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Title: Bridging the gap between theory and practice in integrated assessment

Abstract

There is growing support for the use of integrated assessments (IAs)/sustainability impact assessments (SIAs), at different government levels and geographic scales of policy-making and planning, both nationally and internationally. However, delivering good quality IAs/SIAs, in the near future, could be challenging. This paper mainly focuses upon one area of concern, differences between research and other technical contributions intended to strengthen assessment methodologies and the types of assessment methods considered usable by practitioners. To help in addressing this concern, the development of a common assessment framework is proposed, which is based on a shared, practitioner-researcher-stakeholder understanding of what constitutes a satisfactory integrated/sustainability impact assessment. The paper outlines a possible structure for this framework, which contains three interconnected elements-the planning context in which the assessment is to be carried out; the process by which the assessment is to be undertaken and its findings used; and the methods, technical and consultative, by which impacts are to be assessed. It concludes with suggested 'next steps', addressed to researchers, practitioners and other stakeholders, by which the assessment framework might be tested and improved, and its subsequent use supported.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Institute for Development Policy and Management, University of Manchester (United Kingdom). E-mail: norman.lee1@virgin.net
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20783317
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Impact Assessment Review; Journal Volume: 26; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.eiar.2005.01.001; PII: S0195-9255(05)00004-1; Copyright (c) 2005 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENTS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION; ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY; PLANNING

Citation Formats

Lee, Norman. Bridging the gap between theory and practice in integrated assessment. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.eiar.2005.01.001.
Lee, Norman. Bridging the gap between theory and practice in integrated assessment. United States. doi:10.1016/j.eiar.2005.01.001.
Lee, Norman. Sun . "Bridging the gap between theory and practice in integrated assessment". United States. doi:10.1016/j.eiar.2005.01.001.
@article{osti_20783317,
title = {Bridging the gap between theory and practice in integrated assessment},
author = {Lee, Norman},
abstractNote = {There is growing support for the use of integrated assessments (IAs)/sustainability impact assessments (SIAs), at different government levels and geographic scales of policy-making and planning, both nationally and internationally. However, delivering good quality IAs/SIAs, in the near future, could be challenging. This paper mainly focuses upon one area of concern, differences between research and other technical contributions intended to strengthen assessment methodologies and the types of assessment methods considered usable by practitioners. To help in addressing this concern, the development of a common assessment framework is proposed, which is based on a shared, practitioner-researcher-stakeholder understanding of what constitutes a satisfactory integrated/sustainability impact assessment. The paper outlines a possible structure for this framework, which contains three interconnected elements-the planning context in which the assessment is to be carried out; the process by which the assessment is to be undertaken and its findings used; and the methods, technical and consultative, by which impacts are to be assessed. It concludes with suggested 'next steps', addressed to researchers, practitioners and other stakeholders, by which the assessment framework might be tested and improved, and its subsequent use supported.},
doi = {10.1016/j.eiar.2005.01.001},
journal = {Environmental Impact Assessment Review},
number = 1,
volume = 26,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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