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Title: Upregulation of estrogen receptor expression in the uterus of ovariectomized B6C3F1 mice and Ishikawa cells treated with bromoethane

Abstract

In a 2-year NTP bioassay, Bromoethane (BE) was found to induce endometrial neoplasms in the uterus of B6C3F1 mice [; ]. In women, hormonal influences, such as 'unopposed' estrogenic stimulus, have been implicated as important etiologic factors in uterine cancer. BE, however, does not affect the serum concentrations of sex hormones in female B6C3F1 mice [] and the mechanism of BE-induced uterine carcinogenesis still remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the estrogenic effects of BE on the uterus of ovariectomized B6C3F1 mice and on Ishikawa cells. Groups of 6 mice were given daily s.c. injections of 0, 100, 500 or 1000 mg BE/kg for 3 consecutive days. Mice treated with 17{beta}-estradiol served as positive controls. Mice were necropsied 24 h after the final injection, and uteri were weighed and examined histologically and immunohistochemically along with the vagina. Changes observed in the estrogen-treated mice included increased uterine weights, edema and inflammation of the endometrium, increased epithelial layers of the uterine and vaginal lumens and keratinization of the vaginal epithelium. In the BE-treated mice, no such changes occurred; however, immunohistochemical staining of the uterus revealed a significant increase in immunoexpression of the estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}) in the two highermore » dose groups. Analysis of mRNA also showed slightly increased uterine ER{alpha} expression in these groups. Upregulated expression of ER{alpha} was confirmed in BE-treated Ishikawa cells, in which Western blotting analyses identified an intense signal at approximately 66 kDa, which is consistent with ER{alpha}. These data suggest that upregulated expression of ER{alpha} may be important in the induction of endometrial neoplasms in BE-treated mice.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [4]
  1. Laboratory of Experimental Pathology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD C2-09, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)
  2. Laboratory of Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)
  3. Biostatistics Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)
  4. Laboratory of Experimental Pathology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD C2-09, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States). E-mail: dixon@niehs.nih.gov
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20783386
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology; Journal Volume: 209; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.taap.2005.04.012; PII: S0041-008X(05)00173-0; Copyright (c) 2005 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BIOASSAY; CARCINOGENESIS; EDEMA; EPITHELIUM; ESTRADIOL; INFLAMMATION; INJECTION; MICE; NEOPLASMS; RECEPTORS; UTERUS

Citation Formats

Aoyama, Hiroaki, Couse, John F., Hewitt, Sylvia C., Haseman, Joseph K., He, Hong, Zheng, Xiaolin, Majstoravich, Sonja, Korach, Kenneth S., and Dixon, D. Upregulation of estrogen receptor expression in the uterus of ovariectomized B6C3F1 mice and Ishikawa cells treated with bromoethane. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2005.04.012.
Aoyama, Hiroaki, Couse, John F., Hewitt, Sylvia C., Haseman, Joseph K., He, Hong, Zheng, Xiaolin, Majstoravich, Sonja, Korach, Kenneth S., & Dixon, D. Upregulation of estrogen receptor expression in the uterus of ovariectomized B6C3F1 mice and Ishikawa cells treated with bromoethane. United States. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2005.04.012.
Aoyama, Hiroaki, Couse, John F., Hewitt, Sylvia C., Haseman, Joseph K., He, Hong, Zheng, Xiaolin, Majstoravich, Sonja, Korach, Kenneth S., and Dixon, D. Thu . "Upregulation of estrogen receptor expression in the uterus of ovariectomized B6C3F1 mice and Ishikawa cells treated with bromoethane". United States. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2005.04.012.
@article{osti_20783386,
title = {Upregulation of estrogen receptor expression in the uterus of ovariectomized B6C3F1 mice and Ishikawa cells treated with bromoethane},
author = {Aoyama, Hiroaki and Couse, John F. and Hewitt, Sylvia C. and Haseman, Joseph K. and He, Hong and Zheng, Xiaolin and Majstoravich, Sonja and Korach, Kenneth S. and Dixon, D.},
abstractNote = {In a 2-year NTP bioassay, Bromoethane (BE) was found to induce endometrial neoplasms in the uterus of B6C3F1 mice [; ]. In women, hormonal influences, such as 'unopposed' estrogenic stimulus, have been implicated as important etiologic factors in uterine cancer. BE, however, does not affect the serum concentrations of sex hormones in female B6C3F1 mice [] and the mechanism of BE-induced uterine carcinogenesis still remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the estrogenic effects of BE on the uterus of ovariectomized B6C3F1 mice and on Ishikawa cells. Groups of 6 mice were given daily s.c. injections of 0, 100, 500 or 1000 mg BE/kg for 3 consecutive days. Mice treated with 17{beta}-estradiol served as positive controls. Mice were necropsied 24 h after the final injection, and uteri were weighed and examined histologically and immunohistochemically along with the vagina. Changes observed in the estrogen-treated mice included increased uterine weights, edema and inflammation of the endometrium, increased epithelial layers of the uterine and vaginal lumens and keratinization of the vaginal epithelium. In the BE-treated mice, no such changes occurred; however, immunohistochemical staining of the uterus revealed a significant increase in immunoexpression of the estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}) in the two higher dose groups. Analysis of mRNA also showed slightly increased uterine ER{alpha} expression in these groups. Upregulated expression of ER{alpha} was confirmed in BE-treated Ishikawa cells, in which Western blotting analyses identified an intense signal at approximately 66 kDa, which is consistent with ER{alpha}. These data suggest that upregulated expression of ER{alpha} may be important in the induction of endometrial neoplasms in BE-treated mice.},
doi = {10.1016/j.taap.2005.04.012},
journal = {Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology},
number = 3,
volume = 209,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
  • Several anthropogenous and naturally occurring substances, referred to as estrogen active compounds (EACs), are able to interfere with hormone and in particular estrogen receptor signaling. EACs can either cause adverse health effects in humans and wildlife populations or have beneficial effects on estrogen-dependent diseases. The aim of this study was to examine global gene expression profiles in estrogen receptor (ER)-proficient Ishikawa plus and ER-deficient Ishikawa minus endometrial cancer cells treated with selected well-known EACs (Diethylstilbestrol, Genistein, Zearalenone, Resveratrol, Bisphenol A and o,p'-DDT). We also investigated the effect of the pure antiestrogen ICI 182,780 (ICI) on the expression patterns caused bymore » these compounds. Transcript levels were quantified 24 h after compound treatment using Illumina BeadChip Arrays. We identified 87 genes with similar expression changes in response to all EAC treatments in Ishikawa plus. ICI lowered the magnitude or reversed the expression of these genes, indicating ER dependent regulation. Apart from estrogenic gene regulation, Bisphenol A, o,p'-DDT, Zearalenone, Genistein and Resveratrol displayed similarities to ICI in their expression patterns, suggesting mixed estrogenic/antiestrogenic properties. In particular, the predominant antiestrogenic expression response of Resveratrol could be clearly distinguished from the other test compounds, indicating a distinct mechanism of action. Divergent gene expression patterns of the phytoestrogens, as well as weaker estrogenic gene expression regulation determined for the anthropogenous chemicals Bisphenol A and o,p'-DDT, warrants a careful assessment of potential detrimental and/or beneficial effects of EACs. The characteristic expression fingerprints and the identified subset of putative marker genes can be used for screening chemicals with an unknown mode of action and for predicting their potential to exert endocrine disrupting effects.« less
  • Previously, we have reported that thalidomide (Thd) can enhance neutrophil function in female B6C3F1 mice. The present study was intended to evaluate the mechanisms underlying the enhanced neutrophil responses following Thd treatment intraperitoneally (100 mg/kg) for 14 or 28 days. Treatment with Thd increased the numbers of neutrophils in the spleen, peripheral blood, bone marrow, peritoneal cavity and lungs of female B6C3F1 mice when compared to the vehicle control mice. Thd treatment for 14 days increased the percentage and the number of neutrophils in the spleen in the first 8 h (peaking at 2 h) after the last Thd treatment,more » and it returned to the baseline after 24 h. However, Thd treatment for 28 days increased the percentage and number of neutrophils in the spleen even at the 24-h time point after the last Thd treatment. These neutrophils were demonstrated to be functional by the myeloperoxidase activity assay. Further studies have ruled out the possibility of an increased bone marrow granulopoiesis following Thd treatment. Flow cytometric analysis of the surface expression of adhesion molecules suggested that Thd treatment for either 14 or 28 days decreased the surface expression of either CD18 or CD44 by bone marrow neutrophils. On the other hand, the surface expression of both CD18 and CD44 by splenic neutrophils was increased following Thd treatment for 28 days but not for 14 days. No effect was produced for other cell surface molecules such as CD62L and CD11a. It was possible that decreased surface expressions of CD18 and CD44 facilitated neutrophils' release from the bone marrow; increased surface expressions of CD44 and CD18 by splenic neutrophils after 28 days of Thd treatment increased their ability to remain in the periphery. Taken together, Thd treatment increased neutrophils in female B6C3F1 mice, at least partially, through differentially modulating the surface expression of CD18 and CD44 by the neutrophils in the bone marrow and spleen00.« less
  • This study focuses on the characterization of expression modulation of two critical growth regulatory genes, estrogen receptor and epidermal growth factor-receptor, in malignant mammary epithelial cells in response to single and repeated ionizing radiation exposures. MCF-7 cells were used for single radiation exposure (2-50 Gy) experiments and MCF-IR-3 cells, generated by exposure to cumulative doses of 60 Gy in 2 Gy fractions, respectively, were used to study the effects of repeated exposures. Steady-state messenger ribonucleic acid levels for estrogen receptor, epidermal growth factor-receptor, and transforming growth factor-{alpha} were determined by ribonucleic acid protection experiments. Estrogen receptor and epidermal growth factor-receptormore » protein expression was quantitated by competitive binding studies with {sup 3}H-estradiol and {sup 125}I-EGF. MCF-IR-3 cells showed a permanent three-fold down-regulation of the estrogen receptor messenger ribonucleic acid and protein, while epidermal growth factor-receptor was upregulated about nine-fold. Epidermal growth factor-receptor was substantially up-regulated in MCF-7 cells, at both the mRNA and protein levels, within 24 h of a single 2 Gy exposures, while there was a two-fold concomitant increase in transforming growth factor-{alpha} messenger ribonucleic acid expression. A decrease in estrogen receptor messenger ribonucleic acid and protein was suggested only after higher doses of single radiation exposures. The inverse expression of estrogen receptor and epidermal growth factor-receptor established for estrogen receptor-positive malignant mammary epithelial cells is maintained in MCF-7 cells after single and repeated exposures, suggesting that radiation acts through common regulatory circuits and may modulate the cellular phenotype. 40 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.« less
  • Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditional transgenic mice expressing constitutively active estrogen receptor {alpha} (caER{alpha}) in chondrocytes were developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of caER{alpha} in chondrocytes impaired longitudinal bone growth in mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer caER{alpha} affects chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This mouse model is useful for understanding the physiological role of ER{alpha}in vivo. -- Abstract: Estrogen plays important roles in the regulation of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, which are essential steps for longitudinal bone growth; however, the mechanisms of estrogen action on chondrocytes have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we generated conditional transgenic mice, designated as caER{alpha}{sup ColII}, expressing constitutively activemore » mutant estrogen receptor (ER) {alpha} in chondrocytes, using the chondrocyte-specific type II collagen promoter-driven Cre transgenic mice. caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice showed retardation in longitudinal growth, with short bone lengths. BrdU labeling showed reduced proliferation of hypertrophic chondrocytes in the proliferating layer of the growth plate of tibia in caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice. In situ hybridization analysis of type X collagen revealed that the maturation of hypertrophic chondrocytes was impaired in caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice. These results suggest that ER{alpha} is a critical regulator of chondrocyte proliferation and maturation during skeletal development, mediating longitudinal bone growth in vivo.« less
  • No abstract prepared.