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Title: Correlation analysis of stochastic gravitational wave background around 0.1-1 Hz

Abstract

We discuss prospects for direct measurement of stochastic gravitational wave background around 0.1-1 Hz with future space missions. It is assumed to use correlation analysis technique with the optimal time-delay-interferometry (TDI) variables for two sets of LISA-type interferometers. The signal to noise for detection of the background and the estimation errors for its basic parameters (amplitude, spectral index) are evaluated for proposed missions.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4186 Frederick Reines Hall, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20782593
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 73; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.73.063001; (c) 2006 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; AMPLITUDES; CORRELATIONS; COSMOLOGY; DETECTION; ERRORS; GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTORS; GRAVITATIONAL WAVES; INTERFEROMETERS; INTERFEROMETRY; NOISE; SIGNALS; SPACE; TIME DELAY; VISIBLE RADIATION

Citation Formats

Seto, Naoki, and Theoretical Astrophysics, MC 130-33, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125. Correlation analysis of stochastic gravitational wave background around 0.1-1 Hz. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.73.063001.
Seto, Naoki, & Theoretical Astrophysics, MC 130-33, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125. Correlation analysis of stochastic gravitational wave background around 0.1-1 Hz. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.73.063001.
Seto, Naoki, and Theoretical Astrophysics, MC 130-33, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125. Wed . "Correlation analysis of stochastic gravitational wave background around 0.1-1 Hz". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.73.063001.
@article{osti_20782593,
title = {Correlation analysis of stochastic gravitational wave background around 0.1-1 Hz},
author = {Seto, Naoki and Theoretical Astrophysics, MC 130-33, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125},
abstractNote = {We discuss prospects for direct measurement of stochastic gravitational wave background around 0.1-1 Hz with future space missions. It is assumed to use correlation analysis technique with the optimal time-delay-interferometry (TDI) variables for two sets of LISA-type interferometers. The signal to noise for detection of the background and the estimation errors for its basic parameters (amplitude, spectral index) are evaluated for proposed missions.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVD.73.063001},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 6,
volume = 73,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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