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Title: Indole-3-carbinol, but not its major digestive product 3,3'-diindolylmethane, induces reversible hepatocyte hypertrophy and cytochromes P450

Abstract

Indole-3-carbinol (I-3-C) and 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM) have been shown to reduce the incidence and multiplicity of cancers in laboratory animal models. Based on the observation that I-3-C induced hepatocyte hypertrophy when administered orally for 13 weeks to rats, a treatment and recovery study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that the induction of hepatocyte hypertrophy and cytochrome P450 (CYP) activity by I-3-C are adaptive, reversible responses. Additionally, we directly compared the effects of I-3-C to those of its principle metabolite DIM. Rats were treated orally for 28 days with 2 doses of I-3-C (5 and 50 mg I-3-C/kg body weight/day) and DIM (7.5 and 75 mg DIM/kg body weight/day) and then one-half of the animals were not treated for an additional 28 days. Organ weights, histopathology, and the CYP enzyme activities of 1A1/2, 2B1/2, 2C9, 2D6, 2E1, 3A4, and 19 A were measured both after treatment and after recovery. Oral administration of 50 mg I-3-C/kg body weight/day to rats for 28 days significantly increased liver weights and CYP enzyme activities. The effects in males were more pronounced and persistent after recovery than the effects in females. The increased organ weights returned to control values after treatment. Conversely, DIM did not altermore » liver weights and had no effect on CYP activities after the 28-day treatment. Some changes in CYP activities were measured after the DIM recovery period but the magnitudes of the changes were considered biologically insignificant. The results show that I-3-C, but not DIM, induces reversible adaptive responses in the liver.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [2]
  1. Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, 6130 Executive Blvd., MSC 7322 Bldg. EPN, Rm 2118, Bethesda, MD 20892-7322 (United States). E-mail: jc94h@nih.gov
  2. Southern Research Institute, Birmingham, AL 35205 (United States)
  3. Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)
  4. Pathology Associates Inc., Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20783435
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology; Journal Volume: 211; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.taap.2005.06.011; PII: S0041-008X(05)00376-5; Copyright (c) 2005 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; CYTOCHROMES; ENZYME ACTIVITY; HYPERTROPHY; INDOLES; LABORATORY ANIMALS; LIVER; METHANOL; MULTIPLICITY; NEOPLASMS; RATS

Citation Formats

Crowell, James A., Page, John G., Levine, Barry S., Tomlinson, Michael J., and Hebert, Charles D.. Indole-3-carbinol, but not its major digestive product 3,3'-diindolylmethane, induces reversible hepatocyte hypertrophy and cytochromes P450. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2005.06.011.
Crowell, James A., Page, John G., Levine, Barry S., Tomlinson, Michael J., & Hebert, Charles D.. Indole-3-carbinol, but not its major digestive product 3,3'-diindolylmethane, induces reversible hepatocyte hypertrophy and cytochromes P450. United States. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2005.06.011.
Crowell, James A., Page, John G., Levine, Barry S., Tomlinson, Michael J., and Hebert, Charles D.. Wed . "Indole-3-carbinol, but not its major digestive product 3,3'-diindolylmethane, induces reversible hepatocyte hypertrophy and cytochromes P450". United States. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2005.06.011.
@article{osti_20783435,
title = {Indole-3-carbinol, but not its major digestive product 3,3'-diindolylmethane, induces reversible hepatocyte hypertrophy and cytochromes P450},
author = {Crowell, James A. and Page, John G. and Levine, Barry S. and Tomlinson, Michael J. and Hebert, Charles D.},
abstractNote = {Indole-3-carbinol (I-3-C) and 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM) have been shown to reduce the incidence and multiplicity of cancers in laboratory animal models. Based on the observation that I-3-C induced hepatocyte hypertrophy when administered orally for 13 weeks to rats, a treatment and recovery study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that the induction of hepatocyte hypertrophy and cytochrome P450 (CYP) activity by I-3-C are adaptive, reversible responses. Additionally, we directly compared the effects of I-3-C to those of its principle metabolite DIM. Rats were treated orally for 28 days with 2 doses of I-3-C (5 and 50 mg I-3-C/kg body weight/day) and DIM (7.5 and 75 mg DIM/kg body weight/day) and then one-half of the animals were not treated for an additional 28 days. Organ weights, histopathology, and the CYP enzyme activities of 1A1/2, 2B1/2, 2C9, 2D6, 2E1, 3A4, and 19 A were measured both after treatment and after recovery. Oral administration of 50 mg I-3-C/kg body weight/day to rats for 28 days significantly increased liver weights and CYP enzyme activities. The effects in males were more pronounced and persistent after recovery than the effects in females. The increased organ weights returned to control values after treatment. Conversely, DIM did not alter liver weights and had no effect on CYP activities after the 28-day treatment. Some changes in CYP activities were measured after the DIM recovery period but the magnitudes of the changes were considered biologically insignificant. The results show that I-3-C, but not DIM, induces reversible adaptive responses in the liver.},
doi = {10.1016/j.taap.2005.06.011},
journal = {Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology},
number = 2,
volume = 211,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Increased consumption of cruciferous vegetables is associated with a reduced risk of developing prostate cancer. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM) are phytochemicals derived from cruciferous vegetables that have shown promise in inhibiting prostate cancer in experimental models. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition is an emerging target for cancer prevention and therapy. We sought to examine the effects of I3C and DIM on HDACs in human prostate cancer cell lines: androgen insensitive PC-3 cells and androgen sensitive LNCaP cells. I3C modestly inhibited HDAC activity in LNCaP cells by 25% but no inhibition of HDAC activity was detected in PC-3 cells. In contrast,more » DIM significantly inhibited HDAC activity in both cell lines by as much as 66%. Decreases in HDAC activity correlated with increased expression of p21, a known target of HDAC inhibitors. DIM treatment caused a significant decrease in the expression of HDAC2 protein in both cancer cell lines but no significant change in the protein levels of HDAC1, HDAC3, HDAC4, HDAC6 or HDAC8 was detected. Taken together, these results show that inhibition of HDAC activity by DIM may contribute to the phytochemicals' anti-proliferative effects in the prostate. The ability of DIM to target aberrant epigenetic patterns, in addition to its effects on detoxification of carcinogens, may make it an effective chemopreventive agent by targeting multiple stages of prostate carcinogenesis. -- Highlights: ► DIM inhibits HDAC activity and decreases HDAC2 expression in prostate cancer cells. ► DIM is significantly more effective than I3C at inhibiting HDAC activity. ► I3C has no effect on HDAC protein expression. ► Inhibition of HDAC activity by DIM is associated with increased p21 expression. ► HDAC inhibition may be a novel epigenetic mechanism for cancer prevention with DIM.« less
  • Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) is a potent exotoxin produced by the Staphylococcus aureus. This toxin is classified as a superantigen because of its ability to directly bind with MHC-II class molecules followed by activation of a large proportion of T cells bearing specific Vβ-T cell receptors. Commonly associated with classic food poisoning, SEB has also been shown to induce toxic shock syndrome, and is also considered to be a potential biological warfare agent because it is easily aerosolized. In the present study, we assessed the ability of indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and one of its byproducts, 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM), found in cruciferous vegetables,more » to counteract the effects of SEB-induced activation of T cells in mice. Both I3C and DIM were found to decrease the activation, proliferation, and cytokine production by SEB-activated Vβ8{sup +} T cells in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, inhibitors of histone deacetylase class I (HDAC-I), but not class II (HDAC-II), showed significant decrease in SEB-induced T cell activation and cytokine production, thereby suggesting that epigenetic modulation plays a critical role in the regulation of SEB-induced inflammation. In addition, I3C and DIM caused a decrease in HDAC-I but not HDAC-II in SEB-activated T cells, thereby suggesting that I3C and DIM may inhibit SEB-mediated T cell activation by acting as HDAC-I inhibitors. These studies not only suggest for the first time that plant-derived indoles are potent suppressors of SEB-induced T cell activation and cytokine storm but also that they may mediate these effects by acting as HDAC inhibitors. - Highlights: • I3C and DIM reduce SEB-induced T cell activation and inflammatory cytokines. • Inhibiting class I HDACs reduces T cell activation and inflammatory cytokines. • Inhibiting class II HDACs increases T cell activation and inflammatory cytokines. • I3C and DIM selectively reduce mRNA expression of class I HDACs. • Novel use and mechanism to counteract SEB with I3C and DIM.« less
  • Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) is a secondary plant metabolite produced in vegetables of the Brassica genus, including cabbage, cauliflower, and brussels sprouts. I3C is both an anti-initiator and a promoter of carcinogenesis. Consumption of I3C by humans and rodents can lead to marked increases in activities of cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenases and in a variety of phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes. The authors have reported previously that the enzyme-inducing activity of I3C is mediated through a mechanism requiring exposure of the compound to the low-pH environment of the stomach. They report here the aromatic hydrocarbon responsiveness-receptor K{sub d} values (22 nM-90 nM), determined withmore » C57BL/6J mouse liver cytosol and the in vitro- and in vivo-molar yields of the major acid condensation products of I3C. They also show that indolo (3,2-b)carbazole (ICZ) is produced form I3C in yields on the order of 0.01% in vitro and, after oral intubation, in vivo. ICZ has a K{sub d} of 190 pM for aromatic hydrocarbon responsiveness-receptor binding and an EC{sub 50} of 269 nM for induction of cytochrome P4501A1, as measured by ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells. The binding affinity of ICZ is only a factor of 3.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} lower than that of the highly toxic environmental contaminant and cancer promoter 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin. ICZ and related condensation products appear responsible for the enzyme-inducing effects of dietary I3C.« less
  • Resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs is one of the major problems in the treatment of cancer. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) encoded by the mdr gene is a highly conserved protein, acts as a multidrug transporter, and has a major role in multiple drug resistance (MDR). Targeting of P-gp by naturally occurring compounds is an effective strategy to overcome MDR. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a glucosinolates present in cruciferous vegetables, is a promising chemopreventive agent as it is reported to possess antimutagenic, antitumorigenic, and antiestrogenic properties in experimental studies. In the present investigation, the potential of I3C to modulate P-gp expression was evaluated in vinblastine (VBL)-resistantmore » K562 human leukemic cells. The resistant K562 cells (K562/R10) were found to be cross-resistant to vincristine (VCR), doxorubicin (DXR), and other antineoplastic agents. I3C at a nontoxic dose (10 x 10{sup -3} M) enhanced the cytotoxic effects of VBL time dependently in VBL-resistant human leukemia (K562/R10) cells but had no effect on parent-sensitive cells (K562/S). The Western blot analysis of K 562/R 10 cells showed that I3C downregulates the induced levels of P-gp in resistant cells near to normal levels. The quantitation of immunocytochemically stained K562/R10 cells showed 24%, 48%, and 80% decrease in the levels of P-gp by I3C for 24, 48, and 72 h of incubation. The above features thus indicate that I3C could be used as a novel modulator of P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance in vitro and may be effective as a dietary adjuvant in the treatment of MDR cancers.« less
  • Cruciferous vegetable components have been documented to exhibit anticancer properties. Targets of action span multiple mechanisms deregulated during cancer progression, ranging from altered carcinogen metabolism to the restoration of epigenetic machinery. Furthermore, the developing fetus is highly susceptible to changes in nutritional status and to environmental toxicants. Thus, we have exploited a mouse model of transplacental carcinogenesis to assess the impact of maternal dietary supplementation on cancer risk in offspring. In this study, transplacental and lactational exposure to a maternal dose of 15 mg/Kg B.W. of dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC) resulted in significant morbidity of offspring due to an aggressive T-cell lymphoblasticmore » lymphoma. As in previous studies, indole-3-carbinol (I3C, feed to the dam at 100, 500 or 1000 ppm), derived from cruciferous vegetables, dose-dependently reduced lung tumor multiplicity and also increased offspring survival. Brussels sprout and broccoli sprout powders, selected for their relative abundance of I3C and the bioactive component sulforaphane (SFN), respectively, surprisingly enhanced DBC-induced morbidity and tumorigenesis when incorporated into the maternal diet at 10% wt/wt. Purified SFN, incorporated in the maternal diet at 400 ppm, also decreased the latency of DBC-dependent morbidity. Interestingly, I3C abrogated the effect of SFN when the two purified compounds were administered in equimolar combination (500 ppm I3C and 600 ppm SFN). SFN metabolites measured in the plasma of neonates positively correlated with exposure levels via the maternal diet but not with offspring mortality. These findings provide justification for further study of the safety and bioactivity of cruciferous vegetable phytochemicals at supplemental concentrations during the perinatal period. - Highlights: • Dietary supplementation may modulate cancer risk in a mouse model of lymphoma. • Cruciferous vegetables may not contain sufficient I3C for transplacental protection. • SFN is abundant in cruciferous vegetables and may enhance risk in this model. • SFN and its mercapturic acid metabolites were measurable in neonatal plasma.« less