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Title: Secondary gamma rays from ultrahigh energy cosmic rays produced in magnetized environments

Abstract

Nearby sources of cosmic rays up to a ZeV(=10{sup 21} eV) could be observed with a multimessenger approach including secondary {gamma}-rays and neutrinos. If cosmic rays above {approx}10{sup 18} eV are produced in magnetized environments such as galaxy clusters, the flux of secondary {gamma}-rays can be enhanced by a factor {approx}10 at Gev energies and by a factor of a few at TeV energies, compared to unmagnetized sources. Particularly enhanced are synchrotron and cascade photons from e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs produced by protons from sources with relatively steep injection spectra {proportional_to}E{sup -2.6}. Such sources should be visible at the same time in ultrahigh energy cosmic ray experiments and {gamma}-ray telescopes.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. APC, AstroParticules et Cosmologie, 11, place Marcelin Berthelot, F-75005 Paris (France)
  2. (France)
  3. Physics Department, ETH Zuerich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20782869
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 73; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.73.083008; (c) 2006 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; COSMIC NEUTRINOS; EEV RANGE; ELECTRONS; GALAXY CLUSTERS; GAMMA RADIATION; GEV RANGE; PAIR PRODUCTION; PHOTONS; POSITRONS; PROTONS; TEV RANGE

Citation Formats

Armengaud, Eric, Sigl, Guenter, GReCO, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, C.N.R.S., 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris, and Miniati, Francesco. Secondary gamma rays from ultrahigh energy cosmic rays produced in magnetized environments. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.73.083008.
Armengaud, Eric, Sigl, Guenter, GReCO, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, C.N.R.S., 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris, & Miniati, Francesco. Secondary gamma rays from ultrahigh energy cosmic rays produced in magnetized environments. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.73.083008.
Armengaud, Eric, Sigl, Guenter, GReCO, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, C.N.R.S., 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris, and Miniati, Francesco. Sat . "Secondary gamma rays from ultrahigh energy cosmic rays produced in magnetized environments". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.73.083008.
@article{osti_20782869,
title = {Secondary gamma rays from ultrahigh energy cosmic rays produced in magnetized environments},
author = {Armengaud, Eric and Sigl, Guenter and GReCO, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, C.N.R.S., 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris and Miniati, Francesco},
abstractNote = {Nearby sources of cosmic rays up to a ZeV(=10{sup 21} eV) could be observed with a multimessenger approach including secondary {gamma}-rays and neutrinos. If cosmic rays above {approx}10{sup 18} eV are produced in magnetized environments such as galaxy clusters, the flux of secondary {gamma}-rays can be enhanced by a factor {approx}10 at Gev energies and by a factor of a few at TeV energies, compared to unmagnetized sources. Particularly enhanced are synchrotron and cascade photons from e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs produced by protons from sources with relatively steep injection spectra {proportional_to}E{sup -2.6}. Such sources should be visible at the same time in ultrahigh energy cosmic ray experiments and {gamma}-ray telescopes.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVD.73.083008},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 8,
volume = 73,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
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