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Title: Synthesis of nickel nanoparticles and carbon encapsulated nickel nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes

Abstract

Nickel nanoparticles were prepared and uniformly supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by reduction route with CNTs as a reducing agent at 600 deg. C. As-prepared nickel nanoparticles were single crystalline with a face-center-cubic phase and a size distribution ranging from 10 to 50 nm, and they were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD). These nickel nanoparticles would be coated with graphene layers, when they were exposed to acetylene at 600 deg. C. The coercivity values of nickel nanoparticles were superior to that of bulk nickel at room temperature.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China). E-mail: mseem@zju.edu.cn
  2. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)
  3. Department of Earth Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20784835
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Solid State Chemistry; Journal Volume: 179; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.jssc.2005.10.001; PII: S0022-4596(05)00459-7; Copyright (c) 2005 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; CARBON; LAYERS; MAGNETIC PROPERTIES; NANOTUBES; NICKEL; PARTICLES; SYNTHESIS; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Cheng Jipeng, Zhang Xiaobin, and Ye Ying. Synthesis of nickel nanoparticles and carbon encapsulated nickel nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jssc.2005.10.001.
Cheng Jipeng, Zhang Xiaobin, & Ye Ying. Synthesis of nickel nanoparticles and carbon encapsulated nickel nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jssc.2005.10.001.
Cheng Jipeng, Zhang Xiaobin, and Ye Ying. Sun . "Synthesis of nickel nanoparticles and carbon encapsulated nickel nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jssc.2005.10.001.
@article{osti_20784835,
title = {Synthesis of nickel nanoparticles and carbon encapsulated nickel nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes},
author = {Cheng Jipeng and Zhang Xiaobin and Ye Ying},
abstractNote = {Nickel nanoparticles were prepared and uniformly supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by reduction route with CNTs as a reducing agent at 600 deg. C. As-prepared nickel nanoparticles were single crystalline with a face-center-cubic phase and a size distribution ranging from 10 to 50 nm, and they were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD). These nickel nanoparticles would be coated with graphene layers, when they were exposed to acetylene at 600 deg. C. The coercivity values of nickel nanoparticles were superior to that of bulk nickel at room temperature.},
doi = {10.1016/j.jssc.2005.10.001},
journal = {Journal of Solid State Chemistry},
number = 1,
volume = 179,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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