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Title: Induction of immune response in macaque monkeys infected with simian-human immunodeficiency virus having the TNF-{alpha} gene at an early stage of infection

Abstract

TNF-{alpha} has been implicated in the pathogenesis of, and the immune response against, HIV-1 infection. To clarify the roles of TNF-{alpha} against HIV-1-related virus infection in an SHIV-macaque model, we genetically engineered an SHIV to express the TNF-{alpha} gene (SHIV-TNF) and characterized the virus's properties in vivo. After the acute viremic stage, the plasma viral loads declined earlier in the SHIV-TNF-inoculated monkeys than in the parental SHIV (SHIV-NI)-inoculated monkeys. SHIV-TNF induced cell death in the lymph nodes without depletion of circulating CD4{sup +} T cells. SHIV-TNF provided some immunity in monkeys by increasing the production of the chemokine RANTES and by inducing an antigen-specific proliferation of lymphocytes. The monkeys immunized with SHIV-TNF were partly protected against a pathogenic SHIV (SHIV-C2/1) challenge. These findings suggest that TNF-{alpha} contributes to the induction of an effective immune response against HIV-1 rather than to the progression of disease at the early stage of infection.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Veterinary Microbiology, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889-2192 (Japan)
  2. Laboratory of Primate Model, Experimental Research Center for Infectious Disease, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)
  3. Department of Veterinary Microbiology, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889-2192 (Japan). E-mail: a0d518u@cc.miyazaki-u.ac.jp
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20779440
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Virology; Journal Volume: 343; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.virol.2005.08.025; PII: S0042-6822(05)00515-5; Copyright (c) 2005 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; AIDS VIRUS; APOPTOSIS; CELL PROLIFERATION; GENES; IMMUNITY; IN VIVO; LYMPH NODES; LYMPHOCYTES; LYMPHOKINES; MONKEYS; PATHOGENESIS

Citation Formats

Shimizu, Yuya, Miyazaki, Yasuyuki, Ibuki, Kentaro, Suzuki, Hajime, Kaneyasu, Kentaro, Goto, Yoshitaka, Hayami, Masanori, Miura, Tomoyuki, and Haga, Takeshi. Induction of immune response in macaque monkeys infected with simian-human immunodeficiency virus having the TNF-{alpha} gene at an early stage of infection. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1016/J.VIROL.2005.0.
Shimizu, Yuya, Miyazaki, Yasuyuki, Ibuki, Kentaro, Suzuki, Hajime, Kaneyasu, Kentaro, Goto, Yoshitaka, Hayami, Masanori, Miura, Tomoyuki, & Haga, Takeshi. Induction of immune response in macaque monkeys infected with simian-human immunodeficiency virus having the TNF-{alpha} gene at an early stage of infection. United States. doi:10.1016/J.VIROL.2005.0.
Shimizu, Yuya, Miyazaki, Yasuyuki, Ibuki, Kentaro, Suzuki, Hajime, Kaneyasu, Kentaro, Goto, Yoshitaka, Hayami, Masanori, Miura, Tomoyuki, and Haga, Takeshi. 2005. "Induction of immune response in macaque monkeys infected with simian-human immunodeficiency virus having the TNF-{alpha} gene at an early stage of infection". United States. doi:10.1016/J.VIROL.2005.0.
@article{osti_20779440,
title = {Induction of immune response in macaque monkeys infected with simian-human immunodeficiency virus having the TNF-{alpha} gene at an early stage of infection},
author = {Shimizu, Yuya and Miyazaki, Yasuyuki and Ibuki, Kentaro and Suzuki, Hajime and Kaneyasu, Kentaro and Goto, Yoshitaka and Hayami, Masanori and Miura, Tomoyuki and Haga, Takeshi},
abstractNote = {TNF-{alpha} has been implicated in the pathogenesis of, and the immune response against, HIV-1 infection. To clarify the roles of TNF-{alpha} against HIV-1-related virus infection in an SHIV-macaque model, we genetically engineered an SHIV to express the TNF-{alpha} gene (SHIV-TNF) and characterized the virus's properties in vivo. After the acute viremic stage, the plasma viral loads declined earlier in the SHIV-TNF-inoculated monkeys than in the parental SHIV (SHIV-NI)-inoculated monkeys. SHIV-TNF induced cell death in the lymph nodes without depletion of circulating CD4{sup +} T cells. SHIV-TNF provided some immunity in monkeys by increasing the production of the chemokine RANTES and by inducing an antigen-specific proliferation of lymphocytes. The monkeys immunized with SHIV-TNF were partly protected against a pathogenic SHIV (SHIV-C2/1) challenge. These findings suggest that TNF-{alpha} contributes to the induction of an effective immune response against HIV-1 rather than to the progression of disease at the early stage of infection.},
doi = {10.1016/J.VIROL.2005.0},
journal = {Virology},
number = 2,
volume = 343,
place = {United States},
year = 2005,
month =
}
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