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Title: Enhancement of esculetin on Taxol-induced apoptosis in human hepatoma HepG2 cells

Abstract

The potential use of low dose chemotherapy has been appealing since lower dosages are more attainable during cancer therapy and cause less toxicity in patients. Combination therapy of Taxol, a promising frontline chemotherapy agent, with natural anti-tumor agents that are considerably less toxic with a capability of activating additional apoptotic signals or inhibiting survival signals may provide a rational molecular basis for novel chemotherapeutic strategies. Esculetin, a well-known lipoxygenase inhibitor, showed an inhibitory effect on the cell cycle progression of HL-60 cells in our previous study. In this report, the effects of a concomitant administration of esculetin and Taxol were investigated in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Firstly, esculetin alone could exert an antiproliferation effect together with an inhibitory effect on the activation of ERKs and p38 MAPK. As compared to the treatment with Taxol only, a co-administration with esculetin and Taxol could result in a further enhancement of apoptosis as revealed by DNA fragmentation assay and Annexin-V-based assay. Meanwhile, immunoblotting analysis also showed that the co-administration of esculetin and Taxol could increase the expression of Bax and the cytosolic release of cytochrome C and enhance the expression of Fas and Fas ligand while the activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 wasmore » also increased. Finally, the ERK cascade was proven to be involved in the enhancement of esculetin on the Taxol-induced apoptosis.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3]
  1. Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Chien Kuo N. Road, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China)
  2. School of Applied Chemistry, Chung Shan Medical University, No. 110, Section 1, Chien Kuo N. Road, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China)
  3. School of Applied Chemistry, Chung Shan Medical University, No. 110, Section 1, Chien Kuo N. Road, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China). E-mail: tht@csmu.edu.tw
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20783400
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology; Journal Volume: 210; Journal Issue: 1-2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.taap.2005.06.020; PII: S0041-008X(05)00385-6; Copyright (c) 2005 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; APOPTOSIS; CELL CYCLE; CHEMOTHERAPY; DMSO; DNA; HEPATOMAS; LIGANDS; PATIENTS; PROTEINS; TOXICITY

Citation Formats

Kuo, H.-C., Lee, H.-J., Hu, C.-C., Shun, H.-I, and Tseng, T.-H.. Enhancement of esculetin on Taxol-induced apoptosis in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2005.06.020.
Kuo, H.-C., Lee, H.-J., Hu, C.-C., Shun, H.-I, & Tseng, T.-H.. Enhancement of esculetin on Taxol-induced apoptosis in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. United States. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2005.06.020.
Kuo, H.-C., Lee, H.-J., Hu, C.-C., Shun, H.-I, and Tseng, T.-H.. Sun . "Enhancement of esculetin on Taxol-induced apoptosis in human hepatoma HepG2 cells". United States. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2005.06.020.
@article{osti_20783400,
title = {Enhancement of esculetin on Taxol-induced apoptosis in human hepatoma HepG2 cells},
author = {Kuo, H.-C. and Lee, H.-J. and Hu, C.-C. and Shun, H.-I and Tseng, T.-H.},
abstractNote = {The potential use of low dose chemotherapy has been appealing since lower dosages are more attainable during cancer therapy and cause less toxicity in patients. Combination therapy of Taxol, a promising frontline chemotherapy agent, with natural anti-tumor agents that are considerably less toxic with a capability of activating additional apoptotic signals or inhibiting survival signals may provide a rational molecular basis for novel chemotherapeutic strategies. Esculetin, a well-known lipoxygenase inhibitor, showed an inhibitory effect on the cell cycle progression of HL-60 cells in our previous study. In this report, the effects of a concomitant administration of esculetin and Taxol were investigated in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Firstly, esculetin alone could exert an antiproliferation effect together with an inhibitory effect on the activation of ERKs and p38 MAPK. As compared to the treatment with Taxol only, a co-administration with esculetin and Taxol could result in a further enhancement of apoptosis as revealed by DNA fragmentation assay and Annexin-V-based assay. Meanwhile, immunoblotting analysis also showed that the co-administration of esculetin and Taxol could increase the expression of Bax and the cytosolic release of cytochrome C and enhance the expression of Fas and Fas ligand while the activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 was also increased. Finally, the ERK cascade was proven to be involved in the enhancement of esculetin on the Taxol-induced apoptosis.},
doi = {10.1016/j.taap.2005.06.020},
journal = {Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology},
number = 1-2,
volume = 210,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Since hepatocellular carcinoma remains a major challenging clinical problem in many parts of the world including Eastern Asia and Southern Africa, it is imperative to develop more effective chemopreventive and chemotherapy agents. Herein, we present an investigation regarding the anticancer potential of luteolin, a natural flavonoid, and the mechanism of its action in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Using DNA fragmentation assay and nuclear staining assay, it showed that luteolin induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells. Luteolin induced the cytosolic release of cytochrome c and activated CPP32. We found that Bax and Bak translocated to mitochondria apparently, whereas Fas ligand (FasL) wasmore » unchanged after a treatment with luteolin for 3 h. In addition, it showed that c-Jun NH{sub 2}-terminal kinase (JNK) was activated after the treatment of luteolin for 3-12 h. Further investigation showed that a specific JNK inhibitor, SP600125, reduced the activation of CPP 32, the mitochondrial translocation of Bax, as well as the cytosolic release of cytochrome c that induced by luteolin. Finally, the apoptosis induced by luteolin was suppressed by a pretreatment with SP600125 via evaluating annexin V-FITC binding assay. These data suggest that luteolin induced apoptosis via mechanisms involving mitochondria translocation of Bax/Bak and activation of JNK.« less
  • Esculetin (6,7-dihydroxy coumarin), is a potent antioxidant that is present in several plant species. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of protection of esculetin in human hepatoma HepG2 cells against reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by hydrogen peroxide. Cell viability, cell integrity, intracellular glutathione levels, generation of reactive oxygen species and expression of antioxidant enzymes were used as markers to measure cellular oxidative stress and response to ROS. The protective effect of esculetin was compared to a well-characterized chemoprotective compound quercetin. Pre-treatment of HepG2 cells with sub-lethal (10-25 {mu}M) esculetin for 8 h prevented cell deathmore » and maintained cell integrity following exposure to 0.9 mM hydrogen peroxide. An increase in the generation of ROS following hydrogen peroxide treatment was significantly attenuated by 8 h pre-treatment with esculetin. In addition, esculetin ameliorated the decrease in intracellular glutathione caused by hydrogen peroxide exposure. Moreover, treatment with 25 {mu}M esculetin for 8 h increased the expression of NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) at both protein and mRNA levels significantly, by 12-fold and 15-fold, respectively. Esculetin treatment also increased nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 by 8-fold indicating that increased NQO1 expression is Nrf2-mediated. These results indicate that esculetin protects human hepatoma HepG2 cells from hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative injury and that this protection is provided through the induction of protective enzymes as part of an adaptive response mediated by Nrf2 nuclear accumulation.« less
  • Human aquaporin-8 (AQP8) channels facilitate the diffusional transport of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} across membranes. Since AQP8 is expressed in hepatic inner mitochondrial membranes, we studied whether mitochondrial AQP8 (mtAQP8) knockdown in human hepatoma HepG2 cells impairs mitochondrial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} release, which may lead to organelle dysfunction and cell death. We confirmed AQP8 expression in HepG2 inner mitochondrial membranes and found that 72 h after cell transfection with siRNAs targeting two different regions of the human AQP8 molecule, mtAQP8 protein specifically decreased by around 60% (p < 0.05). Studies in isolated mtAQP8-knockdown mitochondria showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} release, assessedmore » by Amplex Red, was reduced by about 45% (p < 0.05), an effect not observed in digitonin-permeabilized mitochondria. mtAQP8-knockdown cells showed an increase in mitochondrial ROS, assessed by dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (+ 120%, p < 0.05) and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (− 80%, p < 0.05), assessed by tetramethylrhodamine-coupled quantitative fluorescence microscopy. The mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoTempol prevented ROS accumulation and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential. Cyclosporin A, a mitochondrial permeability transition pore blocker, also abolished the mtAQP8 knockdown-induced mitochondrial depolarization. Besides, the loss of viability in mtAQP8 knockdown cells verified by MTT assay, LDH leakage, and trypan blue exclusion test could be prevented by cyclosporin A. Our data on human hepatoma HepG2 cells suggest that mtAQP8 facilitates mitochondrial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} release and that its defective expression causes ROS-induced mitochondrial depolarization via the mitochondrial permeability transition mechanism, and cell death. -- Highlights: ► Aquaporin-8 is expressed in mitochondria of human hepatoma HepG2 cells. ► Aquaporin-8 knockdown impairs mitochondrial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} release and increases ROS. ► Aquaporin-8 knockdown causes ROS-induced mitochondrial depolarization and cell death. ► Mitochondrial permeability transition blockage prevents depolarization and cell death.« less
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  • The binding, internalization, processing and release of labeled cyanocobalamin (CN(57Co)Cbl) bound to human transcobalamin II (TC II) were studied in HepG2 cells, a line of hepatocytes derived from a human hepatoma. The cells bound the TC II-Cbl by specific, high affinity receptors. Within the cell, the CN-Cbl was promptly freed from TC II and the CN-Cbl converted to more active forms including adenosyl Cbl (AdoCbl) and methyl Cbl (MeCbl). Whereas free labeled Cbl was still present at 72 hours after entry, the cells also bound Cbl to an intracellular binder (ICB) presumed to represent the holo enzymes dependent on Cbl.more » At levels of TC II that saturated the receptors for TC II-Cbl, much of the Cbl entering the cells remained free and was converted to AdoCbl. Under these circumstances the cells released free Cbl, mostly AdoCbl. Human R type binders of Cbl, which are glycoproteins and some having a terminal galactose, were bound by the HepG2 cells. Cbl bound to R binder was internalized and converted to coenzyme forms of Cbl, but the process was much less effective than when the Cbl entered via the TC II receptor system. It was concluded that the receptors for R-Cbl were unlikely to contribute to the physiologic transport of Cbl in man, but may function in some yet unknown way.« less