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Title: Search for gravitational waves from binary black hole inspirals in LIGO data

Abstract

We report on a search for gravitational waves from binary black hole inspirals in the data from the second science run of the LIGO interferometers. The search focused on binary systems with component masses between 3 and 20M{sub {center_dot}}. Optimally oriented binaries with distances up to 1 Mpc could be detected with efficiency of at least 90%. We found no events that could be identified as gravitational waves in the 385.6 hours of data that we searched.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. LIGO-California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States) (and others)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20782591
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 73; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.73.062001; (c) 2006 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; BLACK HOLES; COSMOLOGY; DISTANCE; GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTORS; GRAVITATIONAL WAVES; INTERFEROMETERS; INTERFEROMETRY; MASS

Citation Formats

Abbott, B., Abbott, R., Adhikari, R., Agresti, J., Anderson, S.B., Araya, M., Armandula, H., Asiri, F., Barish, B.C., Barnes, M., Barton, M.A., Bhawal, B., Billingsley, G., Black, E., Blackburn, K., Bork, R., Brown, D.A., Busby, D., Cardenas, L., and Chandler, A.. Search for gravitational waves from binary black hole inspirals in LIGO data. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.73.062001.
Abbott, B., Abbott, R., Adhikari, R., Agresti, J., Anderson, S.B., Araya, M., Armandula, H., Asiri, F., Barish, B.C., Barnes, M., Barton, M.A., Bhawal, B., Billingsley, G., Black, E., Blackburn, K., Bork, R., Brown, D.A., Busby, D., Cardenas, L., & Chandler, A.. Search for gravitational waves from binary black hole inspirals in LIGO data. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.73.062001.
Abbott, B., Abbott, R., Adhikari, R., Agresti, J., Anderson, S.B., Araya, M., Armandula, H., Asiri, F., Barish, B.C., Barnes, M., Barton, M.A., Bhawal, B., Billingsley, G., Black, E., Blackburn, K., Bork, R., Brown, D.A., Busby, D., Cardenas, L., and Chandler, A.. Wed . "Search for gravitational waves from binary black hole inspirals in LIGO data". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.73.062001.
@article{osti_20782591,
title = {Search for gravitational waves from binary black hole inspirals in LIGO data},
author = {Abbott, B. and Abbott, R. and Adhikari, R. and Agresti, J. and Anderson, S.B. and Araya, M. and Armandula, H. and Asiri, F. and Barish, B.C. and Barnes, M. and Barton, M.A. and Bhawal, B. and Billingsley, G. and Black, E. and Blackburn, K. and Bork, R. and Brown, D.A. and Busby, D. and Cardenas, L. and Chandler, A.},
abstractNote = {We report on a search for gravitational waves from binary black hole inspirals in the data from the second science run of the LIGO interferometers. The search focused on binary systems with component masses between 3 and 20M{sub {center_dot}}. Optimally oriented binaries with distances up to 1 Mpc could be detected with efficiency of at least 90%. We found no events that could be identified as gravitational waves in the 385.6 hours of data that we searched.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVD.73.062001},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 6,
volume = 73,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • We report on the methods and results of the first dedicated search for gravitational waves emitted during the inspiral of compact binaries with spinning component bodies. We analyze 788 hours of data collected during the third science run (S3) of the LIGO detectors. We searched for binary systems using a detection template family specially designed to capture the effects of the spin-induced precession of the orbital plane. We present details of the techniques developed to enable this search for spin-modulated gravitational waves, highlighting the differences between this and other recent searches for binaries with nonspinning components. The template bank wemore » employed was found to yield high matches with our spin-modulated target waveform for binaries with masses in the asymmetric range 1.0M{sub {center_dot}}<m{sub 1}<3.0M{sub {center_dot}} and 12.0M{sub {center_dot}}<m{sub 2}<20.0M{sub {center_dot}} which is where we would expect the spin of the binary's components to have a significant effect. We find that our search of S3 LIGO data has good sensitivity to binaries in the Milky Way and to a small fraction of binaries in M31 and M33 with masses in the range 1.0M{sub {center_dot}}<m{sub 1}, m{sub 2}<20.0M{sub {center_dot}}. No gravitational wave signals were identified during this search. Assuming a binary population with spinning components and Gaussian distribution of masses representing a prototypical neutron star-black hole system with m{sub 1}{approx_equal}1.35M{sub {center_dot}} and m{sub 2}{approx_equal}5M{sub {center_dot}}, we calculate the 90%-confidence upper limit on the rate of coalescence of these systems to be 15.9 yr{sup -1}L{sub 10}{sup -1}, where L{sub 10} is 10{sup 10} times the blue light luminosity of the Sun.« less
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