skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Formation of laser plasma channels in a stationary gas

Abstract

Plasma channels with nonuniformity of about {+-}3.5% have been produced by a 0.3 J, 100 ps laser pulses in a nonflowing gas, contained in a cylindrical chamber. The laser beam passed through the chamber along its axis via pinholes in the chamber walls. Plasma channels with an electron density in the range of 10{sup 18}-10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} were formed in pure He, N{sub 2}, Ar, and Xe. A uniform channel forms in an optimal pressure range at a certain time delay, depending on the gas molecular weight. The interaction of the laser beam with the gas leaking out of the chamber through the pinholes was not significant. However, the formation of the ablative plasma on the walls of pinholes by the wings of radial profile of the laser beam plays an important role in the plasma channel formation and its uniformity. A low-current glow discharge initiated in the chamber improves the uniformity of the plasma channel slightly, while a high-current arc discharge leads to overdense plasma near the front pinhole and further refraction of the laser beam. These results indicate the potential for using nonflowing gas targets to create uniform plasma channels.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)
  2. (TRINITI), Troitsk 142190 (Russian Federation)
  3. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20782761
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physics of Plasmas; Journal Volume: 13; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2195383; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; ABLATION; ARGON; CYLINDRICAL CONFIGURATION; ELECTRIC ARCS; ELECTRON DENSITY; GLOW DISCHARGES; HELIUM; LASER-PRODUCED PLASMA; LASERS; LIGHT TRANSMISSION; NITROGEN; PLASMA DENSITY; PLASMA PRODUCTION; PULSES; TIME DELAY; WALL EFFECTS; XENON

Citation Formats

Dunaevsky, A., Goltsov, A., Greenberg, J., Valeo, E., Fisch, N.J., Troitsk Institute of Innovative and Thermonuclear Research, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Department of MAE, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543. Formation of laser plasma channels in a stationary gas. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2195383.
Dunaevsky, A., Goltsov, A., Greenberg, J., Valeo, E., Fisch, N.J., Troitsk Institute of Innovative and Thermonuclear Research, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Department of MAE, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, & Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543. Formation of laser plasma channels in a stationary gas. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2195383.
Dunaevsky, A., Goltsov, A., Greenberg, J., Valeo, E., Fisch, N.J., Troitsk Institute of Innovative and Thermonuclear Research, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Department of MAE, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543. Sat . "Formation of laser plasma channels in a stationary gas". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2195383.
@article{osti_20782761,
title = {Formation of laser plasma channels in a stationary gas},
author = {Dunaevsky, A. and Goltsov, A. and Greenberg, J. and Valeo, E. and Fisch, N.J. and Troitsk Institute of Innovative and Thermonuclear Research and School of Engineering and Applied Science, Department of MAE, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543},
abstractNote = {Plasma channels with nonuniformity of about {+-}3.5% have been produced by a 0.3 J, 100 ps laser pulses in a nonflowing gas, contained in a cylindrical chamber. The laser beam passed through the chamber along its axis via pinholes in the chamber walls. Plasma channels with an electron density in the range of 10{sup 18}-10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} were formed in pure He, N{sub 2}, Ar, and Xe. A uniform channel forms in an optimal pressure range at a certain time delay, depending on the gas molecular weight. The interaction of the laser beam with the gas leaking out of the chamber through the pinholes was not significant. However, the formation of the ablative plasma on the walls of pinholes by the wings of radial profile of the laser beam plays an important role in the plasma channel formation and its uniformity. A low-current glow discharge initiated in the chamber improves the uniformity of the plasma channel slightly, while a high-current arc discharge leads to overdense plasma near the front pinhole and further refraction of the laser beam. These results indicate the potential for using nonflowing gas targets to create uniform plasma channels.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2195383},
journal = {Physics of Plasmas},
number = 4,
volume = 13,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
  • The formation of plasma channels of a femtosecond laser pulse in the bulk of fused silica is studied by numerical simulation, and the advantages of using a conical lens (axicon) over conventional parabolic lenses are shown. It is found that the length of the plasma channel formed with the help of an axicon exceeds the length of the channel formed upon lens focusing. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)
  • We report coupling and guiding of pulses of peak power up to 0.3 TW in 1.5-cm-long preformed plasma waveguides, generated in a high repetition rate argon gas jet. Coupling of up to 52{percent} was measured for 50-mJ, {approximately}110-fs pulses injected at times longer than 20 ns, giving guided intensities up to {approximately}5{times}10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}. For short delays between waveguide generation and pulse injection, pulse shortening occurred, with this effect reduced either by increasing delay or injecting a prepulse into the waveguide. There is excessive taper at the waveguide ends, which results from reduced heating at the ends of themore » jet by the waveguide generation pulse. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}« less
  • We report coupling and guiding of pulses of peak power up to 0.3 TW in 1.5 cm long preformed plasma waveguides generated in a high repetition rate argon gas jet. Coupling of up to 52{percent} was measured for 50 mJ, {minus}110 fs pulses injected at times longer than 20 ns, giving guided intensities up to {minus}5{times}10{sup 16}&hthinsp;W/cm{sup 2}. It was found that for short delays between waveguide generation and pulse injection, pulse shortening occurred, with this effect reduced as delay was increased. Injection into the waveguide of two consecutive pulses separated by a few nanoseconds resulted in the reduction ofmore » shortening of the second pulse at all delays. Femtosecond time-resolved shadowgrams of the coupling of injected pulses into the waveguide show that there is {approximately}0.5 mm of neutral gas remaining at the waveguide entrance after waveguide generation. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}« less
  • We report coupling and guiding of pulses of peak power up to 0.3 TW in 1.5 cm long preformed plasma waveguides generated in a high repetition rate argon gas jet. Coupling of up to 52% was measured for 50 mJ, -110 fs pulses injected at times longer than 20 ns, giving guided intensities up to -5x10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}. It was found that for short delays between waveguide generation and pulse injection, pulse shortening occurred, with this effect reduced as delay was increased. Injection into the waveguide of two consecutive pulses separated by a few nanoseconds resulted in the reductionmore » of shortening of the second pulse at all delays. Femtosecond time-resolved shadowgrams of the coupling of injected pulses into the waveguide show that there is {approx}0.5 mm of neutral gas remaining at the waveguide entrance after waveguide generation.« less