n=3-5 and charge transfer cross sections to n=1-5 at a number of incident energies between 1 and 100 keV. The time-dependent lattice and close-coupling pseudostates calculations are found to be in good agreement with previous standard close-coupling results. The close-coupling with pseudostates calculations are used to benchmark the classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations, which are widely used in astrophysical and laboratory plasma modelling.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20786302
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. A; Journal Volume: 72; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.72.062703; (c) 2005 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; ATOMS; CATIONS; CHARGE EXCHANGE; COUPLING; CROSS SECTIONS; EXCITATION; EXCITED STATES; HYDROGEN; ION-ATOM COLLISIONS; KEV RANGE; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PLASMA; PROTONS; TIME DEPENDENCE

Citation Formats

Pindzola, M. S., Lee, T. G., Minami, T., Schultz, D. R., and Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831. Excitation and charge transfer in p+H(2s) collisions. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.72.0.
Pindzola, M. S., Lee, T. G., Minami, T., Schultz, D. R., & Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831. Excitation and charge transfer in p+H(2s) collisions. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.72.0.
Pindzola, M. S., Lee, T. G., Minami, T., Schultz, D. R., and Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831. Thu . "Excitation and charge transfer in p+H(2s) collisions". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.72.0.
@article{osti_20786302,
title = {Excitation and charge transfer in p+H(2s) collisions},
author = {Pindzola, M. S. and Lee, T. G. and Minami, T. and Schultz, D. R. and Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831},
abstractNote = {Excitation and charge transfer cross sections for proton collisions with 2s excited state hydrogen are calculated using time-dependent lattice, atomic-orbital close-coupling with pseudostates, and classical trajectory Monte Carlo methods. The time-dependent lattice calculation yields {delta}n=1 excitation and {delta}n=0 and {delta}n=1 charge transfer cross sections at 5, 10, and 15 keV incident energy. The atomic-orbital close-coupling with pseudostates calculation yields excitation cross sections to n=3-5 and charge transfer cross sections to n=1-5 at a number of incident energies between 1 and 100 keV. The time-dependent lattice and close-coupling pseudostates calculations are found to be in good agreement with previous standard close-coupling results. The close-coupling with pseudostates calculations are used to benchmark the classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations, which are widely used in astrophysical and laboratory plasma modelling.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVA.72.0},
journal = {Physical Review. A},
number = 6,
volume = 72,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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