skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: EIA scoping in England and Wales: Practitioner approaches, perspectives and constraints

Abstract

Scoping plays a critical role in shaping the nature and extent of the environmental information subsequently contained in an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), yet it has been identified as an area of weakness in practice () and remains a poorly understood and under-researched component of EIA. This paper provides a detailed empirical investigation and assessment of recent scoping activity in England and Wales, in the context of evolving European Union (EU) regulations. Conceptual and contextual issues associated with scoping are outlined prior to the presentation of key findings, including: approaches to scoping; the assessment of significance; characteristics and influence of consultation; and perceived constraints to scoping. The paper concludes with an overview of findings, possible explanatory factors, and recommendations for future practice.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Impacts Assessment Unit, Department of Planning, School of the Built Environment, Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane, Oxford OX3 0BP (United Kingdom). E-mail: gjwood@brookes.ac.uk
  2. Impacts Assessment Unit, Department of Planning, School of the Built Environment, Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane, Oxford OX3 0BP (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20783326
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Impact Assessment Review; Journal Volume: 26; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.eiar.2005.02.001; PII: S0195-9255(05)00002-8; Copyright (c) 2005 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENTS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION; ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY; EUROPEAN UNION; RECOMMENDATIONS; REGULATIONS; UNITED KINGDOM

Citation Formats

Wood, Graham, Glasson, John, and Becker, Julia. EIA scoping in England and Wales: Practitioner approaches, perspectives and constraints. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.eiar.2005.02.001.
Wood, Graham, Glasson, John, & Becker, Julia. EIA scoping in England and Wales: Practitioner approaches, perspectives and constraints. United States. doi:10.1016/j.eiar.2005.02.001.
Wood, Graham, Glasson, John, and Becker, Julia. Sat . "EIA scoping in England and Wales: Practitioner approaches, perspectives and constraints". United States. doi:10.1016/j.eiar.2005.02.001.
@article{osti_20783326,
title = {EIA scoping in England and Wales: Practitioner approaches, perspectives and constraints},
author = {Wood, Graham and Glasson, John and Becker, Julia},
abstractNote = {Scoping plays a critical role in shaping the nature and extent of the environmental information subsequently contained in an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), yet it has been identified as an area of weakness in practice () and remains a poorly understood and under-researched component of EIA. This paper provides a detailed empirical investigation and assessment of recent scoping activity in England and Wales, in the context of evolving European Union (EU) regulations. Conceptual and contextual issues associated with scoping are outlined prior to the presentation of key findings, including: approaches to scoping; the assessment of significance; characteristics and influence of consultation; and perceived constraints to scoping. The paper concludes with an overview of findings, possible explanatory factors, and recommendations for future practice.},
doi = {10.1016/j.eiar.2005.02.001},
journal = {Environmental Impact Assessment Review},
number = 3,
volume = 26,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
  • This presentation describes four main issues that are of concern to system operators, which remain no matter what the structure of the industry. These main drivers are identified as: sufficient plant available to meet not just the peak demand of the year but day-by-day, 1/2hr-by-1/2hr; maintain quality and supply in terms of frequency control, voltage control, and system stability; manage and operate the system so that customers do not lose their connection after a credible system loss, constraining plant as necessary; manage fault situations and, if severe, then restore the network as quickly as possible. The system operations structure operatingmore » in England and Wales is working well and the quality of supply has not been degraded, but it is important to recognize and learn from some of the operational issues and difficulties that have been encountered. Impact on operation and security can be explained in terms of the three different operational timescales: planning, programming, and control.« less
  • The U.S. has some important lessons to learn from the restructuring in the U.K. Rather than repeat the lengthy theoretical debate that took place in California, the country should start by analyzing the possible significance of constraints in relation to market power, keeping in mind that constraints can confer market power and push up prices. There has been immense debate about transmission pricing in various parts of the U.S., with California leading the way to the first regulatory filing fence. Obviously traditional contract path pricing bears no relationship to the short-run costs of operating transmission - the focus of thismore » article - nor to the longer run costs of investments in transmission. What to put in its place? The arguments about how to handle the costs of constraints have been waged with fervor between the {open_quotes}bilateralists,{close_quotes} who wanted fixed capacity entitlements and predetermined costs, and the supporters of a spot market power pool (or {open_quotes}poolco{close_quotes}). Although there is much wrong with the system in England & Wales, at least it is up and running and one can learn from it. The first section outlines the character of the transmission system and power plants in England & Wales. The second section explains how the Pool calculates the spot price of electricity and treats short run transmission costs. The third section considers the principle of and possible consequences of locational pricing, stressing the scope for - and consequences of - gaming constraints. The fourth explains how the Norwegians deal with constraints and how the Australians are proposing to deal with them. The fifth section describes how California proposes to deal with transmission pricing and the link with pooling. The sixth section concludes with some lessons that might usefully be considered in U.S. restructuring.« less