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Title: Black hole formation from collapsing dust fluid in a background of dark energy

Abstract

The gravitational collapse of a spherically symmetric star, made of a dust fluid, {rho}{sub DM}, in a background of dark energy, p=w{rho} (w<-1/3) is studied. It is found that when only dark energy is present, black holes are never formed. When both of them are present, black holes can be formed, due to the condensation of the dust fluid. Initially the dust fluid may not play an important role, but, as time increases, it will dominate the collapse and finally lead to formation of black holes. This result remains true even when the interaction between the dust fluid and dark energy does not vanish. When w<-1 (phantoms), some models also can be interpreted as representing the death of a white hole that ejects both dust and phantoms. The ejected matter recollapses to form a black hole.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2735, Beijing 100080 (China)
  2. CASPER, Physics Department, Baylor University, 101 Bagby Avenue, Waco, Texas 76706 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20782597
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 73; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.73.063005; (c) 2006 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; BLACK HOLES; COSMOLOGY; DUSTS; FLUIDS; GRAVITATIONAL COLLAPSE; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; STARS; WHITE HOLES

Citation Formats

Cai Ronggen, and Wang Anzhong. Black hole formation from collapsing dust fluid in a background of dark energy. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.73.063005.
Cai Ronggen, & Wang Anzhong. Black hole formation from collapsing dust fluid in a background of dark energy. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.73.063005.
Cai Ronggen, and Wang Anzhong. Wed . "Black hole formation from collapsing dust fluid in a background of dark energy". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.73.063005.
@article{osti_20782597,
title = {Black hole formation from collapsing dust fluid in a background of dark energy},
author = {Cai Ronggen and Wang Anzhong},
abstractNote = {The gravitational collapse of a spherically symmetric star, made of a dust fluid, {rho}{sub DM}, in a background of dark energy, p=w{rho} (w<-1/3) is studied. It is found that when only dark energy is present, black holes are never formed. When both of them are present, black holes can be formed, due to the condensation of the dust fluid. Initially the dust fluid may not play an important role, but, as time increases, it will dominate the collapse and finally lead to formation of black holes. This result remains true even when the interaction between the dust fluid and dark energy does not vanish. When w<-1 (phantoms), some models also can be interpreted as representing the death of a white hole that ejects both dust and phantoms. The ejected matter recollapses to form a black hole.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVD.73.063005},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 6,
volume = 73,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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